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European Journal of Policing Studies

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Issue 4, 2014 Expand all abstracts
Article

Introduction

Authors Antoinette Verhage, Lieselot Bisschop and Wim Hardyns

Antoinette Verhage

Lieselot Bisschop

Wim Hardyns
Article

Capacity building and the Afghan National Police

Views from the frontline

Keywords Afghanistan, Intelligence, Capacity, Policy transfer
Authors Gavin Boyd and Gordon Marnoch
AbstractAuthor's information

    The article reports on a study of an intelligence management capacity building programme involving former Police Service of Northern Ireland officers mentoring members of the Afghan National Police. The study contributes to the formative evaluation of a policy transfer based on principles and practices developed in Northern Ireland. A short discussion of Afghanistan, policing, intelligence management and policy transfer is provided, before attention is given to the capacity building programme. The study is context rich drawing on qualitative data. Analysis draws on face to face interviews conducted with mentors working with the ANP during 2010-2012. Interview questions were broad in nature encouraging respondents to discuss implementation in their own terms. Respondents generally concluded policy transfer was viable but were in a position to provide a great deal of information on the Afghan context and how specific problems occurred during implementation of the capacity building programme. Cultural issues, corruption and resource constraints presented obstacles to the transfer as did the general absence of a bureaucratic basis for managing the ANP. Violence and physical geography presented rather less of a problem than was anticipated. The need to learn more about appropriate inter-personal skills in capacity building emerged as a significant finding. Such knowledge is currently undervalued in policy transfer within the policing sector.


Gavin Boyd
Gavin Boyd is currently a policing consultant and researcher. He acted as a programme evaluator in Afghanistan 2010-13. After completing service in the RUC and PSNI where he held the rank of superintendent he held a lecturing post in policing studies at the University of Ulster.

Gordon Marnoch
Dr. Gordon Marnoch (Corresp.: gj.marnoch@ulster.ac.uk) is a public policy specialist, who has written extensively on the rise of new public management, evidence based policy, evaluation and performance. He is currently a reader in policy studies at the University of Ulster. He has consulted on behalf of numerous public bodies including those in the criminal justice field.
Article

Two systems, one challenge?

Comparing legal regulation on police co-operation in Australia and Europe

Keywords police cooperation, legal harmonisation, mutual recognition, EU, Australia
Authors Saskia Hufnagel
AbstractAuthor's information

    This article compares of legal harmonisation with a view to facilitating police cooperation in the EU and Australia. It addresses the main processes of harmonisation and the parallel strategies of mutual recognition and the creation broad legal frameworks in relation to both systems. The legal analysis is complemented by interviews with practitioners in the field to assess the impact of legal initiatives on actual police cooperation practice. It is argued that both systems have developed distinctive strategies to promote police cooperation through legal harmonisation, but that Australia, due to its federal political structure, has more potential to achieve harmonised and even uniform legislation within its states. However, the strategies developed in the EU to promote cooperation without legal harmonisation and in particular broad legal frameworks have created a high level of regional practitioner initiative promoting bilateral and multilateral formalisation of cooperation strategies that cannot be observed in Australia. Both entities have hence developed distinct structures that might be relevant to the respective other system. This study is the first to compare the Australian federal system of cooperation with the EU.


Saskia Hufnagel
Queen Mary, University of London. Dr Saskia Hufnagel (corresp.: s.m.hufnagel@qmul.ac.uk) is a Lecturer in Criminal Law at Queen Mary, University of London. Her research interests encompass law enforcement cooperation in Asia, North America, the EU and Australasia, comparative constitutional law, terrorism legislation and the policing of art crime. She is a qualified German legal professional and accredited specialist in criminal law.
Article

International police reform and project management

Empirical observations on EULEX Kosovo

Keywords EULEX, Kosovo, international police reform, programmatic approach, best practices, personnel gap
Authors Jelle Janssens
AbstractAuthor's information

    In February 2008, the European Union (EU) launched its largest civilian crisis management operation under its Common Security and Defence Policy: the EU Rule of Law Mission in Kosovo (EULEX). It was to take over UNMIK’s rule of law functions and help pave the way for Kosovo’s European integration. Based on field research conducted in Kosovo from November 2010 until February 2011 and interviews with members of EULEX, this article examines one distinctive element of EULEX’s approach towards police reform: the programmatic approach. Although promising and based on principles of sound project management, this approach is faced with a number of challenges that are inextricably bound with international police missions and relate to the cumbersome process of recruiting a sufficient number of qualified personnel. However, the article contends that because of its distinctive character, EULEX’s programmatic approach may provide an alternative to the conventional manner in which international police reform is being conceived and especially composed.


Jelle Janssens
Jelle Janssens (corresp.: Jelle.Janssens@UGent.be) is a doctoral assistant at the department of penal law and criminology at the law faculty of Ghent University and member of the Institute for International Research on Criminal Policy (IRCP). He holds a PhD. in criminology. His research focuses on governance of security and plural policing in transitional societies.
Article

Information-sharing in interorganizational collaboration between the police and other authorities in Finland

Keywords inter-organizational collaboration, police work, information exchange, crime control
Authors Jenni Niemi, Iina Sahramäki and Pirjo Jukarainen
AbstractAuthor's information

    Due to the complexity of crime phenomena and crime control, the extent and importance of collaboration and strategic partnership between security actors has notably increased during the last decades. These changes pose challenges to the police organization and management. This joint paper of three individual research projects discusses collaboration between the police and other authorities in Finland within these contemporary type of inter-organizational networks. The data was in each case collected via thematic interviews of the police and various other authorities. The focus is on information exchange. We analyse factors that promote information sharing, as well as factors that hinder it. We also consider the communication practices from the viewpoint of more profound collaboration and knowledge creation. Our research shows that police officers consider inter-organizational collaboration as a substantial part of today’s crime prevention, but the change in policing is still on-going. The collaboration between the police and other authorities is still largely based on concrete actions and specific cases. Deeper collaboration and knowledge creation on larger issues mostly takes place at the managerial level. In the future, a challenge is to bring knowledge creation practices into local collaboration and planning of concrete actions. Three individual studies enable a wide examination of inter-organizational collaboration in crime control. Focus on information exchange from the police point of view sheds light on the practices of everyday policing. The examples are from the Finnish police, but the results on mechanisms of collaboration can be applied to police work in other countries as well.


Jenni Niemi
M.Soc.Sci Jenni Niemi has worked as researcher at the Police College of Finland. Her research topics include e.g. inter-organizational collaboration in prevention of irregular migration and hate crimes.

Iina Sahramäki
M.Soc.Sci Iina Sahramäki works as researcher at the Police College of Finland. Her current research topic relates to prevention and investigation of environmental crimes. She is working on her PhD on the linkage between illegal waste flows and grey economy.

Pirjo Jukarainen
PhD Pirjo Jukarainen is an Adjunct Professor at the University of Tampere, Finland and currently works as a researcher at the Police College of Finland. Her fields of expertise include cross-border cooperation, international crisis management and recently intelligence-led policing.
Article

Country updates

Belgium

Authors Antoinette Verhage
Author's information

Antoinette Verhage
Postdoctoral researcher Faculty of Law, Ghent University (Belgium) Editor-in-Chief EJPS.
Article

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England and Wales

Authors Layla Skinns
Author's information

Layla Skinns
Senior Lecturer Centre for Criminological Research University of Sheffield Regional editor for the UK.
Article

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Germany

Authors Thomas Feltes
Author's information

Thomas Feltes
Professor at the Faculty of Law, University of Bochum Regional editor for Germany.
Article

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Greece

Authors Amnesty International
Author's information

Amnesty International
Source: press release http://www.amnesty.org/en/news/impunity-excessive-force-and-links-extremist-golden-dawn-blightgreek-police-2014-04-03.
Article

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Norway

Authors Tore Bjørgo
Author's information

Tore Bjørgo
Professor of Police Science Norwegian Police University College Regional editor for Norway.
Article

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Slovenia

Authors Branko Lobnikar, Andrej Sotlar and Maja Jere
Author's information

Branko Lobnikar
Faculty of Criminal Justice and Security University of Maribor, Slovenia.

Andrej Sotlar
Faculty of Criminal Justice and Security University of Maribor, Slovenia.

Maja Jere
Faculty of Criminal Justice and Security University of Maribor, Slovenia.