International Institute of Space Law

Article

International Regulatory and Licencing Schemes for Telecommunication Satellites in Low-Earth Orbit to Mitigate Anti- Competitive Behaviour and Manage Natural Monopolies

Keywords regulation, orbit, space, law, jurisprudence, tetrad
Authors Thomas Green, Patrick Neumann, Kent Grey, Trevor Sandlin, Thomas Cullum, Ilana Pender-Rose en Robert Mahoney
Author's information

Thomas Green
Thomas Green, PhD Student, University of Wollongong; tjg171@uowmail.edu.au.

Patrick Neumann
Patrick Neumann, Chief Scientist, Neumann Space Pty Ltd; paddy@neumannspace.com.

Kent Grey
Kent Grey, Partner, Minter Ellison, 25 Grenfell Street, Adelaide 5000 Australia; kent.grey@minterellison.com.

Trevor Sandlin
Trevor Sandlin, Chief Mate AGT, USNS Salvor, United States Merchant Marine; sandlin.trevor@gmail.com.

Thomas Cullum
Thomas Cullum, Engineer, Neumann Space Pty Ltd; tomc@neumannspace.com.

Ilana Pender-Rose
Ilana Pender-Rose; ilanapenderrose@gmail.com.

Robert Mahoney
Robert Mahoney, Founder, Southern Cross Innovations; robert.mahoney24@gmail.com.
  • Abstract

      Previous work has been undertaken (Green, Neumann, Grey 2018) to consider the development of the Newspace Sector and its impact on space activities in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). This previous work noted that although propertisation of space and celestial bodies is prohibited pursuant to the Outer Space Treaty 1967 (UN), orbits within space still remain rivalrous and commercially lucrative. For example, by operating in a LEO environment, a constellation of satellites would prevent other competitors from also operating and providing services within that same orbital plane or orbital shell. A regulatory scheme may be advantageous in mitigating anti-competitive conduct between private enterprises by allowing new entrants to market to gain access to commercially lucrative orbital planes, while ensuring access for government continues for national security and emergency response activities. This paper will consider these issues and explore what a regulatory or licensing scheme would look like for private enterprises operating in LEO and how UNOOSA and the ITU may act as arbiters. This paper will also offer solutions to facilitate a regulatory; or, licensing scheme that prevents anti-competitive conduct.

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