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Vareen Vanterpool
MA, Advanced Legislative Studies, 2005-2006, School of Advanced Study, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, University of London. Senior Crown Counsel, Government of the British Virgin Islands.

Rehema Mkuye
Drafter at the Ministry of Justice in Tanzania.

Helen Xanthaki
Senior Lecturer and Academic Director, Centre for Legislative Studies, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London; Lawyer (Athens’ Bar).

Alfred Tovias
Walter Rathenau Professor in European Economics, Department of International Relations, Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Director of the Leonard Davis Institute for International Relations and Jean Monnet Chair in External Economic Relations of the EU. The author would like to thank an anonymous referee for his comments.

Rachel L. Rinehart
J.D. candidate, May 2009, Indiana University School of Law - Indianapolis. B.S. 2006, Indiana Wesleyan University. The author would like to express her gratitude to Professor Karlson, Professor Emmert, and Professor McEldowney for their assistance with this note. The author would also like to thank Jenny Prinz and Tom Donohoe from the Indiana International and Comparative Law Review for their helpful comments on this Note.

Anna-Lena Högenauer
B.A. King's College London, 2005; M.A. College of Europe, 2006; Ph.D. candidate at the University of Edinburgh. This paper was first presented at the international conference “The Lisbon Reform Treaty: Internal and External Implications” organized by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, the Leonard Davis Institute for International Relations and the Israeli Association for the Study of European Integration in Jerusalem on 13 and 14 July 2008. The author thanks Prof. Charlie Jeffery for his encouragement.

Sergio Fabbrini
Professor of Political Science at the University of Trento (Italy) where he directs the School of International Studies, and the editor of the Italian Journal of Political Science. Address: University of Trento, School of International Studies, via Verdi 8/10, I-38100 Trento, Italy, Sergio.Fabbrini@sis.unitn.it.
Article

Mutual Recognition in Criminal Matters in Cyprus

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 1 2009
Authors Theodora Christou, Eleni Kouzoupi and Helen Xanthaki
Author's information

Theodora Christou
European Cross Border Justice Project Manager, The AIRE Centre.

Eleni Kouzoupi
Counsel of the Republic, Law Office of the Republic of Cyprus. The views presented in this chapter are personal and can only be attributed to the author in her personal capacity. They do not reflect, express or bind the views of the Republic of Cyprus.

Helen Xanthaki
Senior Lecturer and Academic Director, Centre for Legislative Studies, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London, Lawyer (Athens Bar).

Philippe Billiet
Hammonds LLP.

Catherine Skinner
LL.M., University of London, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies.
Editorial

Editorial

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 2 2009
Authors Constantin Stefanou
Author's information

Constantin Stefanou
Senior Lecturer and LLM Co-Director at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London.

Jonathan Teasdale
LL.B., LL.M., LARTPI, FRSA, Barrister. The author is presently a lawyer within the Statute Law Repeals team at the Law Commission for England and Wales, although responsibility for the content of this article lies solely with the author, and the article does not purport in any way to reflect the views of the Law Commission.

Stephen Laws CB
The article Plus ça change? Continuity and Change in UK Legislative Drafting Practice was written by Stephen Laws of the Parliamentary Counsel Office. It is published with the permission of the Controller of HMSO and The Queen's Printer for Scotland.

La Toya James
Crown Counsel, Government of the Virgin Islands, Road Town, Tortola, British Virgin Islands.

Gogontle Keneilwe Gatang
Gogontle Keneilwe Gatang is a Legislative Drafter in the Legislative Drafting Division of the Attorney General's Chambers in Botswana. The views in this paper are solely that of the writer and not of the Attorney General's Chambers.

Geetha Mazarelo
Masters student at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies 2008. The content of this article was completed in August 2008 and does not cover developments after this time, for example the full passage of the Counter-Terrorism Bill 2008 (Counter-Terrorism Act 2008) is not analysed..

Filippo Fontanelli
f.fontanelli@sssup.it. PhD candidate, Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Global Hauser Scholar, NYU Law School. Many thanks to N. Walker, N. Lavranos and G. Martinico for their valuable comments. Usual disclaimer applies.

Prof. Dr. Lesley Jane Smith
Leuphana University of Luneburg/ Weber-Steinhaus & Smith, Bremen, Germany,, ljsmith@barkhof.uni-bremen.de
Article

Methods and Materials in Constitutional Law

Some Thoughts on Access to Government Information as a Problem for Constitutional Theory and Socio-Legal Studies

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 1 2011
Keywords Citizenship, democracy, government information, representative government, secrecy
Authors Barry Sullivan
AbstractAuthor's information

    To be subject to law, Hobbes argued, is to be deprived of liberty, as we understand it. In this respect, democratic governments are no different from others. Hobbes’s insight has not caused us to abandon our commitments to democracy, but it still challenges us to think hard about the nature of representative government, the nature of citizenship in a democratic society, and the conditions necessary for fulfilling the promise of democratic citizenship. Two recent trends are evident. Some citizens have embraced a more active sense of citizenship, which necessarily entails a more insistent need for information, while governments have insisted on the need for greater concentration of governmental power and a higher degree of secrecy. Much is to be learned from the approaches that various national and transnational regimes have taken with respect to this problem. This essay will consider the problem of access to government information from a comparative perspective and as a problem for constitutional theory and socio-legal studies.


Barry Sullivan
Cooney & Conway Chair in Advocacy and Professor of Law, Loyola University Chicago School of Law.
Article

Investor Protection v. State Regulatory Discretion

Definitions of Expropriation and Shrinking Regulatory Competence

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 1 2011
Keywords regulatory freeze, expropriation, investor protection, economic governance, environmental protection
Authors Ioannis Glinavos
AbstractAuthor's information

    The purpose of this paper is to offer support to the idea that the contemporary international legal framework offers opportunities to investors to challenge and control government action via what has been described as a ‘regulatory freeze’. This regulatory freeze is the consequence of government reluctance to legislate/regulate in areas where claims of expropriation may be brought. The paper presents evidence from investment-treaty dispute resolution mechanisms, national and supranational judicial processes from both sides of the Atlantic. The paper concludes by suggesting that the potential for expanded definitions of expropriation is having a greater impact than actual case outcomes, as states seek to preempt any adverse developments by shying away from regulations that may provide fertile grounds for challenge. This effect is significant, as it is contrary to expectations of greater state involvement in economic management bred by the financial crisis.


Ioannis Glinavos
Dr. Ioannis Glinavos is Lecturer in Law at the University of Reading, School of Law, i.glinavos@reading.ac.uk.
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