Search result: 32 articles

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Year 2013 x
Article

Genderquota in de wetenschap, het bedrijfsleven en de rechterlijke macht in België

Journal Res Publica, Issue 3 2013
Keywords gender quotas, policy, science, business, judges
Authors Eva Schandevyl, Alison E. Woodward, Elke Valgaeren e.a.
AbstractAuthor's information

    Belgium is an early adapter of gender quotas to increase the presence of women in decision-making, as quotas for advisory councils and electoral politics date from the 1990’s. The advisory commission regulations had effects for research and scientific bodies, while the boards of publically funded corporations recently came into view. Notwithstanding many attempts, gender quotas have not (yet) been introduced in the higher regions of the justice system. This article investigates the lively scene of debates on Belgian quotas and comparatively explores the process of adopting quotas in science, business and justice. It focuses on the intensity of the debates, the arguments constituting the debate and the main actors driving it. The analysis demonstrates rich variation with respect to these three elements, which points to the importance of nuanced and context specific analyses when implementation processes of quotas in various sectors are studied.


Eva Schandevyl
Eva Schandevyl is deeltijds onderzoeksprofessor aan RHEA Onderzoekscentrum Gender & Diversiteit en het Departement Metajuridica van de Vrije Universiteit Brussel. Haar onderzoek heeft onder meer betrekking op intellectuele geschiedenis, vrouwenrechten en de geschiedenis van justitie.

Alison E. Woodward
Alison E. Woodward is hoogleraar aan het Departement Politieke Wetenschappen van de Vrije Universiteit Brussel, co-voorzitter van RHEA en Senior Fellow van The Institute for European Studies. Haar recent onderzoek behandelt de rol van het transnationale middenveld in de EU-crisis en gender in de besluitvorming.

Elke Valgaeren
Elke Valgaeren was op het ogenblik van de redactie van deze bijdrage operationeel directeur van het onderzoekscentrum SEIN – Identity, Diversity & Inequality Research, Universiteit Hasselt. Ze verrichtte er onderzoek naar diversiteit in het bedrijfsleven. Momenteel is ze diensthoofd van de studiedienst van de Gezinsbond.

Machteld De Metsenaere
Machteld De Metsenaere is gewoon hoogleraar aan de Faculteit Recht en Criminologie van de VUB en sinds 1992 directeur van RHEA. Haar onderzoek concentreert zich op gender (geschiedenis), geschiedenis van collaboratie en repressie, gelijke kansen en diversiteit.
Symposium

De zin en onzin van genderquota in het bedrijfsleven

Journal Res Publica, Issue 3 2013
Authors Sabine de Bethune, Sonja Becq, Nick Deschacht e.a.
Author's information

Sabine de Bethune
Sabine de Bethune is senatrice voor de CD&V-fractie en sinds 2011 voorzitster van de Belgische Senaat.

Sonja Becq
Sonja Becq is federaal volksvertegenwoordiger voor de Vlaamse christendemocratische partij CD&V.

Nick Deschacht
Nick Deschacht is arbeidseconoom en docent aan de Hogeschool-Universiteit Brussel (KU Leuven). Zijn onderzoek spitst zich toe op het kwantitatief analyseren van discriminatie op de arbeidsmarkt en van de relatie tussen gender en carrières.

Eelke Heemskerk
Eelke Heemskerk is universitair docent politicologie aan de Universiteit van Amsterdam. Hij promoveerde in 2007 op ‘Decline of the Corporate Community’ en schreef samen met Meindert Fennema ‘Nieuwe Netwerken, de elite en de ondergang van de NV Nederland’.

Meindert Fennema
Meindert Fennema is emeritus hoogleraar politieke theorie aan de Universiteit van Amsterdam. Hij promoveerde in 1981 op ‘International Networks of Banks and Industry’.

Karen Celis
Karen Celis is als onderzoeksprofessor verbonden aan de Vakgroep Politieke Wetenschappen van de Vrije Universiteit Brussel en is lid van het RHEA Centrum voor Gender & Diversiteit. Ze verricht theoretisch en empirisch onderzoek naar de politieke vertegenwoordiging van groepen.

Sarah Childs
Sarah Childs is Professor of Politics and Gender aan de Universiteit van Bristol.
Introduction

Quo vadis quota? M/V van politiek tot bedrijf

Journal Res Publica, Issue 3 2013
Authors Karen Celis and Silvia Erzeel
Author's information

Karen Celis
Karen Celis is als onderzoeksprofessor verbonden aan de Vakgroep Politieke Wetenschappen van de Vrije Universiteit Brussel en is lid van het RHEA Centrum voor Gender & Diversiteit. Ze verricht theoretisch en empirisch onderzoek naar de politieke vertegenwoordiging van groepen.

Silvia Erzeel
Silvia Erzeel is F.R.S.-FNRS postdoctoraal onderzoekster (chargée de recherche) aan het Institut de sciences politiques Louvain-Europe (ISPOLE) van de Université catholique de Louvain. Haar onderzoek handelt over politieke vertegenwoordiging, politieke partijen en gender.
Article

Does Our Field Have a Centre?

Thoughts from the Academy

Journal International Journal of Conflict Engagement and Resolution, Issue 1 2013
Keywords Conflict and Peace studies, peacebuilding, pedagogy, George Mason University, S-CAR
Authors Kevin Avruch
AbstractAuthor's information

    This article is a personal reflection on the development of the field of conflict resolution/peace and conflict studies from the perspective of the classroom: how what is thought necessary to teach has changed as the field has grown and reacted to often turbulent political change


Kevin Avruch
Henry Hart Rice Professor of Conflict Resolution & Professor of Anthropology, School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution. I thank my colleagues Arthur Romano, Richard Rubenstein, and Dennis Sandole for their careful and critical reading of earlier drafts of this essay, and Oliver Ramsbotham for his critical reading of a later one. Their various suggestions greatly improved the work.
Article

The Historical Contingencies of Conflict Resolution

Journal International Journal of Conflict Engagement and Resolution, Issue 1 2013
Keywords History of ADR, consensus building, multi-party dispute resolution, theory development, conflict handling
Authors Carrie Menkel-Meadow
AbstractAuthor's information

    This article reviews the historical contingency of theory and practice in conflict engagement. World War II and the Cold War produced adversarial, distributive, competitive, and scarce resources conceptions of negotiation and conflict resolution, as evidenced by game theory and negotiation practice. More recent and more optimistic theory and practice has focused on party needs and interests and hopes for more party-tailored, contingent, flexible, participatory and more integrative and creative solutions for more than two disputants to a conflict. The current challenges of our present history are explored: continued conflict in both domestic and international settings, the challenge of “scaling up” conflict resolution theory and the problematics of developing universal theory in highly contextualized and diverse sets of conflict sites. The limits of “rationality” in conflict resolution is explored where feelings and ethical, religious and other values may be just as important in conflict engagement and handling.


Carrie Menkel-Meadow
Chancellor’s Professor of Law, University of California Irvine Law School and A.B. Chettle Jr. Professor of Dispute Resolution and Civil Procedure, Georgetown University Law Center.
Article

Is There a Theory of Radical Disagreement?

Journal International Journal of Conflict Engagement and Resolution, Issue 1 2013
Keywords Radical disagreement, linguistic intractability, agonistic dialogue, conflict engagement
Authors Oliver Ramsbotham
AbstractAuthor's information

    This article concerns linguistic intractability, the verbal aspect of those conflicts that so far cannot be settled or transformed. At its heart lies the phenomenon of radical disagreement. This is generally discounted in conflict resolution as positional or adversarial debate. It is seen as a terminus to dialogue that must from the outset be transformed, not learnt from. In this article the refusal to take radical disagreement seriously is traced back to the way radical disagreement is described and explained in the third party theories that frame attempts at settlement and resolution in the first place.
    On pp. 58-60 a theory of radical disagreement is contrasted with an example. In the theory radical disagreement is described as a juxtaposition of equivalent subjective narratives that do not ‘reflect truth’ but merely serve as ‘motivational tools’ for group survival. In the example, it can be seen that neither speaker is saying that. The Palestinian claim (A) is not about a subjective narrative or motivational tool, but about a lived reality endured for 60 years. And the Israeli claim (B) is not about a juxtaposition of equivalent accounts, but a fierce refutation of faults and misrepresentations in what the other says. This mismatch between third party theory and participant example explains a great deal about why third party interventions based on those theoretical assumptions fail.
    The rest of the article looks at a range of putative theories invoked in conflict analysis and conflict resolution. This is a search for third party descriptions and explanations that are adequate to examples of what they purport to describe and explain. Surprisingly the net is hauled in empty. The interim conclusion to this article is that there is no adequate theory of radical disagreement.
    In the first issue of the International Journal of Conflict Engagement and Resolution, this article sets the scene for an exploration of the relationship between engagement and resolution that it is hoped will be developed in future issues. It will be argued there that the practical implication of the discovery that there is no adequate theory of radical disagreement is that in intractable conflicts it is a mistake to ignore this phenomenon. Radical disagreement is not all too familiar but perhaps the least familiar feature of intense political conflict. What is required in the face of linguistic intractability, therefore, is not less radical disagreement but more – namely promotion of a ‘strategic engagement of discourses’. Only then is it possible to move from engagement to resolution and to create the space for a future revival of attempts at settlement and transformation in the linguistic sphere.


Oliver Ramsbotham
Emeritus Professor of Conflict Resolution, University of Bradford. Paper first presented at the Conflict Research Society Annual Conference, Coventry, September 2012.
Article

Relational Constructionism

Generative Theory and Practice for Conflict Engagement and Resolution

Journal International Journal of Conflict Engagement and Resolution, Issue 1 2013
Keywords Conflict transformation, conflict resolution, action research, positioning theory, relational constructionism
Authors Nikki R. Slocum-Bradley
AbstractAuthor's information

    This article draws upon relational constructionist ideas to facilitate a meta-theoretical shift in conflict engagement and transformation. Based upon insight into conceptual and relational inter-dependency, two tasks are suggested as key aims for future work: 1) nurturing a profound respect for inter-dependent self/other and appreciation for relationships, and 2) developing skills to construct nurturing, generative relationships. Underscoring that research, theory-building and other aspects of scholarship are in themselves practices, the author encourages the design of these and other practices to facilitate conflict transformation. Exploring the implications of relational constructionist insights, an approach is proposed that merges the boundaries of theory-building, research methodology, and conflict engagement: Action Research for the Transformation of Conflicts (ART-C). While ART-C provides a process that facilitates the construction of cooperative relationships, insights from Positioning Theory illuminate how actors co-construct relationships by evoking meanings and norms that guide action. These concepts are applied to a variety of examples from around the globe that illustrate the transformation of identities, relationships and conflicts.


Nikki R. Slocum-Bradley
Associate Research Fellow, United Nations University (UNU-CRIS).
Article

Crises and Opportunities:

Six Contemporary Challenges for Increasing Probabilities for Sustainable Peace

Journal International Journal of Conflict Engagement and Resolution, Issue 1 2013
Keywords Conflict resolution, peace, evidence-based practice, gender, systems
Authors Peter T. Coleman
AbstractAuthor's information

    The news from the field of peace and conflict studies is mixed. It is evident that the increasing complexity, interdependence and technological sophistication of conflict, violence and war today introduce many new challenges to peace-keeping, making and building. However, it is also likely that these trends present new opportunities for fostering and sustaining peace. If our field is to capitalize on such prospects, it will need to more effectively understand and address several basic dilemmas inherent to how we approach our work. This paper outlines six contemporary challenges, and suggests some options for addressing them.


Peter T. Coleman
Director of International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution and Professor of Psychology and Education at Teachers College and The Earth Institute at Columbia University.
Article

Access_open Microfinance: Dreams and Reality

Journal The Dovenschmidt Quarterly, Issue 2 2013
Keywords microfinance, economic development, microfinance success, Institutions, law and economics
Authors Katherine Helen Mary Hunt
AbstractAuthor's information

    Microfinance is an area of research whose popularity is reflected by the unique potential for wide-ranging socioeconomic outcomes that support political goals unmatched by alternative avenues for financial support. However, despite the large amounts of financial resources funding microfinance across the world, and glorious potential economic benefits, there is no consensus regarding the success or failure of microfinance in achieving socioeconomic political goals. This article examines the empirical literature on microfinance to establish where microfinance has developed from, the organization of microfinance institutions (MFIs), the success or failure of microfinance, and future research methodological possibilities. It has been found that the success or failure of microfinance depends on the benchmarks to which it is measured. From a social empowerment perspective, microfinance success has been observed. However, from an economic development perspective the results are equivocal. The success of microfinance is related to the mission of DQ because of the interdisciplinary approach to research and the effects of microfinance across social and economic fields. Further, microfinance continues to be an avenue for the practical realization of corporate social responsibility (CSR) organizational goals and thus it is of relevance to evaluate success in this industry to ensure the efficient and continued achievement of political goals.


Katherine Helen Mary Hunt
Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam Institute of Law and Economics.
Research Note

Hoe de traditionele laatkomer een modelleerling werd

De Belgische genderquota en pariteitsclausule verklaard

Journal Res Publica, Issue 2 2013
Authors Petra Meier
Author's information

Petra Meier
Petra Meier is hoofddocent aan het Departement Politieke Wetenschappen, Universiteit Antwerpen. Haar onderzoek concentreert zich op de (re)presentatie van gender in politiek en beleid. Momenteel werkt zij aan een boek over de symbolische vertegenwoordiging van gender.
Article

De intergenerationele overdracht van milieubewustzijn

De invloed van beide ouders en de rol van communicatie binnen het gezin

Journal Res Publica, Issue 1 2013
Keywords intergenerational transmission, socialization, environmental concern, adolescence, gender
Authors Cecil Meeusen
AbstractAuthor's information

    This study analyzes the intergenerational transmission of environmental concern. More specifically, the direct influence of the environmental concern of mother and father and the intermediary effect of communication about environmental problems within the family is investigated. Furthermore, the paper explores gender-specific patterns in the transmission of environmental concern. The data used in this paper stem from the Parent-Child Socialization Study (PCSS, 2012), in which 3,426 15-year old Flemish adolescents and both their parents were questioned about their social and political attitudes. The results clearly confirm the transmission hypothesis: the environmental concern of both mother and father had a signifi cant influence on the environmental concern of the offspring. Strong transmission effects were especially found in families that communicate regularly about the environment. This effect was stronger for girls than for boys. Nevertheless, there is still room for other influences with regard to the development of environmental concern, indicating that environmentalism is not a core-attitude within families.


Cecil Meeusen
Cecil Meeusen is als doctoraatsstudent verbonden aan het Centre for Citizenship and Democracy van de Faculteit Sociale Wetenschappen van de KU Leuven. Momenteel werkt ze aan een proefschrift rond de determinanten van etnocentrisme bij jongeren. Ze is voornamelijk geïnteresseerd in de ontwikkeling en evolutie van politieke en sociale attitudes tijdens de adolescentie.
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