Search result: 128 articles

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Irina Baraliuc
Irina Baraliuc is a PhD researcher at the Research Group Law, Science, Technology & Society (LSTS) at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel.

Sari Depreeuw
Sari Depreeuw is a postdoctoral researcher at the Research Group Law, Science, Technology & Society (LSTS) at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel and an attorney-at-law at the Brussels bar.

Serge Gutwirth
Serge Gutwirth is Professor at the Faculty of Law and Criminology of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel and director of the Research Group Law, Science, Technology & Society (LSTS).
Article

Access_open Globalization as a Factor in General Jurisprudence

Journal Netherlands Journal of Legal Philosophy, Issue 2 2012
Keywords general jurisprudence, globalization, global legal pluralism, legal positivism, analytical jurisprudence
Authors Sidney Richards
AbstractAuthor's information

    Globalization is commonly cited as an important factor in theorising legal phenomena in the contemporary world. Although many legal disciplines have sought to adapt their theories to globalization, progress has been comparatively modest within contemporary analytical jurisprudence. This paper aims to offer a survey of recent scholarship on legal theory and globalization and suggests various ways in which these writings are relevant to the project of jurisprudence. This paper argues, more specifically, that the dominant interpretation of globalization frames it as a particular form of legal pluralism. The resulting concept – global legal pluralism – comes in two broad varieties, depending on whether it emphasizes normative or institutional pluralism. This paper goes on to argue that these concepts coincide with two central themes of jurisprudence, namely its concern with normativity and institutionality. Finally, this paper reflects on the feasibility of constructing a ‘general’ and ‘descriptive’ jurisprudence in light of globalization.


Sidney Richards
Sidney Richards is Doctoral candidate in Law at Pembroke College at the University of Cambridge.
Article

The Impact of Europeanization of Contract Law on English Contract Law

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 2-3 2012
Keywords Rome I and II Regulations, Europeanization, contract law, Common European Sales Law, faulty goods
Authors Omar Abdelaziz
Abstract

    The ongoing process of Europeanization for promoting cross-border transactions and conferring better protection for consumers and small businesses has had its impact all over Europe. It represents a new step towards a harmonized set of legal rules to govern cross-border transactions in the field of contract law. So what is its exact scope? Who will benefit from it? What are its risks? What is its methodology? Does it represent a codification of common law rules? What will be its impact especially on common law countries such as the United Kingdom? The effectiveness of Europeanization depends almost entirely on the correct implementation into national law of the various directives; every member state is obliged to fully implement a harmonized measure into its domestic laws. This is accomplished by ensuring that (1) the relevant legal framework meets the requirements of the harmonized measure and (2) the application of the domestic rules giving effect to a harmonizing measure does not undermine the effectiveness of the European measure. English contract law is largely an uncodified law. Accordingly, the approach taken and the methods used by this jurisdiction to implement European directives into its national laws with the aim of harmonization are different. How did the English courts interpret legislations that implement EU legislations? Will Europeanization affect the deep-rooted principles and doctrines of English contract law (issues of commercial agency), good faith in pre-contractual obligations, unfair contract terms and specific performance? Finally, what could be the clash between European contract law, Rome I Regulations and the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods? Could this optional instrument be an exclusive law to either national or international mandatory rules for consumers in member states? What will be the qualification for a genuine consent of consumers in cross-border contracts? Will it lead to the development of the internal market as envisaged by the Commission?


Omar Abdelaziz
Article

Current Developments in the National Laws of Maintenance

A Comparative Analysis

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 1 2012
Keywords child maintenance, maintenance after divorce, calculation of maintenance, enforcement of maintenance claims, social security benefits
Authors Dieter Martiny
AbstractAuthor's information

    Maintenance law in European jurisdictions is in a state of constant transformation. Recent reforms, however, show some areas of major concern. In child maintenance law, particularly joint custody of the parents and an alternating residence of the child make the need for a better calculation of maintenance more apparent. The use of guidelines with tables and formulas is on the rise. In maintenance after divorce, the growing influence of the principle of self-sufficiency is leading to reductions of the maintenance payments made to former spouses. Enforcement of maintenance claims, the role of the State and the relationship with social security benefits remain difficult.


Dieter Martiny
Professor emeritus, European University Viadrina, Frankfurt (Oder)/Hamburg. A shorter version was presented at the Annual Conference on European Family Law of the Academy of European Law in Trier, 30 September 2011.
Introduction

Subsidiariteit in de EU en verder

Journal Res Publica, Issue 1 2012
Keywords European Union, subsidiarity, multilevel governance, complexity, power
Authors Ferdi De Ville and Jan Loisen
AbstractAuthor's information

    This introductory article sketches the problématique of this special issue on ‘Subsidiarity in the European Union and beyond’. It starts with a short historical overview of the origins, meanings and implementation of the subsidiarity principle within the EU. Subsequently, it problematizes the concept and application of subsidiarity in a multilevel governance context by examining two fundamental characteristics of this essentially contested concept that render it fascinating to study: its complexity and power-relevance. The relatively new concept of global subsidiarity is briefly discussed to situate the intra-EU discussion in a wider context. This introduction ends by discussing some of the findings of the special issue’s two substantial articles – that both deal with policy topics in which different competence regimes meet – in light of the subsidiarity problématique.


Ferdi De Ville
Ferdi De Ville is als doctor-assistent verbonden aan het Centrum voor EU-Studies, Vakgroep Politieke Wetenschappen, Universiteit Gent. Hij doceert over en doet onderzoek naar Europese economische en monetaire integratie en Europees handelsbeleid.

Jan Loisen
Jan Loisen is als senior onderzoeker verbonden aan IBBT-SMIT, een onderzoekscentrum van de Vrije Universiteit Brussel, en als docent aan de vakgroep communicatiewetenschappen van dezelfde universiteit. Zijn onderzoek richt zich op de vormgeving van media- en cultuurbeleid in internationale instellingen en de Europese Unie en op vraagstukken over handels- en mediabeleid in het bijzonder.
Article

Strijden voor of om de publieke omroep?

Hoe subsidiariteit de Europese Commissie en de lidstaten verdeelt in het staatssteunbeleid

Journal Res Publica, Issue 1 2012
Keywords state aid, public service broadcasting, cultural objectives, media policy
Authors Karen Donders
AbstractAuthor's information

    Since the early 1990s, the European Commission applies the State aid rules (part of European competition law) to the funding of national and subnational public broadcasters. This article analyzes to what extent discussions on the regulation and funding of public service broadcasting are determined by a conflictual notion of subsidiarity. Focusing on encounters between the European Commission on the one hand and Germany, the Netherlands and Flanders on the other hand, the article concludes that Member States and the European Commission focus more on competence divisions than on substantive discussions about the future of public service broadcasting. This is particularly regrettable as the digital age requires a thorough re-thinking of the role of public broadcasters in Western European democracies.


Karen Donders
Karen Donders doceert European Media Policy en European Information Society aan de Vrije Universiteit Brussel. Ze is senior onderzoeker bij het IBBT-SMIT (Vrije Universiteit Brussel). Haar postdoctorale onderzoek wordt gefinancierd door het FWO. Ze is gespecialiseerd in publiek omroepbeleid, Europees mededingingsbeleid in de mediasector en Europees mediabeleid.
Article

De impact van multi-level governance op de democratische input in het EU-handelsbeleid onder het Verdrag van Lissabon

Journal Res Publica, Issue 1 2012
Keywords multi-level governance, subsidiarity, EU trade policy, legitimacy, participation
Authors Fabienne Bossuyt
AbstractAuthor's information

    This article examines the impact of multi-level governance (MLG) on the democratic input into European Union (EU) trade policy under the Lisbon Treaty. Focusing on two recently concluded EU trade agreements, i.e. the multi-party agreement with Colombia and Peru and the association agreement with Central America, the article traces several dangers and risks that MLG entails for democratic accountability and participation, which are closely tied to the strong output-oriented nature of MLG and its emphasis on technical effi ciency. These dangers of MLG – the article argues – are not accidental, but are fi rmly rooted within an underlying hegemonic social-economic trend, characterised by an intentional (neo-liberal dominated) attempt to de-politise, and even de-democratise, European political policy-making.


Fabienne Bossuyt
Fabienne Bossuyt is doctor-assistent aan het Departement Politieke Wetenschappen van de Universiteit Gent. Haar onderzoek richt zich op het extern beleid van de Europese Unie, waaronder de sociale dimensie van het EU-handelsbeleid.

Patricia Popelier
Professor at the University of Antwerp, Post-Doctoral Researcher for FWO-Flanders (Fund for Scientific Research).

Haimo Schack
Professor of law, Director of the Institute for European and International Private and Procedural Law, University of Kiel. An earlier version of this article was published in German in Rabelsz 2001, vol. 65, pp. 615-633, as ‘Das neue Internationale Eheverfahrensrecht in Europa’. The following English version is published with the friendly permission of the editors of Rabelz.

Dita Sole
LL.B., Concordia International University Estonia School of Law; LL.M., Harvard University School of Law; Attorney-at-Law, New York. This article is based on my final thesis at Concordia.

Jean-Claude Piris
Director-General, Legal Service, Council of the European Union. The views expressed in this lecture are the author's personal views and do not in any way commit the position of the Council of the European Union. The author thanks Mr Tito Gallas, Head of the Section of the Lawyer-Linguists of the Council's Legal Service, for his assistance. This lecture was delivered on 8 November 2004. It has been published in French under the title Union européenne: comment rédiger une législation de qualité dans 20 langues et pour 25 Etats membres, 121 Revue du droit public 457-491 (2005).

Ulrich Karpen
Prof. Dr. iur. Universitätsprofessor at the Faculty of Law, University of Hamburg, Germany.

Shirley C. Ogata
J.D. 2005, Indiana University School of Law - Indianapolis.

Mario G. Losano

Ulrich Karpen
Prof. Dr. iur. Universitätsprofessor at the Faculty of Law, University of Hamburg, Germany.

Vareen Vanterpool
MA, Advanced Legislative Studies, 2005-2006, School of Advanced Study, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, University of London. Senior Crown Counsel, Government of the British Virgin Islands.

Christiana Dr. iur. Fountoulakis
Assistant Professor in Private Law, University of Basel

Margherita Poto
PhD, University of Pavia. Visiting researcher at Max Planck Institut für ausländisches und öffentliches Recht und Völkerrecht, Heidelberg. I am grateful to Prof. A. von Bogdandy, Director of the Max Planck Institute and to Prof. Tony Prosser, University of Bristol, for helpful comments. I would also like to express my gratefulness to Prof. R. Caranta, University of Turin. All mistakes remain mine.

Joseph G. Kobba
MA Student, Institute of Advanced legal Studies, University of London, 2007.
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