Search result: 201 articles

x

    In this article a non-binding global standard for solution of cross-border insolvency proceedings is introduced. These Global Principles for Cooperation in International Insolvency Cases can be used both in civil-law as well as common-law jurisdictions, and aim to cover all jurisdictions in the world. They are addressed to judges, insolvency practitioners and scholars, and aim to contribute to an improved global architecture of international insolvency.


Bob Wessels
Prof. Dr. Bob Wessels is an independent legal counsel in Dordrecht, The Netherlands, and professor International Insolvency Law, University of Leiden, School of Law. He can be reached at: info@bobwessels.nl.
Article

Responsive Law Reform: A Case Study in Privacy and the Media

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 1 2013
Keywords law reform, regulatory theory, privacy, free speech, media
Authors Megan Richardson
AbstractAuthor's information

    This article develops a regulatory theory of law reform for common law jurisdictions drawing on a model of responsive regulation and applies it to a case study in Privacy and the Media with particular reference to law reform initiatives in Australia, New Zealand and the UK.


Megan Richardson
Professor of Law and Co-Director Centre for Media & Communications Law, Melbourne Law School, The University of Melbourne, former member of an International Advisory Panel for the New South Wales Law Reform Commission reference on invasion of privacy. This article was substantially written at the Institute for Advanced Legal Studies, where I had the privilege of being a Research Fellow in September–December 2012. I am grateful to the Institute for allowing me to spend three months in this excellent facility and also to my home institution, The Melbourne Law School, for supporting my research period abroad. The ideas in this article were presented at seminars at the Institute and at the Dickson Poon School of Law, King’s College London. I am grateful to those who attended for their helpful comments and especially to Tanya Aplin, Lyria Bennett Moses, Desmond Browne QC, Stewart Dresner, James Michael and Jan Oster. Thanks also to my colleagues Andrew Kenyon and Jason Bosland for additional helpful insights.
Article

The Application of Exception Clauses of the Rome Convention and the Rome I Regulation by the Dutch Courts

An Escape from Reality?

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 1 2013
Keywords Rome Convention 1980, Rome I Regulation, choice of law, exception clause, international commercial contracts
Authors Emmely de Haan
AbstractAuthor's information

    Both the Rome Convention and its successor the Rome I Regulation contain much discussed provisions on applicable law in the case of absence of a choice of law. Both instruments contain so called ‘exception clauses’ which refer to a closer connection of the contract with one state to the law of another state resulting from the general presumptions. The Netherlands is the frontrunner with a highly restrictive interpretation of the exception clauses. The applicable law to a transnational dispute might not always be the law of the competent court, although courts tend to prefer their own national law with which they are familiar. This year it has been exactly 20 years since the first revolutionary ruling on the subject by the Dutch Supreme Court, the so called Balenpers case. With the recent transition of the Convention into the Regulation, it is useful to analyse these connecting factors and review them in the context of the new Regulation. The Dutch courts have developed numerous connecting factors over the years. The article analyses Dutch case law on international contracts of carriage and international employment contracts from the implementation of the Rome Convention to date.


Emmely de Haan
The author graduated from Utrecht University in 2012 with an LL.M. degree in Dutch Private Law and is currently an LL.M. candidate at the University of Virginia in the United States, specializing in International Trade Law and Regulation and Dispute Settlement. This article is a shorter version of her master thesis, which was supervised by Professor dr. K.R.S.D. Boele-Woelki.

Mahulena Hofmann
Prof. Dr., SES Chair in Satellite Communications and Media Law, University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg, mahulena.hofmann@uni.lu.
Article

Instructions to Draft Legislation

A Study on Legislative Drafting Process in Rwanda

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 2-3 2012
Keywords drafting instructions, Rwanda, quality of legislation
Authors Ruth Ikiriza
Abstract

    Drafting instructions are always difficult to discuss and evaluate because very often they depend on local traditions. Nevertheless, despite local traditions in drafting instructions their complete absence must be seen as a problem. This article tackles the issue of drafting instructions and their importance in the development of good drafts. And by good drafts the author means good quality drafts which will lead to good quality legislation. The article uses Rwanda as a case study and employs Thornton’s five stages of the drafting process as its basic methodology.


Ruth Ikiriza
Article

Scrutiny of Legislation in Uganda: A Case for Reform

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 2-3 2012
Keywords legislative scrutiny, emerging trends
Authors Isabel Omal
AbstractAuthor's information

    This article seeks to explain the significance of carrying out extensive legislative scrutiny in any jurisdiction, with emphasis being placed on the Ugandan experience as far as legislative scrutiny is done. As Parliaments all over the world continue to make laws that govern their citizens, it is only right that before any law is enacted, there must be adequate mechanism to ensure quality in the law in terms of substance and effect of the legislative proposal which ultimately impacts on good governance. Best practices and emerging trends in legislative scrutiny is drawn from the United Kingdom and Australia, which have put in place elaborate procedures and mechanism to ensure that all their legislative proposals are thoroughly scrutinized before they passed into law: and that even after the law has been enacted, it can be evaluated to see the effect of the law. Pre-legislative scrutiny and post-legislative scrutiny are thus important tools to ensure quality in legislation.


Isabel Omal
The author is a Legislative Lawyer working at the Law Commission in Uganda; she is also a fellow of the Ford Foundation-IFP scholarship and a member of Commonwealth Association of Legislative Counsel (CALC).
Article

Consultation: A Contribution to Efficiency of Drafting Process in Malaysia

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 2-3 2012
Keywords consultation, stakeholders, efficiency of drafting process, elements of efficiency, policy development
Authors Noor Azlina Hashim
AbstractAuthor's information

    Consultation in legislative drafting process is important and widely acknowledged. So far, many countries in the world have taken steps to foster consultation during the early stage of the drafting process. In Malaysia, the importance of opinion from the public or stakeholders in the output of the drafting process was recently evident when several bills presented before the Parliament were criticized because of the failure to take into consideration views and opinions from the public. In some cases, bills were postponed for policy review and refinement. This article examines and discusses consultation practices during the drafting process and analyses and considers the influence of consultation on the efficiency of the drafting process in Malaysia. The influence of consultation practice in relation to the drafting process were shown from a survey conducted on the drafters in the Drafting Division of the Attorney General’s Chambers of Malaysia.


Noor Azlina Hashim
The Attorney General’s Chambers of Malaysia.
Article

The Response of National Law to International Conventions and Community Instruments – the Dutch Example

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 1 2012
Keywords Legislative approaches, Private International Law codification, Book 10 of the Dutch Civil Code, Implementation of international instruments, Incorporation by reference
Authors Dorothea van Iterson
AbstractAuthor's information

    This paper, presented at a colloquium at Barcelona University in 2010, outlines the history of the codification of Private International Law (PIL) in the Netherlands, which was completed in 2011 by the introduction of Book 10 of the Dutch Civil Code (conflict of laws). It describes the policy guidelines followed in giving effect to international instruments, i.e. conventions and European legislation. Basically all types of international PIL rules are further regulated at the national level. Moreover, the national PIL codification contains a number of provisions which were borrowed from or inspired by international instruments.


Dorothea van Iterson
Former Counsellor of Legislation, Ministry of Justice of the Netherlands.

Prof. Gabriella Catalano Sgrosso
University of Rome, Italy, gab.sgrosso@alice.it.

Alice Clapman
Yale Law School; former teaching assistant at the Jagiellonian University Law Clinic.

Frank Emmert

Benjamin J. Richardson
School of Law, University of Manchester, UK.

Maria O'Neill
BCL, LLM, Solicitor (Republic of Ireland, England & Wales) Lecturer in Law, University of Abertay Dundee, Bell Street, Dundee.

Michael Coester
Professor at the University of Munich


Lord President of the Court of Sessions and Lord-Justice General of Scotland, 1989 to 1996; Lord of Appeal in Ordinary, 1996 to present.

Daniel Greenberg
Of Lincoln's Inn, Barrister; Parliamentary Counsel. This article is based on observations made by the author in the course of a lecture on statutory construction to the legal advisers to the Lord Chancellor on 10 October 2005. The author is greatly indebted to Saira Salimi of the Office of the Parliamentary Counsel for her comments on a troublesomely lengthy series of drafts

Geoffrey Bowman
The article “The Art of Legislative Drafting” was written by Sir Geoffrey Bowman of the Parliamentary Counsel Office. It is published with the permission of the Controller of HMSO and The Queen's Printer for Scotland. This is a slightly revised version of the Sir William Dale Memorial Lecture for 2005. It was given in the Senate House of London University on 7 November 2005 by Sir Geoffrey Bowman KCB, the First Parliamentary Counsel and a Bencher of Lincoln's Inn.

Andrea Schulz
First Secretary at the Permanent Bureau of the Hague Conference on Private International Law. Since the beginning of 2002, the author has been in charge of the negotiations which led to the Convention on Choice of Court Agreements. This article is an updated reprint of an earlier publication by the same author, The Hague Convention of 30 June 2005 on Choice of Court Agreements, VII Yearbook of Private International Law 1 (2005).

Ole Lando
Professor of Law, Copenhagen Business School; Chairman of the Commission on European Contract Law.

Adam (Adomas) Siudika
Candidate New York State Bar (USA). LL.B. Law University of Lithuania, Vilnius, (Lithuania), LL.M. Indiana University School of Law, Indianapolis, (USA). The author would like to thank Prof. Antony Page, Prof. Eleanor Kinney and Prof. Frank Emmert at Indiana University School of Law Indianapolis for their valuable remarks and encouragement. My deep appreciation to Domanskis' family from Western Springs, IL (USA) for their constant support and care.
Showing 141 - 160 of 201 results
1 2 3 4 5 6 8 10 11
You can search full text for articles by entering your search term in the search field. If you click the search button the search results will be shown on a fresh page where the search results can be narrowed down by category or year.