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Amichai Magen
JSD Candidate and Lecturer in Law, Stanford Law School; Fellow, Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law (CDDRL), Stanford University. I would like to express my thanks to Guy Harpaz and Lior Herman for their helpful comments and to the Leonard Davis Institute for International Relations, the Hebrew University, Jerusalem, for organizing the conference Approximation of Laws by Non-EU Countries to the EU Acquis, 27-28 May 2007, in which an earlier version of this article was presented. I am also grateful to CDDRL and Stanford Law School for their generous support of my research.

Michal S. Gal
LL.B., LL.M., S.J.D. Senior Lecturer and Director of Law and MBA Program, Haifa University School of Law; Global Hauser Visiting Professor, NYU School of Law and Visiting Professor, Georgetown University. I would like to thank participants at the conference The Approximation of Laws by Non-EU Countries to the EU Aquis for their most thoughtful comments. Many thanks to Guy Harpaz, Lior Herman, Arie Reich, Avishalom Tor and Spencer Weber Waller for their thoughtful comments and to Asaf Kazir for research assistance. All errors and omissions remain, of course, the author's. Comments are welcome: mgalresearch@gmail.com

Guy Harpaz
Jean Monnet Lecturer, Law Faculty and Department of International Relations, Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Lior Herman
European Institute, London School of Economics.

Guy Harpaz
Jean Monnet Lecturer, Law Faculty and Department of International Relations, Hebrew University, Jerusalem. President of the Israeli Association for the Study of European Integration. I would like to express my gratitude for the research assistance of Carmel Shenkar and Asaf Shamis and for the most helpful comments of Moshe Hirsch, Lior Herman, Amichai Magen and the anonymous referee. I am also grateful for the generous support given by the EU under the aegis of the Jean Monnet Action, by the Leonard Davis Institute for International Relations, the Hebrew University and by the University Institute for Diplomacy and Regional Co-operation, Tel Aviv University. The usual caveat applies. For a legal examination of the concept of approximation of laws in the Euro-Mediterranean context, see G. Harpaz, When East Meets West - Approximation of Laws in the Euro-Mediterranean Context, 43/1 CMLR 1 (2006). Comments to gharpaz@mscc.huji.ac.il are welcome.

Maya Sion-Tzidkiyahu
PhD candidate, Department of Political Science and the European Forum, and Jean Monnet Lecturer, Hebrew University, Jerusalem. I would like to thank Guy Harpaz and the anonymous readers for their useful and constructive comments. An early version of this article was presented at the conference The Lisbon Reform Treaty: Internal and External Implications, 13-14 July 2008 in the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Comments to mayasion@mscc.huji.ac.il are welcomed.

Sarah Seeger
Sarah Seeger is a researcher at the Center for Applied Policy Research (CAP) at the LMU Munich. This article is based on a paper presented at the international conference “The Lisbon Reform Treaty: Internal and External Implications” at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 13-14 July 2008. I am grateful to Dr. Guy Harpaz, an anonymous referee, Dr. Carlos Closa and the participants of the conference for their helpful comments.

Guy Harpaz
Jean Monnet Lecturer, Law Faculty and Department of International Relations, Hebrew University of Jerusalem and President of the Israeli Association for the Study of European Integration, gharpaz@mscc.huji.ac.il.

Lior Herman
European Institute, London School of Economics, l.e.herman@lse.ac.uk.
Article

What Critiques Have Been Made of the Socratic Method in Legal Education?

The Socratic Method in Legal Education: Uses, Abuses and Beyond

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 3-4 2010
Keywords Socratic method, legal education, learning theory, critical thinking, feminist pedagogy
Authors Christie A. Linskens Christie
AbstractAuthor's information

    Legal education is known for its use of the Socratic method. It appears, however, that the Socratic method may not be just for law students any more: American educators are now considering the method in the teaching of non-law school students. One perceived benefit of teaching by the Socratic method is that a student will learn by critical thinking rather than rote memorization. A major criticism of the method, however, is that a student may suffer low self-esteem from the perception that the method engages in ‘bullying’. The articles discussed in this literature review address the method in learning theory, the method in law school, criticisms of the method and proposals to use the method for non-law students. This article will analyze the Socratic method, the pros and cons of the method and its application outside of the law school.


Christie A. Linskens Christie
Christie A. Linskens Christie is a PhD Student, Urban Education at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Adjunct Professor at Marquette University Law School and Staff Attorney, Legal Aid Society of Milwaukee, Inc.
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