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Article

Fledgling Polish Space Industry Ready for Lift–Off

Law as a Risk Management Tool in the Emerging Space Sector

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 9 2018
Keywords outer space, space activity, national space law, liability in space law, Polish space law
Authors Katarzyna Malinowska
AbstractAuthor's information

    This paper presents an overview of recent developments in Poland from a regulatory and institutional point of view, as well as at a programme level. Though Poles played an active part in setting out the foundations of the international space law, largely through the pioneer of space law – Polish Professor Manfred Lachs – for many years the Polish space industry barely existed, consisting only of the activities of a few engineers brave enough to set up start-ups and cooperate with big international players. The situation changed in 2012, when Poland joined ESA as a full member. Joining ESA and opening up the space industry to small players can be perceived as a significant trigger for the boost of Polish space projects. The first results came quickly. The number of Polish companies active in the sector is growing rapidly, already reaching 300 companies, forming a consistent, consolidated group of large, medium and small enterprises. Over the last five years, the attitude of the government has also been changing.
    Concerning regulatory challenges, Poland has still not adopted comprehensive space legislation, though in July 2017, a draft law on space activity was published by the government. The legal concept adopted in the national space law, especially about risk management, may influence the development of the whole national space activity, which still suffers from insufficient capital to bear the high level of risk related to ultra-hazardous activity such as space activity. The recent tendencies covering small sats, New Space, suborbital flight and space mining are also the subject of pending legislative discussions.


Katarzyna Malinowska
Professor at Kozminski University, Poland, katarzynamalinowska@kozminski.edu.pl.

Roy Balleste
School of Law, St. Thomas University, 16401 NW 37th Avenue Street, Miami Gardens, Florida 33054, USA.

    This paper analyzes, on the one hand, the legitimate expectations and needs of the industries in terms of intellectual property protection for outer space research, as they need to be protected against violations and be free to grant exploitation licenses. On the other hand, it investigates if the use and exploitation of outer space and celestial bodies is carried out for the benefit and in the interest of all countries.
    The key issue of the protection of inventions in accordance with national and international regulations will also be addressed in the paper.
    The paper will start from a combined analysis of art. 5 of the IGA, establishing that each Partner shall retain jurisdiction and control over the elements it registers, and art. 21 of the IGA, which regulates intellectual property based on the quasi-territorial principle, and sets out that the regulations of the State in whose registered modules the invention occurs shall apply. The paper aims to examine national intellectual property protection regulations, highlighting possible conflicts of applicable national laws with respect to the place where the invention occurs and inventor nationality, but also regarding the recognition of the different patent systems adopted by ISS Partner States. European Partner States enjoy a privileged position, as set forth by paragraph 2 of art. 21 of the IGA.
    As the unique environment of the ISS calls for quick recognition of intellectual property licenses obtained in other Partner States, the paper will analyze the different Partners’ national legislation, existing International Conventions on the matter, such as the TRIPS Agreement, and European patent regulations, which streamline procedures and introduce stringent minimum protection standards in all the areas of intellectual property.


Gabriella Catalano Sgrosso
University of Rome, Italy, sgrossogabriella@gmail.com.

Robin J. Frank
Robin J. Frank, Esq., Associate General Counsel International Law, Office of the General Counsel, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, United States.

David R. Lopez
David R. Lopez, Attorney Adviser, Office of the General Counsel, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, United States.

Ermanno Francesco Napolitano
LL.M. Thesis Candidate, McGill University – Institute of Air and Space Law.

Maria Manoli
DCL Candidate, Institute of Air and Space Law, McGill University; Erin J.C. Doctoral Fellow in Space Governance.
Article

Space Debris Remediation, Its Regulation and the Role of Europe

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 1 2016
Keywords space debris, remediation, European Union, European Space Agency, International Code of Conduct for Outer Space Activities
Authors Jan Wouters, Philip De Man and Rik Hansen
AbstractAuthor's information

    Ever since the launch of the first space object, discarded bits and pieces ranging from disused payloads and spent upper stages to single bolts and tiny flakes of paint have been cluttering outer space, making valuable and widely used orbits and trajectories to and from earth increasingly unsafe for future use. The response of the international community to this immediate threat to the sustainable use of outer space has been slow and haphazard and remains limited to non-binding guidelines and technical recommendations for space debris mitigation. Recent events such as the 2007 Chinese ASAT test and the 2009 collision between an active American and an in-operational Russian communications satellite demonstrate that more needs to be done in order to develop a strong international regime on active debris remediation. Given the complexities of these issues and the lengthy nature of international negotiations, one should not expect a comprehensive legal regime for space debris mitigation and remediation to materialize any time soon. As it is in the own interest of its users to preserve outer space for future exploration and use, the regulation of debris mitigation by space agencies may well prove a valuable alternative as a starting point for binding remediation rules. Since new international initiatives in this respect are lacking, the present article looks at the various space actors in Europe and at the role some of them may play in developing global rules of space debris remediation.


Jan Wouters
Jean Monnet Chair ad personam EU and Global Governance, Full Professor of International Law and International Organizations and Director of the Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies and Institute for International Law, University of Leuven.

Philip De Man
Project Manager, Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies, University of Leuven.

Rik Hansen
Doctoral Researcher at the Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies and the Institute for International Law of the University of Leuven.
Article

Peaceful Purposes? Governing the Military Uses of Outer Space

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 1 2016
Keywords space law, armed conflict, peaceful purposes, space warfare
Authors Steven Freeland
AbstractAuthor's information

    The development of satellite technology to enhance the exploration and use of outer space has continued at a rapid rate ever since the space age began in 1957. Satellites play a vital part of many aspects of daily life, and also with respect to the conduct of armed conflict. Most military leaders regard space-related technology as an integral element of their strategic battle platform. This reflects the changing technological nature of armed conflict, which challenges many aspects of international law, including the regulation of warfare. This is particularly the case with respect to the use of satellite technology. Moreover, the continuing development of this technology challenges the core of the ‘peaceful purposes’ doctrine that underpins the international regulation of outer space. This article discusses the application of the United Nations Space Treaties and the laws of war to the use of outer space during armed conflict and offers some reflections as to what is required to properly address the issue.


Steven Freeland
Professor of International Law, Western Sydney University; Visiting Professor, University of Vienna: Permanent Visiting Professor, iCourts Centre of Excellence for International Courts, Denmark; Member of Faculty, London Institute of Space Policy and Law; Director, International Institute of Space Law; Member of the Space Law Committee, International Law Association; Member, European Centre of Space Law.

Setsuko Aoki
Keio University, Japan, saoki@ls.keio.ac.jp.
Article

Dealing with the Regulatory Vacuum in LEO

New Insurance Solutions for Small Satellites Constellations

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 4 2016
Authors Neta Palkovitz
Author's information

Neta Palkovitz
ISIS − Innovative Solutions In Space B.V., The Netherlands, n.palkovitz@isispace.nl, Ph.D. Candidate, International Institute of Air and Space Law, Leiden University, The Netherlands, neta.netnet@gmail.com.

Olavo de O. Bittencourt Neto
Professor Doctor, Catholic University of Santos, olavo.bittencourt@unisantos.br.

Kumar Abhijeet
Doctoral Candidate, Institute of Air and Space Law, University of Cologne, Germany
Article

Sustainable Space Exploration and Use

Space Mining in Present and Future Perspectives

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 1 2015
Authors Rishiraj Baruah and Nandini Paliwal
Author's information

Rishiraj Baruah
International Institute of Air and Space Law, Leiden University

Nandini Paliwal
International Institute of Air and Space Law, Leiden University

Olavo de O. Bittencourt Neto
Professor Doctor, Catholic University of Santos (Brazil)

Joyeeta Chatterjee
McGill University, Institute of Air and Space Law.

Fabio Tronchetti
Associate Professor of Law, School of Law, Harbin Institute of Technology, China; Adjunct Professor of Comparative National Space Law, School of Law, University of Mississippi, United States, Fabio.tronchetti@yahoo.com.

Elena Carpanelli
University of Milan Bicocca, Italy, elena.carpanelli@gmail.com.

Brendan Cohen
Stanford University, United States, brendan.cohen@alumni.stanford.edu

Irmgard Marboe
University of Vienna, Austria, irmgard.marboe@univie.ac.at.

Dr. Bernhard Schmidt-Tedd
German Aerospace Center DLR, Bernhard.Schmidt-Tedd@dlr.de

Dr. Gulnaz Khalimova
PhD, Moscow, Russia, khalimova@list.ru

Dr. Sergey Teselkin
Air Launch Aerospace Cooperation, Russia, teselkin@poletairlines.com

Prof.Dr. Irmgard Marboe
University of Vienna, Austria, irmgard.marboe@univie.ac.at
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