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Human Rights Literature Review

Croatia

Journal East European Yearbook on Human Rights, Issue 1 2020
Authors Matija Miloš
Author's information

Matija Miloš
Matija Miloš, PhD, junior faculty member at the Chair for Constitutional Law, University of Rijeka – Faculty of Law.
Article

Patience, Ladies

Gender-Sensitive Parliamentary Responses in a Time of Crisis

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 4 2020
Keywords gender sensitivity, parliament, responsiveness, COVID-19, democracy, women
Authors Sonia Palmieri and Sarah Childs
AbstractAuthor's information

    In early 2020, in the face of the Covid-19 pandemic, numerous parliaments played their rightful democratic role by following the advice of health and economic experts and swiftly passing emergency legislation and relief packages. This was, in many countries, an attempt to reach an equilibrium between saving lives and saving economic livelihoods, on the understanding that both were in serious jeopardy. In the face of public health measures many parliaments also found themselves having to reform their own rules, procedures and practices. In both cases – policy interventions and institutional redesign – it appears that parliamentary responses to the Covid-19 situation were less commonly based on the advice of gender experts or informed by considerations of gender inequalities. Few, if any, emergency packages were designed following a systematic consideration of existing, deeply entrenched gender inequalities, despite continuous public analysis and commentary about the disproportionate gender impacts of the pandemic and the resulting lockdowns; and no parliaments instituted (temporary) rule changes that prioritized the voices of women parliamentarians or constituents. In this article, which draws on our work drafting the UN Women Covid-19 Parliamentary Primer & Checklist, we revisit the democratic case for gender-sensitive parliaments, highlighting their particular relevance to the 2020 pandemic. We introduce our model for gender-sensitive crisis responses across four key stages of the parliamentary process presented in the Primer – representation, deliberation, legislation and scrutiny – and offer an initial assessment of what transpired in the world’s parliaments based on an IPU survey. We suggest that if parliaments are to be gender-sensitive institutions in times of crisis, they must not only change how they do politics but also develop and sustain a robust political culture that values gender equality and an ethic of caring that supports new rules, procedures and practices that better redress institutional gender deficiencies.


Sonia Palmieri
Sonia Palmieri, Australian National University.

Sarah Childs
Sarah Childs, Royal Holloway, University of London.
Rulings

ECJ 2 April 2020, case C-802/18 (Caisse pour l’avenir des enfants), Social Insurance

Caisse pour l’avenir des enfants – v – FV and GW, Luxembourg case

Journal European Employment Law Cases, Issue 2 2020
Keywords Social Insurance
Abstract

    Child benefits connected with pursuing activities as employed persons are social advantages within the meaning of Article 45 TFEU and Article 7(2) of Regulation 492/2011/EU. Articles 1(i) and 67 of Regulation 883/2004/EC in conjunction with Articles 7(2) of Regulation 492/2011 and Article 2(2) of Directive 2004/38/EC preclude provisions according to which member states provide frontier workers only child benefits for their own children, but not for their spouses’ children who they support, while all children living in the member state are entitled to these childs benefits.

Article

Access_open The Feminisation of Belgian Local Party Politics

Journal Politics of the Low Countries, Issue 2 2020
Keywords local politics, local party branches, local elections, gender quotas, Belgium
Authors Robin Devroe, Silvia Erzeel and Petra Meier
AbstractAuthor's information

    This article investigates the feminisation of local politics. Starting from the observation that the representation of women in local electoral politics lags behind the regional and federal level, and taking into account the relevance of local party branches in the recruitment and selection of candidates for elections, we examine the extent to which there is an ‘internal’ feminisation of local party branches and how this links to the ‘external’ feminisation of local electoral politics. Based on surveys among local party chairs, the article maps patterns of feminisation over time and across parties, investigates problems local branches encounter in the recruitment of candidates for local elections, and analyses the (attitudes towards the) measures taken to further the integration of women in local electoral politics. We conclude that internal and external feminisation do not always go hand in hand and that local politics continues to be a male-dominated political biotope.


Robin Devroe
Robin Devroe is a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Political Sciences of Ghent University and member of the research group GASPAR. Her main research interest is the study of the political representation of diverse social groups and voting behaviour, with a specific focus on the descriptive representation of women, and she has a fascination for experimental methods. Her doctoral work (2019, Ghent University) focused on the prevalence of political gender stereotypes among Flemish voters. In the past, Robin was a visiting scholar at Texas A&M University (2018, US). Since 2020, she has been co-convenor of the European Consortium for Political Research’s (ECPR’s) Group on Gender and Politics.

Silvia Erzeel
Silvia Erzeel is Assistant Professor at the Department of Political Science, Vrije Universiteit Brussel. Her research interests include party politics, political representation, gender and intersectionality, and comparative politics. Her current research focuses on three main areas: the integration of gender equality in political parties, intersectionality and political representation in Europe, and the consequences of economic and social inequality for representative democracy. Since 2018, she has been co-convenor of the European Consortium for Political Research’s (ECPR’s) Standing Group on Gender and Politics.

Petra Meier
Petra Meier is Professor of Politics at the Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Antwerp. Her research focuses on the (re)presentation of gender+ in politics and policies. Late work focused on the conceptualisation of symbolic representation, how it operates and the issues at stake from an inclusive perspective. Recently, she turned to study democratic deficits in federal systems, especially Belgium, and processes of de-democratisation in general. She is particularly interested in understanding how such processes affect the demos, more particularly from a gender, an LGBTQI or an ethnic perspective, and what dynamics of marginalisation and exclusion they generate.
Article

Intersectionaliteit in de media: representatie van Nederlandse Kamerleden met een migratieachtergrond in dagbladen, 1986-2016

Journal Res Publica, Issue 4 2017
Keywords intersectionality, media, political representation, gender, ethnicity, categories
Authors Liza Mügge and Anne Louise Schotel
AbstractAuthor's information

    The media are key actors in political inclusion and exclusion. Existing research has shown that women and racial minorities receive less coverage and are portrayed more negatively than white males. Yet, less is known about differences in media coverage within and between groups. This study disentangles such variation with an intersectional lens. Drawing on newspaper analysis of all 55 politicians with a migration background who ever held a seat in Dutch parliament (1986-2016) we analyze the quantity and tone of media coverage and examine how they are identified. Our findings show that although women receive more coverage than men, this is no advantage. Women are framed more often and in more variety as ‘different’ compared to their male minority colleagues. The most visible politicians are particularly negatively described in terms of their different identities when they aim to achieve a higher position of power in the party.


Liza Mügge
Liza Mügge is universitair hoofddocent aan de afdeling politicologie en directeur van het Amsterdam Research Centre for Gender & Sexuality van de Universiteit van Amsterdam. Zij is medeoprichter en redacteur van het European Journal of Politics and Gender. Haar expertise en onderzoeksinteresses zijn politieke vertegenwoordiging, diversiteit en transnationalisme.

Anne Louise Schotel
Anne Louise Schotel behaalde haar masterdiploma in de sociale wetenschappen aan de Universiteit Utrecht en werkt nu aan haar PhD-voorstel bij het departement politicologie aan de Universiteit van Amsterdam.
Research Note

Onbekende gezichten

Substantiële vertegenwoordiging van vrouwen door mannelijke, rechtse en niet-feministische parlementsleden

Journal Res Publica, Issue 4 2015
Authors Karen Celis and Silvia Erzeel
Author's information

Karen Celis
Karen Celis is als onderzoeksprofessor verbonden aan de Vakgroep Politieke Wetenschappen van de Vrije Universiteit Brussel en is co-directeur van RHEA Expertisecentrum Gender, Diversiteit, Intersectionaliteit. Ze verricht theoretisch en empirisch onderzoek naar de politieke vertegenwoordiging van groepen (vrouwen, etnische minderheden, klasse, holebi’s en leeftijdsgroepen), gelijkekansenbeleid en ‘staatsfeminisme’.

Silvia Erzeel
Silvia Erzeel is F.R.S.-FNRS postdoctoraal onderzoekster aan het Institut de sciences politiques Louvain-Europe (ISPOLE) van de Université catholique de Louvain en gastdocent aan de Universiteit Antwerpen. Haar onderzoek handelt over de interne werking van politieke partijen, politieke ideologie, vergelijkende politiek, en diversiteit/intersectionaliteit in Europese parlementen.
Article

Legal Motherhood and Parental Responsibility

A Comparative Study on the Tensions between Scientific Knowledge, Social Reality and Personal Identity

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 2 2015
Keywords motherhood, child’s right to identity, baby-box, secret birth, confidential birth
Authors Prof. dr. Christine Budzikiewicz and Dr. Machteld Vonk
AbstractAuthor's information

    For the past 15 to 20 years there has been intense discussion in many European countries how mothers in a crisis situation can be prevented from abandoning or even killing their new born babies. Baby-boxes have been installed in a number of countries and/or possibilities for anonymous birth have been discussed or introduced. The Committee on the Rights of the Child expressed concern over these developments and stated that both developments infringe on the child’s right to know its origins. Both Germany and the Netherlands have taken steps to protect new mothers and their babies in crisis situations by introducing a form of secrecy surrounding the mother’s identity. In Germany this has taken the form of a recently introduced law that keeps the birth and the identity of the mother confidential, in the Netherlands this has taken the form of a protocol drawn up by professionals which aims to keep the birth and the mother’s identity secret. This article will compare and critically discuss these developments in Germany and the Netherlands.


Prof. dr. Christine Budzikiewicz
Prof. dr. Christine Budzikiewicz is professor of law at the Institute of Comparative Law of Marburg University in Germany, <www.uni-marburg.de/fb01/lehrstuehle/zivilrecht/budzikiewicz>.

Dr. Machteld Vonk
Dr. Machteld Vonk is assistant professor of child and family law at the Child Law Department of Leiden University Law School in The Netherlands, <http://law.leiden.edu/organisation/private-law/child-law/staff/mjvonk.html>.
Symposium

Euthanasie: gaat het nog wel goed in de Lage Landen?

Journal Res Publica, Issue 2 2015
Authors Gerbert van Loenen, Heleen Weyers and Herman Nys
Author's information

Gerbert van Loenen
Gerbert van Loenen is politicoloog en journalist. In februari 2015 verscheen van zijn hand Lof der onvolmaaktheid. Waarom zelfbeschikking niet genoeg is om goed te leven en te sterven, Utrecht, Ten Have. Eerder schreef hij Hij had beter dood kunnen zijn. Oordelen over andermans leven, Amsterdam, Van Gennep, 2009, dat in aangepaste en geactualiseerde vorm tevens is verschenen in het Duits (Das ist doch kein Leben mehr! Warum aktive Sterbehilfe zu Fremdbestimmung führt, Frankfurt/Main, Mabuse, 2014) en Do You Call This a Life? Blurred Boundaries in the Netherlands’ Right-to-Die Laws, London (Canada), RossLattner, 2015.

Heleen Weyers
Heleen Weyers is universitair docent bij de Vakgroep Rechtstheorie van de Rijkuniversiteit Groningen. Zij bestudeert sedert 20 jaar het euthanasiedebat in Nederland. Dit resulteerde onder andere in de dissertatie Euthanasie: het proces van rechtsverandering (2002/4) en in een standaardwerk over euthanasie dat ze samen schreef met John Griffiths en Maurice Adams: Euthanasia and Law in Europe (2008). Heel recent is zij lid geworden van een Regionale Toetsingscommissie Euthanasie.

Herman Nys
Herman Nys is gewoon hoogleraar medisch recht aan de faculteiten geneeskunde en rechtsgeleerdheid van de KU Leuven en directeur van het Centrum voor Biomedische Ethiek en Recht. Hij is lid van de European Group on Ethics in Science and New Technologies (EGE) bij de Europese Commissie.
Article

De substantiële vertegenwoordiging van moslimvrouwen

Vertegenwoordigende claims en responsiviteit in het Vlaamse hoofddoekendebat

Journal Res Publica, Issue 4 2013
Keywords political representation, representative claims, responsiveness, women’s substantive representation, the headscarf debate, women’s interests
Authors Eline Severs, Karen Celis and Petra Meier
AbstractAuthor's information

    Recently, scholars have propagated a ‘claim-based’ approach towards the study of women’s substantive representation. In this article, we challenge the relativism of such a ‘claim-based’ approach and explore the relevance of the concept of ‘responsiveness’ as a democratic criterion. We do so, more specifically, through a study of Muslim women’s substantive representation in the Flemish headscarf debate. We identify claims to speak for Muslim women formulated by (1) political parties and (2) Muslim women and (minority) women’s associations and examine the congruence between their respective claims. The important incongruence found between the claims formulated by right-wing and liberal parties and those of Muslim women/women’s associations provides empirical backing to the acclaimed relevance of a relational evaluation of women’s substantive representation. We conclude that the criterion of responsiveness is invaluable because it allows us to evaluate if actors’ claims to speak for women account for women’s capacity to speak for themselves.


Eline Severs
Eline Severs is postdoctoraal onderzoeker aan de Vakgroep Politieke Wetenschappen van de Vrije Universiteit Brussel en lid van RHEA, het Centrum voor Gender & Diversiteit (VUB). Ze is ook de wetenschappelijk coördinator van het Steunpunt Gelijke Kansenbeleid. Haar onderzoek spitst zich toe op vraagstukken van politieke vertegenwoordiging en vertegenwoordigende democratie (inclusie, legitimiteit en representativiteit).

Karen Celis
Karen Celis is als onderzoeksprofessor verbonden aan de Vakgroep Politieke Wetenschappen van de Vrije Universiteit Brussel en lid van RHEA, het Centrum voor Gender & Diversiteit van de Vrije Universiteit Brussel. Ze verricht theoretisch en empirisch onderzoek naar de politieke vertegenwoordiging van groepen, gelijkekansenbeleid en ‘staatsfeminisme’.

Petra Meier
Petra Meier is hoofddocent aan het Departement Politieke Wetenschappen van de Universiteit Antwerpen en promotor-coördinator van het Steunpunt Gelijke Kansenbeleid, een consortium van de vijf Vlaamse universiteiten. Haar onderzoek concentreert zich voornamelijk op de (re)presentatie van gender in politiek en beleid.
Article

Genderquota in de wetenschap, het bedrijfsleven en de rechterlijke macht in België

Journal Res Publica, Issue 3 2013
Keywords gender quotas, policy, science, business, judges
Authors Eva Schandevyl, Alison E. Woodward, Elke Valgaeren e.a.
AbstractAuthor's information

    Belgium is an early adapter of gender quotas to increase the presence of women in decision-making, as quotas for advisory councils and electoral politics date from the 1990’s. The advisory commission regulations had effects for research and scientific bodies, while the boards of publically funded corporations recently came into view. Notwithstanding many attempts, gender quotas have not (yet) been introduced in the higher regions of the justice system. This article investigates the lively scene of debates on Belgian quotas and comparatively explores the process of adopting quotas in science, business and justice. It focuses on the intensity of the debates, the arguments constituting the debate and the main actors driving it. The analysis demonstrates rich variation with respect to these three elements, which points to the importance of nuanced and context specific analyses when implementation processes of quotas in various sectors are studied.


Eva Schandevyl
Eva Schandevyl is deeltijds onderzoeksprofessor aan RHEA Onderzoekscentrum Gender & Diversiteit en het Departement Metajuridica van de Vrije Universiteit Brussel. Haar onderzoek heeft onder meer betrekking op intellectuele geschiedenis, vrouwenrechten en de geschiedenis van justitie.

Alison E. Woodward
Alison E. Woodward is hoogleraar aan het Departement Politieke Wetenschappen van de Vrije Universiteit Brussel, co-voorzitter van RHEA en Senior Fellow van The Institute for European Studies. Haar recent onderzoek behandelt de rol van het transnationale middenveld in de EU-crisis en gender in de besluitvorming.

Elke Valgaeren
Elke Valgaeren was op het ogenblik van de redactie van deze bijdrage operationeel directeur van het onderzoekscentrum SEIN – Identity, Diversity & Inequality Research, Universiteit Hasselt. Ze verrichtte er onderzoek naar diversiteit in het bedrijfsleven. Momenteel is ze diensthoofd van de studiedienst van de Gezinsbond.

Machteld De Metsenaere
Machteld De Metsenaere is gewoon hoogleraar aan de Faculteit Recht en Criminologie van de VUB en sinds 1992 directeur van RHEA. Haar onderzoek concentreert zich op gender (geschiedenis), geschiedenis van collaboratie en repressie, gelijke kansen en diversiteit.

Karen Celis
Karen Celis is als onderzoeksprofessor verbonden aan de Vakgroep Politieke Wetenschappen van de Vrije Universiteit Brussel en is lid van het RHEA Centrum voor Gender & Diversiteit. Ze verricht theoretisch en empirisch onderzoek naar de politieke vertegenwoordiging van groepen.

Sarah Childs
Sarah Childs is Professor of Politics and Gender aan de Universiteit van Bristol.
Article

De opkomstkloof tussen jongvolwassenen en ouderen in nationale verkiezingen

Een vergelijkend onderzoek

Journal Res Publica, Issue 1 2013
Keywords turnout, national elections, age gap, electoral competition, comparative research
Authors Kaat Smets
AbstractAuthor's information

    Recent research from Canada, Great Britain, and the United States indicates that turnout in national elections is declining rapidly among young adults. As a consequence of this trend, the age gap in voter turnout between younger and older voters widens. The aim of this paper is to understand whether similar patterns are observed in other Western democracies. Based on national election studies from eight European countries, Canada, and the United States, turnout patterns of younger and older citizens are traced and compared over the past decades. In a second step, a first attempt at explaining aggregate patterns is made. More specifically, the hypothesis that young people are particularly sensitive to the level of competitiveness between political parties is assessed. In low stake elections, turnout patterns of young citizens are expected to be relatively low. Therefore, declining turnout levels among young adults could be a sign of declining levels of political competitiveness. Nonetheless, multivariate analyses show that different measures of political competitiveness neither directly affect the age gap nor the turnout levels of young voters.


Kaat Smets
Kaat Smets is momenteel als postdoctoral fellow verbonden aan het Centre for the Study of Political Change (CIRCaP) van de Universiteit van Siena, Italië. Zij houdt zich bezig met diverse onderzoeksprojecten gericht op de publieke opinie. Haar onderzoeksinteresse gaat verder uit naar politiek gedrag, politieke socialisatie, politieke communicatie en vergelijkende politicologie en kwantitatieve onderzoekmethoden.

    In deze bijdrage wordt op experimentele wijze gezocht naar een antwoord op de vraag wat de rechtvaardiging is van de beperking van de handelingsbekwaamheid van de minderjarige en het het bewind over zijn vermogen. Bij wijze van experiment wordt een fictieve regeling in het leven geroepen, het zogenaamde tachtigplusbewind. Op grond van deze regeling wordt eenieder die de tachtigjarige leeftijd passeert van rechtswege beperkt in zijn handelingsbekwaamheid en verliest hij het bewind over zijn vermogen. Vervolgens wordt de vraag gesteld waarom een dergelijk tachtigplusbewind niet wenselijk is en de bescherminsgmaatregelen die minderjarigen treffen wel. Deze bijdrage is een onderdeel van een breder dissertatieonderzoek met als titel 'Minderjarigen en (de zorg voor hun) vermogen.'
    ---
    This contribution seeks, in an experimental manner, to find an answer to the question of what is the justification for restriction on the capacity of the minor and the administration of their assets. By way of experimentation, a fictitious arrangement is created, the so-called ‘eighty-plus-fiduciary-administration’. Under this scheme, anyone who is over the age of eighty will have their legal capacity limited, and lose control of their assets. The question then arises as to why this eighty plus rule is not desirable whilst the protective rules for minors are widely accepted. This contribution is part of a wider dissertation research entitled ‘Minors and (the care of) their assets’.


Mr. Hans ter Haar
Hans ter Haar is a lecturer in notarial law at the University of Groningen.
Article

Vertegenwoordigende claims en de substantiële vertegenwoordiging van vrouwen in de Kamer

Journal Res Publica, Issue 4 2011
Keywords political representation, representative claims, substantive representation of women, legislative behaviour
Authors Silvia Erzeel
AbstractAuthor's information

    Studies of women’s representation have often explored the link between women’s descriptive and women’s substantive representation in parliament, analyzing whether female representatives bring a unique – and often feminist – contribution to the representation of women’s interests. Doing so, however, these studies have failed to consider “how women’s substantive representation actually occurs” (Celis & Childs, 2008; Childs & Krook, 2009). Recent studies therefore propose to apply a claim-based framework, leaving open how, why and by whom women’s substantive representation occurs (Celis et al., 2008). In this article, we put this new claim-based approach to the empirical test. More in particular, we consider its added value by studying the variety of claims made about women in the Belgian Chamber of Representatives (1995-2007). We conclude that a claim-based framework indeed brings additional actors and perspectives to the fore, but that there are limits as to which claims are formulated and by whom.


Silvia Erzeel
Silvia Erzeel is doctoraatsstudente Politieke Wetenschappen aan de Vrije Universiteit Brussel. Haar onderzoek handelt over de descriptieve en substantiële vertegenwoordiging van vrouwen in parlementaire settings.

Daniel Schwarcz
Associate Professor of Law, University of Minnesota Law School. A version of this paper, titled Insurance Demand Anomalies and Regulation, was simultaneously published in the Journal of Consumer Affairs. For helpful comments and suggestions, I thank Ken Abraham, Tom Baker, Oren Bar-Gill, Prentiss Cox, Brenda Cude, Kristin Hickman, Claire Hill, Bert Kritzer, Brett McDonnell, Amy Monahan, Francesco Parisi, Arden Rowell, Steven Schwarcz, Peter Siegelman and Paul Slovic. I also thank the participants in Erasmus Law School's conference on Juxtaposing Autonomy and Paternalism in Private Law, the University of Minnesotas seminar on Alternative Perspective on Law and Economics and the National Bureau of Economic Research's Insurance Project Workshop. Christina Alexander and Carl Engstrom provided excellent research assistance.
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