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    Entities enjoying international legal personality are generally regarded as the “subjects” of general international law and international space law and are considered to possess rights and obligations under international law. While States have historically been recognised as the principal subjects of international law, non-State actors, such as international organisations, non-governmental entities, multinational corporations, and (arguably) individuals, are increasingly empowered with rights and subjected to obligations on the international plane. International space law, although embedded in general international law, contains unique principles and rules that are in some cases different from those of general international law. With the changing nature of activities due to technological developments, and the proliferation of actors in the space domain, it is necessary to critically examine the issues as to what are considered the subjects of international space law. This question is important both from the doctrinal perspective, and as a matter of practical relevance, as space activities are increasingly being undertaken by non-State actors under the jurisdiction and control of, or having a nexus with, several States.


Kuan-Wei Chen
K.W. Chen, Centre for Research in Air and Space Law, McGill University, Canada.

Ram Jakhu
R. Jakhu, Institute of Air and Space Law, McGill University, Canada.

Steven Freeland
S. Freeland, Western Sydney University, Australia.
Article

A Vital Artery or a Stent Needing Replacement?

A Global Space Governance System without the Outer Space Treaty?

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 4 2018
Authors Ram S. Jakhu and Steven Freeland
AbstractAuthor's information

    The 1967 Outer Space Treaty is the foundational framework of international space law that has succeeded in effectively governing outer space. However, it is becoming increasingly possible that a major space power, or a group of States, may consider withdrawing from the Outer Space Treaty, particularly in view of the current trend towards nationalistic political populism and isolationistic foreign policies to selectively withdraw from certain key international institutions and treaties. The Outer Space Treaty could be one such treaty, especially in relation to the exclusive national exploitation of space-based natural resources by private entities, and threats to national security. Such withdrawals would likely have serious implications for global space governance, which is essentially based on this Treaty. This paper critically addresses some of the most serious legal issues related to the void that such withdrawal might create in the prevailing international governance regime for outer space.


Ram S. Jakhu
Institute of Air and Space Law, McGill University, Montreal, Canada,ram.jakhu@mcgill.ca (corresponding author).

Steven Freeland
School of Law, Western Sydney University, Sydney, Australia, s.freeland@westernsydney.edu.au.
Article

Keeping Up with the Neighbours?

Reviewing National Space Laws to Account for New Technology – The Australian and Canadian Experience

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 4 2017
Authors Steven Freeland and Ram S. Jakhu
Author's information

Steven Freeland
Prof. Steven Freeland, Western Sydney University, Australia, s.freeland@westernsydney.edu.au.

Ram S. Jakhu
Prof. Ram S. Jakhu, McGill University, Canada, ram.jakhu@mcgill.ca.
Article

Some Legal Aspects of Space Natural Resources

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 1 2016
Keywords space law, space mining, private property rights, United States Space Law, United Nations Committee on Peaceful Uses of Outer Space
Authors Ram S. Jakhu and Yaw Otu Mankata Nyampong
AbstractAuthor's information

    Critical natural resources on the earth will be depleted before the close of this century. As such, humanity must explore for additional natural resources in places beyond the earth (i.e. in outer space and on other planets) in order to sustain life on earth. An appropriate international regulatory regime would be indispensable if such exploration is to succeed and result in the orderly exploitation of space natural resources. Presently, the international regulatory regime governing the exploration and potential exploitation of space natural resources is inadequate and lacks sufficient clarity. This article addresses some important legal aspects of the exploration and exploitation of space natural resources both from an international and a national perspective. Specifically, it analyzes the relevant provisions of the 1967 Outer Space Treaty and the 1979 Moon Agreement in addition to some recent regulatory developments occurring in the United States. Finally, it provides an outlook for the future legal regime that may be required to guarantee the orderly exploration and exploitation of space natural resources.


Ram S. Jakhu
Associate Professor, Institute of Air and Space Law, Faculty of Law, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.

Yaw Otu Mankata Nyampong
Senior Legal Officer, Pan African University, African Union Commission, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Ram S. Jakhu
Prof. Ram S. Jakhu, McGill University, Canada: ram.jakhu@mcgill.ca

Steven Freeland
Prof. Steven Freeland, Western Sydney University, Australia: s.freeland@westernsydney.edu.au

Steven Freeland
Western Sydney University, Australia

Ram S. Jakhu
Institute of Air and Space Law, McGill University, Canada

Steven Freeland
University of Western Sydney, Australia

Ram Jakhu
McGill University, Canada

Ram S. Jakhu
McGill University, Canada, ram.jakhu@mcgill.ca.

Steven Freeland
University of Western Sydney, Australia, s.freeland@uws.edu.au.

Prof. Ram S. Jakhu
LL.M., D.C.L. (McGill); Associate Professor, Institute of Air and Space Law, Faculty of Law, McGill University, Montreal, Canada; Member of Space Security Council of the World Economic Forum; Member of the Board of Directors, International Institute of Space Law, the Netherlands.

Prof. Steven Freeland
Professor of International Law, University of Western Sydney, Australia and Visiting Professor of International Law, University of Copenhagen, Denmark; Member of the Space Law Committee, International Law Association, London; Member of the Board of Directors, International Institute of Space Law, the Netherlands; Member of Faculty, London Institute of Space Policy and Law.
Article

Appropriateness of the Moon Agreement for Lunar Exploration and Use

Global Lunar Conference in Beijing, China: IISL Session

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 10 2010
Authors R. Jakhu, S. Hobe and S. Freeland

R. Jakhu

S. Hobe

S. Freeland
Article

Safety and Liability Aspects of Solar Power Satellites

Recent Developments in Space Law

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 5 2010
Authors R.S. Jakhu and D. Howard

R.S. Jakhu

D. Howard
Article

Regulation of Space Activities in Canada

Other Legal Matters I, Including Legal Aspects of Sub-Orbital Flights

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 3 2005
Authors R. Jakhu

R. Jakhu
Article

Legal Aspects of Space Tourism

The International Space Station and the Law

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 2 2002
Authors R. Jakhu and R. Bhattacharya

R. Jakhu

R. Bhattacharya
Article

Emerging Legal Issues of Satellite Telecommunications and Broadcasting

2000 IISL-ECSL Space Law Symposium Held on the Occasion of the 39th Session of the Legal Subcommittee of UNCOPUOS in Vienna, Austria: "Legal Aspects of Commercialisation of Space Activities"

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 5 2000
Authors R. Jakhu

R. Jakhu
Article

Application and Implementation of the 1967 Outer Space Treaty

1997 IISL-ECSL Space Law Symposium Held on the Occasion of the 36th Session of the Legal Subcommittee of UNCOPUOS in Vienna, Austria: "Celebrating the 30th Anniversary of the Outer Space Treaty"

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 5 1997
Authors R.S. Jakhu

R.S. Jakhu
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