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Roger Dujardin
Vice Président de l'Union Internationale des Huissiers de Justice et des Officiers Judiciaires (UIHJ) - huissier de justice à Anvers (Belgique).

Catherine Kessedjian
Professeur, Université Panthéon-Assas, Paris II.

Jean-Bernard Auby
Professeur de Droit Public à Sciences Po Paris, Directeur de la Chaire “Mutations de l'Action Publique et du Droit Public.”

Lord Steyn
A Lord of Appeal in Ordinary from 1995 - 2005; now a member of Essex Court Chambers, 24 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2.

John A. E. Vervaele
Professor of economic and financial criminal law, Utrecht Law School and Professor of European criminal law, Europa College Bruges. The basic research for this article was carried out during an Adjunct Professorship at the American Law School of the American University in Washington DC (May-July 2003). The research has been updated up until 1 November 2006. This version is a shortened and updated version of J. A. E. Vervaele, The Anti-Terrorist Legislation in the US: Inter Arma Silent Leges? 13 European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice 201 (2005).

Jan Lokin
Professor of Roman Law, Faculty of Law, University of Groningen.

Guy Canivet
Premier président de la Cour de cassation française.

Esin Örücü
Professorial Research Fellow and Professor Emerita of Comparative Law, University of Glasgow and Professor Emerita of Comparative Law, Erasmus Universiteit, Rotterdam.

Deirdre Curtin
Professor of International and European Governance, University of Utrecht, The Netherlands. This text constitutes a reworked version of a keynote lecture given at the World Congress of Comparative Law in Utrecht on 17 July 2006.

Andrea Schulz
First Secretary at the Permanent Bureau of the Hague Conference on Private International Law. Since the beginning of 2002, the author has been in charge of the negotiations which led to the Convention on Choice of Court Agreements. This article is an updated reprint of an earlier publication by the same author, The Hague Convention of 30 June 2005 on Choice of Court Agreements, VII Yearbook of Private International Law 1 (2005).

Niek Zaman
Professor of Law, University of Utrecht.

Gábor Hamza
Professor of Law at the Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest. This article is based on his inaugural lecture delivered on 6 October 2004 at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

Levent Gonenc
Ankara University, Faculty of Law; leventgonenc@yahoo.com.

Selin Esen
Ankara University, Faculty of Political Sciences; selin.essen@politics.ankara.edu.tr.

Ole Lando
Professor of Law, Copenhagen Business School; Chairman of the Commission on European Contract Law.

Saulė Voluckytė
LL.B., (Concordia International University Estonia), M.A.E.S., (Europa Institut, University of Basel). Formerly Chief Legal Officer, European Law Department under the Government of Lithuania. Lecturer, Mykolas Romeris University, Vilnius. The author would like to thank the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - Juriscope in France and its team - Prof. Jacques David, Dr. Daniela Borcan and Dr. Zhuang Han. This study was undertaken at the request of French Ministry of Justice made through the research centre.

Igor Volner
Legal Counsel, Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics, Oslo, Norway. LL.B. University of Zagreb (Croatia), LL.M. University of Oslo (Norway). This article is based on my LL.M. thesis prepared at the Scandinavian Institute of Maritime Law, Oslo. The author would like to express his gratitude to Prof. Erik Røsæg, University of Oslo, for his guidance and support. Many thanks also to: Prof. Siniša Petrović, Linda Haavik, Karl-Johan Gombrii, Prof. Frank Emmert, Dr. Jasenko Marin, Prof. Vesna Tomljenović and Liv Bente Tiedemann for their helpful comments

    This article is based on a definition of political and civil servant leadership as a behavioral steering style towards the realization of organizational goals. By means of a grounded theory methodology we get some insights in the characteristics and the interaction between both leadership styles in Flemish cities. This two-faced leadership is depicted by means of a tandem metaphor. First, we identify the relevant dimensions to describe the leadership tandem. It becomes apparent that political leadership styles differ greatly both in time and in scope. Civil servant leadership is generally characterized by a weak but presumably growing impact. This combination results in considerable leadership tensions, which is reinforced by several contingency factors: i.e. the influence of the dominant alderman model, the financial situation, the number of staff, the tendency to professionalize, the dominant political and civil servant culture and the structure of central government (e.g. on a Flemish, Belgian and European level).


Nathalie Vallet
Docent aan het Departement Management van de Universiteit Antwerpen en aan de Master in Publiek Management van de Universiteit Antwerpen Management School (UAMS).

Filip De Rynck
Hoogleraar aan het Departement Handelswetenschappen en Bestuurskunde van de Hogeschool Gent en docent aan de Master in Publiek Management van de Universiteit Antwerpen Management School (UAMS).
Article

Stille revolutie, contra-revolutie of cultureel conflict?

Veranderingen in de politieke cultuur en hun invloed op het verband tussen klassenpositie en stemgedrag

Journal Res Publica, Issue 4 2006
Authors Jeroen Van der Waal and Peter Achterberg
AbstractAuthor's information

    This paper deals with the linkage between changes in the political culture and changes in class-party alignments. First, we investigate how the political culture in Western countries has changed over time. Three views are tested using data on party-manifestos. The first predicts that only new-leftist issues will increase in salience. The second predicts that both new-leftist and new-rightist issues will emerge at the same time. The third, which is empirically corroborated, predicts that first new-leftist issues will emerge followed by a rise in new rightist issues.
    Second, we investigate how the emergence of these new issues has affected the traditional class-party alignments. We show that the middle class increasingly votes left-wing as newleftist issues become more important and that the working class increasingly votes rightwing as new-rightist issues become more important. The middle class also appears to alienate from the traditional party of their class as new-rightist issues rise in salience.


Jeroen Van der Waal
Onderzoeker aan de vakgroep Sociologie, Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam en aan de Amsterdam School for Social Research.

Peter Achterberg
Onderzoeker aan de vakgroep Sociologie, Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam en aan de Amsterdam School for Social Research.

    This study reports the results of qualitative interviews with 28 extreme right wing activists in Flanders (Belgium). We focus on the (ideological) motives for activism (why did they become active?) and the trajectory followed in becoming active (how did they become active?). The results show that these activists are primarily motivated by ethnic nationalism. All other ideological stands (e.g. rejection of foreigners, authoritarian attitudes and rejection of actual politics in Belgium) seem to be derived from this core of ethnic nationalism. The trajectory followed is primarily one that relates to socialization and continuity: most interviewees grew up in a family in which nationalism was of primordial importance. A minority of respondents, however, followed trajectories that refer to compliance or to conversion (deprivation).


Hans De Witte
Hoofddocent aan het Departement Psychologie, K.U.Leuven.
Article

Op zoek naar de ‘monitorial citizen’

Een empirisch onderzoek naar de prevalentie van postmodern burgerschap in België

Journal Res Publica, Issue 4 2006
Authors Yves Dejaeghere and Marc Hooghe
AbstractAuthor's information

    Various authors have claimed that postmodern concepts of citizenship have become more important in contemporary Western societies. The new generation of citizens are said to be more critical toward the political system, less likely to participate in conventional politics, but they remain strongly interested in politics and social life (Norris, Inglehart, Dalton). Michael Schudson developed the concept of a ‘monitorial citizen’, who is interested in politics, with high levels of political efficacy and who turns to political action if needed, but does not participate in traditional political organizations. Based on the European Social Survey (2004) we investigate whether this type of citizenship actually occurs in Belgium, and found that approx. 9 per cent of all respondents can be labeled as ‘monitorial citizens’. In accordance with the theoretical expectations, most of them are young and highly-educated citizens. A multivariate analysis shows that, controlling for education, ‘monitorial citizens’ also score relatively high on political trust.


Yves Dejaeghere
Licentiaat politieke wetenschappen, Centrum voor Politicologie K.U.Leuven.

Marc Hooghe
Hoofddocent politieke wetenschappen, Centrum voor Politicologie K.U.Leuven.
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