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ECJ Court Watch

ECJ 21 December 2016, case C-539/15 (Bowman), Age discrimination

Daniel Bowman – v – Pensionsversicherungsanstalt, Austrian case

Journal European Employment Law Cases, Issue 1 2017
Keywords Discrimination
Abstract

    Requiring staff to complete five service years before progressing from the first to the second step on the salary scale, but requiring only two service years for each next step, is not age-discriminatory.

ECJ Court Watch

ECJ 1 December 2016, case C-395/15 (Daouidi), Discrimination

Mohamed Daouidi – v – Bootes Plus SL, Fondo de GarantíaSalarial and Ministerio Fiscal, Spanish case

Journal European Employment Law Cases, Issue 1 2017
Keywords Discrimination
Abstract

    A ‘temporary’ inability to work may qualify as a ‘long-term’ limitation within the meaning of the ECJ’s case law on Directive 2000/78. Whether this is the case is for the national court to determine. The court may take into account that it is not clear how long the person may take to recover.

ECJ Court Watch

ECJ 21 September 2016, case C-614/15 (Popescu), Fixed-term employment

Rodica Popescu – v – Directia Sanitar Veterinara si pentru Siguranta Alimentelor Gorj

Journal European Employment Law Cases, Issue 4 2016
Keywords Fixed-term work
Abstract

    The fact that veterinary health inspections are non-permanent in nature does not justify successive fixed-term contracts unless the renewal of those contracts is in fact aimed at covering a specific need in the relevant sector, without the underlying reason being budgetary considerations.

ECJ Court Watch

ECJ 14 September 2016, joined cases C-184/15 (Martínez Andrés) and C-197/15 (Castrejana López), Fixed-term work

Florentina Matínez Andrés – v – Servicio Vasco de Salud and Juan Carlos Castrejana López – v – Ayuntamiento de Vitoria

Journal European Employment Law Cases, Issue 4 2016
Keywords Fixed-term work
Abstract

    The penalty for abuse of successive fixed-term contracts must be available to all victims of such abuse, including those employed under administrative, rather than employment, law. National law may not require a victim to bring a new action before a different court in order to determine the penalty.

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