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Human Rights Practice Review

The Czech Republic

Journal East European Yearbook on Human Rights, Issue 1 2020
Authors Viktor Kundrák and Maroš Matiaško
Author's information

Viktor Kundrák
Viktor Kundrák works for the OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR) as a Hate Crime Officer. He is also a PhD candidate at Charles University in Prague. The views in this article are his own and do not necessarily represent those of ODIHR.

Maroš Matiaško
Maroš Matiaško is a PhD candidate at Palacky University and Essex University. He is a chair of the Forum for Human Rights (NGO based in Prague) and human rights attorney at law.
Article

The Question of Jurisdiction

The Impact of Ultra Vires Decisions on the ECJ’s Normative Power and Potential Effects for the Field of Data Protection

Journal East European Yearbook on Human Rights, Issue 1 2020
Keywords ECJ, German Constitutional Court, principle of proportionality, primacy of EU law, data protection, principle of conferral, ultra vires judgments
Authors Carsten M. Wulff
AbstractAuthor's information

    The ultra vires judgment of the German Constitutional Court on the debt security purchasing of the ECB system sent shockwaves throughout Europe. Some scholars see the legal framework, specifically the principle of the supremacy of the European Union in danger. This article argues that the judgment is a challenge for Luxembourg; however, there have been warning signs from the Czech Republic and Denmark that constitutional courts will not shy away from criticizing, when the ECJ oversteps its jurisdiction. The author argues that the judgment may weaken the overall normative power of the court and will assess whether a similar judgment could occur in the field of data protection and national security exceptions. The only way back to normality will be for the court to ensure it does not overstep its jurisdiction and the European Institutions unconditionally backing the ECJ in the expected upcoming conflict with the constitutional courts of Member States.


Carsten M. Wulff
PhD Student, Tallinn University, Estonia.
Human Rights Practice Review

Poland

Journal East European Yearbook on Human Rights, Issue 1 2020
Authors Vita Czepek and Jakub Czepek
Author's information

Vita Czepek
Dr Vita Czepek, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Law and Administration, Department of International Public Law.

Jakub Czepek
Dr Jakub Czepek, Cardinal Stefan Wyszyński University in Warsaw, Faculty of Law and Administration, Department of Human Rights Protection and International Humanitarian Law.
Article

Access_open States of Emergency

Analysing Global Use of Emergency Powers in Response to COVID-19

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 4 2020
Keywords coronavirus, emergency law, emergency powers, autocratization, democratic deconsolidation, state of emergency, rule of law, transparency, accountability, legislative scrutiny
Authors Joelle Grogan
AbstractAuthor's information

    The measures taken in response to the coronavirus pandemic have been among the most restrictive in contemporary history, and have raised concerns from the perspective of democracy, human rights, and the rule of law. Building on a study of the legal measures taken in response to pandemic in 74 countries, this article considers the central question of the use of power during an emergency: is it better or worse for democracy and the rule of law to declare an emergency or, instead, to rely on ordinary powers and legislative frameworks? The article then considers whether the use of powers (ordinary or emergency) in response to the pandemic emergency has ultimately been a cause, or catalyst of, further democratic deconsolidation. It concludes on a note of optimism: an emerging best practice of governmental response reliant on public trust bolstered by rationalized and transparent decision-making and the capacity to adapt, change and reform measures and policies.


Joelle Grogan
Dr. Joelle Grogan is Senior Lecturer in Law, Middlesex University London.
Article

A New Format for Space Law?

12th Nandasiri Jasentuliyana Keynote Lecture

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 1 2020
Authors Stephan Hobe
Author's information

Stephan Hobe
Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. Stephan Hobe, LL.M. is Director of the Institute of Air Law, Space Law and Cyber Law and Holder of the Chair for Public Internation Law, European Law, European and International Economic Law at the University of Cologne; Chair of the ILA Committee on Space Law; Chair of the IISL Directorate of Studies and Board Member of the European Centre for Space Law.
Article

Space Heritage: International Legal Aspects of Its Protection

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 1 2020
Keywords space heritage, cultural heritage, UNESCO, space law
Authors Vladimir Savelev and Albert Khayrutdinov
AbstractAuthor's information

    The increasing involvement of States in the process of research and use of outer space, as well as the steady development of technical capabilities of space-faring commercial entities, entails a serious growth in the number of space flights. This may adversely affect the physical integrity and safety of the objects, which can be considered as space heritage for their undoubtful significance in the history of humanity. An international legal regime for a protection of such objects does not exist today. That is why necessity to analyse and summarize possible international legal aspects of the protection of historical and cultural heritage in outer space and on celestial bodies has grown and becomes the purpose of this paper. The proposed thesis will consist of 3 chapters except introduction and conclusion. The first chapter will examine the features of the legal status of ‘space heritage’. The second chapter will refer to existing practice of national initiatives into the preservation of space heritage. Thereby, the most vivid example in the field of State’s practice will be non-binding document, ‘NASA’s Recommendations to Space-Faring Entities: How to Protect and Preserve the Historic and Scientific Value of U.S. Government Lunar Artifacts’, which aims to preserve the U.S. artifacts on lunar surface. Another example is the bill ‘One Small Step to Protect Human Heritage in Space Act’, which aims to protect the historic Apollo 11 landing sites. The last chapter will examine the different paths to establish appropriate protection of space heritage at the international level.


Vladimir Savelev
Vladimir Savelev, Рeoples’ Friendship University of Russia (RUDN University).

Albert Khayrutdinov
Albert Khayrutdinov, National University of Science and Technology (MISiS).
Article

Back to the Future: Roman Law and Ownership of Objects Created on Celestial Bodies

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 2 2020
Keywords extraterrestrial settlement, Moon colony, Mars colony, ownership, Roman law, principle of specification
Authors Gabrielle Leterre
AbstractAuthor's information

    This contribution analyses the gap left by Article VIII of the Outer Space Treaty in matters involving ownership of objects created on celestial bodies and suggests leveraging the Roman law principle of specification to bridge it. Article VIII provides a clear provision: “ownership of objects launched into outer space, including objects landed or constructed on a celestial body, and their component parts is not affected by their presence in outer space or on a celestial body …”. Ownership of an object created in space is therefore possible as long as its ownership was established on Earth. Unfortunately, it leaves open the crucial question for space activities of ownership of objects made of local resources like lunar soil, which have legally no owner. In this case, the specification principle, which has broad application through most national (terrestrial) legal orders, can provide a regime of ownership by stating that created objects belong to the creator when created out of another’s article.


Gabrielle Leterre
Gabrielle Leterre, University of Luxembourg with the support of the Luxembourg National Research Fund (FNR).
Article

Compromise, Commonhold and the Common Heritage of Mankind

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 2 2020
Keywords commonhold, property, real estate, common heritage of mankind, colonization
Authors Chelsey Denney
AbstractAuthor's information

    This paper addresses the limitations that conflicting approaches to celestial property rights place upon the development of settlements on the Moon and Mars. It does not seek to engage in the ongoing debate about the legitimacy of private property rights in outer space. Instead, the focus is on providing an alternative method of ownership that would enable the existence of private property, whilst protecting the right of all nations to be involved in the management of a territory seen by many as the “Common heritage of mankind”. It is argued this compromise would be best achieved through a modified version of Commonhold, a system of property ownership currently used within England and Wales. The premise of Commonhold being that although owners possess the freehold title to their property, there is a shared ownership of, and responsibility for, common areas. It is proposed that a comparable system could be constructed for use within this context, with representatives from each interested country able to discuss and vote upon a number of issues relating to the management of celestial territory. This model would also facilitate the inclusion of covenants, such as a stewardship covenant, ensuring owners used their land in a sustainable way. By guaranteeing that some areas remain commonly owned, it safeguards the right of all nations to use and benefit in some way from celestial territories. Further, the credibility of a model involving multinational cooperation and management would be demonstrated by a comparison between the management committee proposed here, and the European Council and Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meetings. Ultimately, it is concluded that Commonhold provides, if not a perfect solution, at least a base upon which to work.


Chelsey Denney
Chelsey Denney, chelseydenney@icloud.com.
Article

Charting a Human Rights Framework for Outer Space Settlements

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 2 2020
Keywords rule of law, human rights, governance, sustainability, space law
Authors Jonathan Lim
AbstractAuthor's information

    The advancing commercialization and democratization of access to space requires a reconceptualization of the foundational principles and values offered by international human rights law (IHRL) to the specific technical, physiological, and legal challenges of outer space. The notion of human rights seeks to establish and safeguard the dignity and value of every human being – it is inherent, broad, and aims to promote tolerance, equality and respect in reducing conflict across diverse and isolated human communities. Technological advancements have given rise to novel and unanticipated human rights concerns in an era where the development of the law lags behind technology. Human rights offer a multitude of benefits conducive to the advancement of prolonged human habitation and activities in outer space. Determining what novel fundamental human rights are required in the context of space requires and understanding premised upon human dignity, respect, and fairness – as underpinned by their relation to human health, safety, wellbeing, and dignity.


Jonathan Lim
Jonathan Lim, Jus Ad Astra.

    There is currently a gap in space law that has had a detrimental effect on private activity in outer space. Article II of the Outer Space Treaty prohibits appropriation. The Moon Treaty includes a process for overriding that prohibition (an implementation agreement (IA) under Article 11), but most countries have not adopted it because it uses the term “Common Heritage of Mankind”. But the CHM has no independent legal meaning; it is whatever the implementation agreement says it is. Both the ban on appropriation and the concerns about the CHM are addressed by the Model Implementation Agreement. Without an IA, everyone fears the worst. But if the specific language of an IA is agreed to beforehand, then countries could adopt the Moon Treaty while being assured that they are protecting their national interests.


Dennis O’Brien
Dennis O’Brien, President, The Space Treaty Project, Ukiah, CA/USA; email: dennisobrien@spacetreaty.org.
Article

Data Law Aspects of Commercial Satellite Remote Sensing: New Challenges for the New Opportunities

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 3 2020
Keywords commercial satellite remote sensing, satellite data, personal data law, platform
Authors Souichirou Kozuka and Mayu Terada
AbstractAuthor's information

    As the commercial satellite remote sensing has grown to bear the typical features of data industry, the relevance of data law to this industry sector has become apparent. However, the data law differs significantly from one jurisdiction to another. The difference is especially big with regard to the regulation on profiling. Given such feature of data law, it should be crucial that the data law does not undermine the internationally recognised principle of the freedom of remote sensing activities, pronounced in the United Nations Principles of Satellite Remote Sensing. It is the cause of difficulties that the commercial satellite remote sensing faces, because the satellite data most likely threatens the personal privacy when used as part of the “big data” and identifies a person through profiling. One possible solution may be to interpret and implement the data law in a manner that least compromises the principles on satellite remote sensing developed by the space law. Another, more practical solution is to develop private arrangements, requiring the data provider to guarantee compliance with the relevant data law, as well as indicating the standardised conditions for trade in data on the platform. Lawyers should find the way to respect both the space law and data law and ensure that the “free flow of data with trust” is realised for satellite data.


Souichirou Kozuka
Souichirou Kozuka, Faculty of law, Gakushuin University.

Mayu Terada
Mayu Terada, Department of Politics and International Studies, International Christian University.
Article

The 1986 United Nations Principles on Remote Sensing Dealing with the Dual-Use Nature of Space Imagery

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 3 2020
Keywords remote sensing principles, international space law, national space law, data access, dissemination, dual-use, national interests
Authors Anne-Sophie Martin
AbstractAuthor's information

    The 1986 United Nations Principles on Remote Sensing represent a fundamental tool within the international legal regime governing space activities. Indeed, they provide a set of non-binding provisions to guide States willing to conduct remote sensing activities. The paper considers these Principles in light of the dual-use nature of remote sensing technology and products, as well as given the “democratisation” of the use of Earth observation data. Nowadays, remote sensing satellites are operated in many civil, commercial and military applications. In this context, it is necessary to examine the scope of the Principles in order to figure out whether the current legal framework is appropriate, in particular given the dual-use nature of satellite imagery. In addition, some legal issues arise with regard to access to and processing of data which are generated by the private sector for governmental and military uses. In fact, it is now possible to extract military information from commercial and civil Earth observation programmes. So far, the Principles have continued to prove their value and usefulness. However, they do not have been reviewed, especially as regards the technological development of space systems and the evolution of data distribution. Lastly, the paper aims to analyse the Principles by taking into account the rule of access to EO data without discrimination but nevertheless limited for national security reasons.


Anne-Sophie Martin
Dr. Anne-Sophie Martin, Department of Political Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 5, 00185, Rome, RM (Italy) martin.annesophie@yahoo.fr.
Article

Domestic Legislation and Challenges Related to Outer Space Laws in Pakistan

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 5 2020
Keywords lawmaking process, treaty implementation, national space policy, civil space agency, national space regime, Pakistan space program
Authors Shakeel Ahmad
AbstractAuthor's information

    In Pakistan, there exists valuable technical and entrepreneurial capability that could be used to take full advantage of space benefits for national economic development. However, the country has not yet become a full spacefaring nation as compared to some other States. At national level, there is a strong realization to uplift national space program and many initiatives are being taken. However, lack of political will, interest in space related public policies are the main hindrances to formulate national space laws. The existing general national laws of Pakistan are somewhat relevant to outer space exploration and use, however, lack in full and systematic support of new developments as compared to various spacefaring nations. These are the challenges that must be addressed by Pakistan in order to legislate and to revisit its present structure, both legislative and decision-making, for outer space activities. This paper critically analyzes the domestic legislative hurdles and challenges with a view of recommending the adoption of relevant national laws and regulations in order to develop and sustain a full space economy as well as to implement Pakistan’s international obligations, in line with some other States.


Shakeel Ahmad
Shakeel Ahmad, Erin J.C. Arsenault Research Fellow, Institute of Air and Space Law, McGill University; email: shakeel.ahmad@mcgill.ca. Author has also served as a focal person for Centre of International Law at NDU, Islamabad, Pakistan.

    This paper addresses the issue of cybersecurity in the context of the space environment and discusses, from a legal perspective, what it means for a space operator to be cyber-secure. This paper will argue that cybersecurity law should be understood as a governance framework constructed from a variety of documents that includes traditional legal documents, but that also relies on policies, technical standards, and technical specifications. This paper will then discuss how a lawyer is supposed “do” cybersecurity for space clients, in particular when the law itself is difficult to pinpoint.


P.J. Blount
SES / University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg, pjblount@gmail.com. The views expressed in this paper are the author’s own and do not represent the views of his employer or any organizations with which he is affiliated. This research is made possible by a generous Industrial Fellowship grant from the Luxembourg National Research Fund.
Article

Does the End Justify the Means?

A Legal Study on the Role and Consequences of Normative Pluralism in International Space Governance

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 6 2020
Keywords space law, space governance, normative pluralism, soft law, national space law
Authors Alexander Soucek and Jenni Tapio
AbstractAuthor's information

    The exploration and use of outer space, an area beyond national jurisdiction, is subject to international legal norms: a multilateral effort since more than half a century. However, the pressure on solutions facilitated or enabled by public international law is augmenting, not least because of new space actors, novel ideas to use and explore outer space and the increasingly ubiquitous concern of maintaining the long-term sustainability of spaceflight. Different actors produce standards, best practices, guidelines and other governance tools; beyond COPUOS, various initiatives of different character by industry and other actors have emerged, in particular in the area of sustainable uses of outer space. This article explores the place and effects of normative pluralism and non-legally binding norms of behaviour in global space governance from a perspective of international law.


Alexander Soucek
Alexander Soucek, European Space Agency (ESA), Paris, France/Noordwijk, the Netherlands, alexander.soucek@esa.int.

Jenni Tapio
Jenni Tapio, Ministry of Economic Affairs and Employment of Finland, Finland, jenni.tapio@helsinki.fi.

    States apply different material conditions to attract or restrict residence of certain types of migrants. But states can also make use of time as an instrument to design more welcoming or more restrictive policies. States can apply faster application procedures for desired migrants. Furthermore, time can be used in a more favourable way to attract desired migrants in regard to duration of residence, access to a form of permanent residence and protection against loss of residence. This contribution makes an analysis of how time is used as an instrument in shaping migration policy by the European Union (EU) legislator in the context of making migration more or less attractive. This analysis shows that two groups are treated more favourably in regard to the use of time in several aspects: EU citizens and economic- and knowledge-related third-country nationals. However, when it comes to the acquisition of permanent residence after a certain period of time, the welcoming policy towards economic- and knowledge-related migrants is no longer obvious.


Gerrie Lodder
Gerrie Lodder is lecturer and researcher at the Europa Institute of Leiden University.
Article

Access_open The Potential of Positive Obligations Against Romaphobic Attitudes and in the Development of ‘Roma Pride’

Journal Erasmus Law Review, Issue 3 2020
Keywords Roma, Travellers, positive obligations, segregation, culturally adequate accommodation
Authors Lilla Farkas and Theodoros Alexandridis
AbstractAuthor's information

    The article analyses the jurisprudence of international tribunals on the education and housing of Roma and Travellers to understand whether positive obligations can change the hearts and minds of the majority and promote minority identities. Case law on education deals with integration rather than cultural specificities, while in the context of housing it accommodates minority needs. Positive obligations have achieved a higher level of compliance in the latter context by requiring majorities to tolerate the minority way of life in overwhelmingly segregated settings. Conversely, little seems to have changed in education, where legal and institutional reform, as well as a shift in both majority and minority attitudes, would be necessary to dismantle social distance and generate mutual trust. The interlocking factors of accessibility, judicial activism, European politics, expectations of political allegiance and community resources explain jurisprudential developments. The weak justiciability of minority rights, the lack of resources internal to the community and dual identities among the Eastern Roma impede legal claims for culture-specific accommodation in education. Conversely, the protection of minority identity and community ties is of paramount importance in the housing context, subsumed under the right to private and family life.


Lilla Farkas
Lilla Farkas is a practising lawyer in Hungary and recently earned a PhD from the European University Institute entitled ‘Mobilising for racial equality in Europe: Roma rights and transnational justice’. She is the race ground coordinator of the European Union’s Network of Legal Experts in Gender Equality and Non-discrimination.

Theodoros Alexandridis
Theodoros Alexandridis is a practicing lawyer in Greece.

    The entry into force of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) pushed state obligations to counter prejudice and stereotypes concerning people with disabilities to the forefront of international human rights law. The CRPD is underpinned by a model of inclusive equality, which views disability as a social construct that results from the interaction between persons with impairments and barriers, including attitudinal barriers, that hinder their participation in society. The recognition dimension of inclusive equality, together with the CRPD’s provisions on awareness raising, mandates that states parties target prejudice and stereotypes about the capabilities and contributions of persons with disabilities to society. Certain human rights treaty bodies, including the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and, to a much lesser extent, the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women, require states to eradicate harmful stereotypes and prejudice about people with disabilities in various forms of interpersonal relationships. This trend is also reflected, to a certain extent, in the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights. This article assesses the extent to which the aforementioned human rights bodies have elaborated positive obligations requiring states to endeavour to change ‘hearts and minds’ about the inherent capabilities and contributions of people with disabilities. It analyses whether these bodies have struck the right balance in elaborating positive obligations to eliminate prejudice and stereotypes in interpersonal relationships. Furthermore, it highlights the convergences or divergences that are evident in the bodies’ approaches to those obligations.


Andrea Broderick
Andrea Broderick is Assistant Professor at the Universiteit Maastricht, the Netherlands.
Article

Access_open State Obligations to Counter Islamophobia: Comparing Fault Lines in the International Supervisory Practice of the HRC/ICCPR, the ECtHR and the AC/FCNM

Journal Erasmus Law Review, Issue 3 2020
Keywords Human rights, positive state obligations, islamophobia, international supervisory mechanisms
Authors Kristin Henrard
AbstractAuthor's information

    Islamophobia, like xenophobia, points to deep-seated, ingrained discrimination against a particular group, whose effective enjoyment of fundamental rights is impaired. This in turn triggers the human rights obligations of liberal democratic states, more particularly states’ positive obligations (informed by reasonability considerations) to ensure that fundamental rights are effectively enjoyed, and thus also respected in interpersonal relationships. This article identifies and compares the fault lines in the practice of three international human rights supervisory mechanisms in relation to Islamophobia, namely the Human Rights Committee (International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights), the European Court of Human Rights (European Convention on Human Rights) and the Advisory Committee of the Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities. The supervisory practice is analysed in two steps: The analysis of each international supervisory mechanism’s jurisprudence, in itself, is followed by the comparison of the fault lines. The latter comparison is structured around the two main strands of strategies that states could adopt in order to counter intolerance: On the one hand, the active promotion of tolerance, inter alia through education, awareness-raising campaigns and the stimulation of intercultural dialogue; on the other, countering acts informed by intolerance, in terms of the prohibition of discrimination (and/or the effective enjoyment of substantive fundamental rights). Having regard to the respective strengths and weaknesses of the supervisory practice of these three international supervisory mechanisms, the article concludes with some overarching recommendations.


Kristin Henrard
Kristin Henrard is Professor International Human Rights and Minorities, Erasmus School of Law, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

Kristin Henrard
Kristin Henrard is Professor International Human Rights and Minorities, Erasmus School of Law, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
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