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    This paper analyzes, on the one hand, the legitimate expectations and needs of the industries in terms of intellectual property protection for outer space research, as they need to be protected against violations and be free to grant exploitation licenses. On the other hand, it investigates if the use and exploitation of outer space and celestial bodies is carried out for the benefit and in the interest of all countries.
    The key issue of the protection of inventions in accordance with national and international regulations will also be addressed in the paper.
    The paper will start from a combined analysis of art. 5 of the IGA, establishing that each Partner shall retain jurisdiction and control over the elements it registers, and art. 21 of the IGA, which regulates intellectual property based on the quasi-territorial principle, and sets out that the regulations of the State in whose registered modules the invention occurs shall apply. The paper aims to examine national intellectual property protection regulations, highlighting possible conflicts of applicable national laws with respect to the place where the invention occurs and inventor nationality, but also regarding the recognition of the different patent systems adopted by ISS Partner States. European Partner States enjoy a privileged position, as set forth by paragraph 2 of art. 21 of the IGA.
    As the unique environment of the ISS calls for quick recognition of intellectual property licenses obtained in other Partner States, the paper will analyze the different Partners’ national legislation, existing International Conventions on the matter, such as the TRIPS Agreement, and European patent regulations, which streamline procedures and introduce stringent minimum protection standards in all the areas of intellectual property.


Gabriella Catalano Sgrosso
University of Rome, Italy, sgrossogabriella@gmail.com.

    1. The main question of my research is “who will possess the intellectual property rights of remote sensing images, obtained from observation satellites, analyzed through big data analysis conducted by A.I.”
      In consideration of this theme, I am aiming to organize the following controversial points which may arise from the sale of satellite data:

      1. Intellectual property rights attributed to raw data;

      2. Copyright of the results of A.I. data analysis; and

      3. Rights (copyright and patent rights) of the firms that create the algorithms.

    2. To further examine this issue, I begin by discussing two topics from intellectual property law and international space law perspective:

      1. Points of contention regarding the attribution of copyright for satellite data extracted from observation satellites; and

      2. The idea of “the denial of preferential access right for the remote sensing data of surveyee’s countries” which was provided in the 1986 Remote Sensing Principles.

    3. In addition to the above, I aim to highlight areas that may be problematic in this new era for the space industry, as well as notable points for business players, by superimposing data analytic methodology with a discussion of the rights of A.I. deliverables. The aim of this paper is to integrate a space law issue (rights of remote sensing images) with an intellectual property law issue (with an emphasis on traditional issues as well as A.I. rights).

    4. To conclude, I will highlight certain opinions from a legislative perspective and emphasize the importance of critical importance of strategic contractual coverage of these issues.


Mihoko Shintani
TMI Associates.

    The majority of the world still does not have access to the internet, and this “digital divide” is not only an issue in developing countries. Unconnected populations exist in every country, and regulators must find ways to provide universal access to the internet. Furthermore, the demand for connectivity (internet and data) is growing exponentially, and existing terrestrial solutions likely will be insufficient. Regulators must foster new technologies such as the newest non-geostationary satellite constellations, which have almost no delay for two-way voice and data connections and can provide broadband to the most remote and unconnected populations and industries. To ensure the fast deployment of these solutions, regulators should support technology-neutral regulations (such as blanket licensing) that encourage speedy rollout of innovative services, as well as have transparent “open skies” policies that promote competition (which has been proven to boost economies).


Ruth Pritchard-Kelly
Vice President of Regulatory Affairs, OneWeb.
Article

Legal Challenges of Space 4.0

The Framework Conditions of Legal Certainty among States, International Organisations and Private Actors in the Changing Landscape of Space Activities

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 1 2018
Keywords Space 4.0, NewSpace, ESA, Capacity Building, Cyber Security, Legal Challenges
Authors Gina Petrovici and Antonio Carlo
AbstractAuthor's information

    After more than 60 years of space activities, ongoing scientific and technological progress alongside increased international cooperation, Space 4.0 is entering this field, leaving its hallmark on what appears a new era of space activities. The space community is rapidly changing, and the world continues to face a growing need for dedicated space applications. The growing interest in space leads to an increasing participation of numerous new actors. Governments, private actors and international organisations are eager to fill these gaps in securing the global society’s needs. ESA’s efforts in this regard are reflected in the Space 4.0 concept, introduced at ESA’s Ministerial Council in December 2016 by the ESA Director General. This new conception – building on Industry 4.0 – is designed to host a new era of space activities, setting out to tackle global challenges using the advantages deriving from space and technological progress. These challenges range from climate change to shortage of resources, health, demographic development, digital divide and more. ESA is also highly active within UNISPACE and its objectives: space accessibility, economy, security and diplomacy to contribute to Space 2030 and the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Capacity building reflects the core objective of all international Space 4.0 efforts. This rapid changes and growth are meeting certain needs by bringing space closer to society and inspiring new generations. However, as these developments are taking place in a highly complex net of legal, regulatory and political considerations, they are themselves raising challenges. This paper focuses on the legal challenges raised by the new era Space 4.0 and outlines the framework conditions for legal certainty in this rapidly changing environment. It elaborates on the content of Space 4.0 and its implementation, the legal framework for space activities, and how this is currently challenged by two characteristics of the Space 4.0 development, commercialisation of space activities, along with increasing cyber-security concerns in the context of digital divide and big data.


Gina Petrovici
Master of Laws (LL.M) University of London.

Antonio Carlo
Sapienza University of Rome.
Article

Accommodating New Commercial Space Applications in the Global Legal/Regulatory Framework

An Evolutionary Approach to Launching the New Space Revolution

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 5 2017
Authors Audrey L. Allison and Bruce Chesley
Author's information

Audrey L. Allison
Audrey L. Allison, Esq., The Boeing Company.

Bruce Chesley
Bruce Chesley, PhD, The Boeing Company.

Stefan A. Kaiser
LLM (McGill). Wassenberg, Germany, stefanakaiser@aol.com. This paper represents the author’s personal opinion and shall not be attributed to any organization with which he is affiliated. Copyright by Stefan A. Kaiser, 2017. Published by American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc., with permission.
Article

Legal Loophole or Just a Matter of Interpretation?

On the Outer Space Treaty’s Methodology Test with the Diversification of Space Activities

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 1 2017
Authors Merve Erdem
Author's information

Merve Erdem
Department of International Law, Ankara University Faculty of Law, Cemal Gürsel Caddesi No: 58, 06590, Cebeci, Ankara, Turkey, erdemm@ankara.edu.tr

Elina Morozova
Head of International & Legal Service, Intersputnik International Organization of Space Communications, morozova@intersputnik.com.

Olusoji Nester John
African Regional Centre for Space Science and Technology Education in English (ARCSSTE-E), Nigeria

Victoria Morenike John-Olorioke
Obafemi Awolowo University, Nigeria

Ololade Olateru- Olagbegi
Adekunle Ajasin University Akungba-Akoko, Nigeria

Olaposi Adedolapo Olaseeni
Obafemi Awolowo University, Nigeria

Simona Spassova
Simona Spassova (main author), Faculty of Law, Economics and Finance, University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg

Andreas Loukakis
Andreas Loukakis (coauthor), Faculty of Law, Economics and Finance, University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg

Brian M. Stanford
Attorney-Advisor, Office of the General Counsel, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, United States

Annette Froehlich
LL.M., MAS, European Space Policy Institute (ESPI)

Yvon Henri
Chief Space Services Department, International Telecommunication Union (ITU), Radiocommunication Bureau Geneva, Switzerland.
Article

Report of the Symposium

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 9 2013
Authors Iris Froukje Regtien and Aurora Viergever
Author's information

Iris Froukje Regtien
LLB, Leiden University.

Aurora Viergever
LLM (adv), Leiden University.

Annette Froehlich
LL.M., MAS, European Space Policy Institute (ESPI), Schwarzenbergplatz 6, annette. froehlich@espi.or.at, A-1030 Vienna, Austria.

Bernard Laurent
Head of Telecom System, Department Astrium SAS bernard.laurent@astrium.eads.net.

Francis Lyall
Emeritus Professor of Public Law, University of Aberdeen, f.lyall@abdn.ac.uk.

Sarah Moens
Lawyer, Belgium, sarahmj.moens@gmail.com

Dr. Bernhard Schmidt-Tedd
German Aerospace Center DLR, Bernhard.Schmidt-Tedd@dlr.de

Dr. Gulnaz Khalimova
PhD, Moscow, Russia, khalimova@list.ru

Dr. Sergey Teselkin
Air Launch Aerospace Cooperation, Russia, teselkin@poletairlines.com

Olusoji Nester John
Space Application Laboratory (South-West), National Space Research and Development Agency,Nigeria, Ile-Ife, Nigeria

Eguaroje Ezekierl
Space Application Laboratory (South-West), National Space Research and Development Agency,Nigeria, Ile-Ife, Nigeria

Dr. S.O. Mohammed
National Space Research and Development Agency, Abuja, Nigeria, Garki, Abuja, Nigeria
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