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Article

The Proposed Public Procurement for Projects to Enhance Industrial Capabilities through Japanese Lessons Learned

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 9 2018
Keywords H-IIA, H3, Ariane 6, COTS, public private partnership, procurement
Authors Mizuki Tani-Hatakenaka
AbstractAuthor's information

    This paper discusses a framework for governmental projects to enhance industrial capabilities through the lessons learned from the Japanese contractual practice of H3 launch vehicle, comparing with the NASA’s Commercial Orbit Transportation Service (COTS). In 1995, the research and development (R&D) of the H-IIA was started by a former body of JAXA, and each manufacturer was responsible for delivery as required. After twelve-times launches, the operation was privatized to Mitsubishi Heavy Industry, Ltd. (MHI). Concerning H3, MHI was selected as a R&D contractor and a launch provider. MHI established the H3 rocket system specification and responsible for delivering the first vehicle to JAXA in 2020, and JAXA is responsible for the total system including its launch base and the H3 flight demonstration. Such a framework gives MHI more creative freedom, but there can be a room for further clarification of the responsibilities. Coincidentally, such a framework between public and private entities is similar to that of the European new flagship launch vehicle, Ariane 6.
    Meanwhile in NASA’s COTS, partners are responsible for all of the development and operation but they are not required to deliver their vehicles to NASA, contrary to H3. It allows clear role allocation and companies’ maximum creativity. A series of contracts of the Commercial Resupply Services (CRS) after COTS is also remarkable to promote private investment, for example, around half of the total R&D cost is borne by private sectors. Also, cost accounting method does not seem to be applied for the price setting.
    The framework like H-2A is still necessary for high-risk R&D conducted by governmental agencies. It will be, however, necessary for projects, which aims at enhancing industrial capabilities through transferring the operations to the private sectors and encouraging innovation, to be taken different measures in relation to selection of prime contractor, delivery and payment in the development phase and to procurement of launch services in the operating phase.


Mizuki Tani-Hatakenaka
Adv. LL.M Student of Air and Space Law, Law School, Leiden University, Steenschuur 25, Leiden, 2311 ES, the Netherlands, tani.mizuki@jaxa.jp.

    Since its inception, space law has been governed by principles and rules established by governments and primarily applicable to government activities. Today we are experiencing policy changes to encourage private sector initiatives to carry out government missions and to expand potential profit-making opportunities. The space treaties allow for nongovernmental activities in space but only under the auspices of a nation. Each nation approaches legal solutions in their own way. These variations in national law may create challenges for all space-faring nations. If there are no international agreements, they may create a more fragmented, unpredictable, and unsustainable environment for all participants, both governments and private companies in outer space.
    The fragmentation of international law is defined by the development of sets of rules pertaining to specific subject areas that may claim autonomy from principles of general international law. Those subject areas reflect the larger global issues that include the environment, energy, resource availability, migration, health, and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. Space law is unique and may be considered one of the fragmented areas of international law. The principles of the now 50-year old treaties have been formally acknowledged by all space-faring nations. New developments may threaten that.
    At issue are many areas of space law including liability, property rights, and environmental harm. Different on-orbit space activities such as satellite servicing, exploiting resources, and removing debris highlight the types of space activities with many similar legal concerns but which may result in different rules in different nations and even for different rules within a nation. New and growing legal tensions among space-faring nations will arise.
    Solutions to this problem are all suboptimal. Neither top-down oversight nor separate bottom-up rules or guidelines will suffice as stable, predictable, and long-lasting regimes that create a favorable legal environment for future public and private space exploration and use.


Henry R. Hertzfeld
Director and Research Professor, Space Policy Institute, George Washington University, Washington, DC; hhertzfeld@law.gwu.edu.
Article

Transferring Rights of Satellite Imagery and Data: Current Contract Practice and New Challenges

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 3 2018
Keywords geospatial, remote sensing, Incoterms, intellectual property
Authors Jordi Sandalinas Baró
AbstractAuthor's information

    The present work refers to the challenge of understanding the emerging contractual paradigm referred to satellite imagery and data online commerce. Issues like the role of consent in new online contract forms will be analyzed. In this regard, the formation of online contracts requires the existence of consent given by the parties to the contract. The formation of contracts known as “click-wrap”, “browse-wrap” and “shrink-wrap” agreements constitute a new paradigm in the tradition of online commerce related to satellite imagery and data. The author highlights other legal challenges encountered during his research and practice such as the Intellectual Property Paradigm regarding Geospatial imagery and data commercial transactions. Moreover, Value Added Data and the Exhaustion of Rights Principle of the rights deserve also some close attention and must be added to the present study.


Jordi Sandalinas Baró
Attorney at Law, Maritime SDI, Drone and Satellite Law, Lecturer and Course Instructor, Universitat Oberta de Catalunya, CEO Image Sea Solutions, Coordinator SpaceLaw.net, email: advocat@sandalinas.com.

Anton de Waal
Anton de Waal Alberts, Parliament of South Africa.

Peter Martinez
Peter Martinez, SpaceLab, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Cape Town.
Article

NewSpace

Putting an End to National Prestige and Accountability?

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 2 2017
Authors Ulrike M. Bohlmann and Moritz Bürger
Author's information

Ulrike M. Bohlmann
Dr. Ulrike M. Bohlmann, European Space Agency, Paris, France.

Moritz Bürger
Moritz Bürger, B.A., Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.
Article

Access_open International Cooperation in China’s Space Undertakings

Melting Down Political Obstacles through Legal Means

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 6 2016
Authors Xiaodan Wu
Author's information

Xiaodan Wu
China Central University of Finance and Economics.

Setsuko Aoki
Keio University, Japan, saoki@ls.keio.ac.jp.

Tatiana Ribeiro Viana
Tatiana Ribeiro Viana (corresponding author), Sapienza – University of Rome, Italy, tativiana@tiscali.it.

Juliana Macedo Scavuzzi dos Santos
Juliana Macedo Scavuzzi dos Santos, Brazilian Association of Air and Space Law (SBDA), Canada, juliana.scavuzzi@mail.mcgill.ca.

Jairo Becerra
Jairo Becerra, School of Law, Universidad Catolica de Colombia, Universidad del Rosario, Colombia, jabecerrao@ucatolica.edu.co, jairoa.becerra@urosario.edu.co.

Juan Ramón Martinez
Juan Ramón Martinez, School of Law, Universidad del Rosario, Colombia, juan.martinez@urosario.edu.co.

Daniela Almario
Daniela Almario, School of Law, Universidad del Rosario, Colombia, almario.daniela@urosario.edu.co.

Alvaro Fabricio dos Santos
Alvaro Fabricio dos Santos, Advocacy General of the Union (AGU), Brazilian Association for Aeronautics and Space Law (SBDA), São José dos Campos, SP, Brazil, alvaro.santos@agu.gov.br.

José Monserrat Filho
José Monserrat Filho, Brazilian Association for Aeronautics and Space Law (SBDA), Brazilian Society for the Advancement of Science (SBPC), Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil, jose.monserrat.filho@gmail.com.

Anja Nakarada Pecujlic
Mag. iur., University of Vienna, Austria

Catherine Doldirina
Joint Research Centre, Italy

Souichirou Kozuka
Gakushuin University, Japan

Fumiko Masuda
Gakushuin University, Japan
Article

Space Governance in Japan

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 5 2013
Authors Yuichiro Nagai, Hideaki Shiroyama and Motoko Uchitomi
Author's information

Yuichiro Nagai
The University of Tokyo, Japan, nagai.yuichiro.01@gmail.com.

Hideaki Shiroyama
The University of Tokyo, Japan.

Motoko Uchitomi
The University of Tokyo, Japan.

Guillermo Javier Duberti
CONICET/UBA and Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Camilo Guzman Gomez
Sergio Arboleda University, Colombia, camilo.guzman @ usa.edu.co.

Simonetta Di Pippo
Italian Space Agency, Italy, simonetta.dipippo@asi.it.

Marc Haese
DLR, German Aerospace Center, Germany, marc.haese@dlr.de. Note: The views and opinions expressed in this paper are the ones of the author himself and do not represent official DLR positions.

Sylvia Ospina JD. LL.M
Coral Gables, Florida

P. Clerc
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