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    Lagrangian Points constitute a stable gravitational point between two or more celestial bodies. Previously used for scientific endeavours, such as the SOHO mission, in the future, Lagrangian Points may also serve to be both commercially and strategically advantageous given the nominal amount of resources required to keep a satellite or similar orbital asset in station-keeping on a Lagrangian Point.
    To that extent, Lagrangian Points may be viewed as having a commercial ‘value ’ because of the competitive advantage afforded to the owner/operator of a spacecraft occupying such a position. This ‘value ’proposition has certain similarities with geostationary orbital positions in Earth orbit.
    Although propertisation of space and celestial bodies is prohibited under the Outer Space Treaty 1967 (UN), orbits within space still remain rivalrous and commercially lucrative (Green, et al. 2018). By operating in a Lagrangian Point, satellites could effectively exclude competing services from also operating within those Lagrangian Points. For example, where one satellite — or a satellite constellation — operates within a Lagrangian Point, another satellite or satellite constellation might be precluded from operating within the same space of that Lagrangian Point, or its proximity.
    This paper builds on previous work regarding the regulation of natural monopolies to mitigate anti-competitive behaviour risks (Green, et al. 2018) and proposes recommendations on how the risk of natural monopolies forming amongst Lagrangian Point missions may be mitigated under a variety of instruments available to both UNOOSA and the ITU.
    In addition to this, this paper considers the military use of Lagrangian Points to mitigate the risk of transforming space into a warfare domain.


Thomas Green
Thomas Green, PhD Student, University of Wollongong.

Patrick Neumann
Patrick Neumann, Chief Scientist, Neumann Space Pty Ltd.

Kent Grey
Kent Grey, Partner, Minter Ellison, 25 Grenfell Street, Adelaide 5000 Australia.

Trevor Sandlin
Trevor Sandlin, Executive Officer, USNS Fall River, United States Merchant Marine.

    The grand project of “Belt and Road” Space Information Corridor proposed by China, which aims to integrate its space-based platforms for comprehensive space applications under the Belt and Road Initiative, resonates with calls and recommendations of the United Nations conferences on the exploration and peaceful uses of outer space for increased international cooperation in space projects to address common challenges. This project is expected to translate the potentials of space technology for socioeconomic development into real benefits for billions of people along the Belt and Road region. The Chinese government has released guidelines in 2016 to identify the general goals and major tasks.
    As we celebrate legacy of the UNISPACE conferences this year, it is beneficial to also focus on the ramifications of large scale space projects for governance of space activities on national, regional and international level. On the one hand, policy and legal aspects are important factors to be taken into account in project planning and implementation. On the other hand, the need to accommodate requirements of space projects could stimulate adjustment or innovation in space policies and regulations. The “B&R” Space Information Corridor offers us a chance to explore such interaction between space project and space governance. Based on analysis of the relevant aspects of legal environment, this paper purports to examine opportunities and challenges confronted with during implementation of the “mega-project” from legal perspectives.


Kang Duan
China Great Wall Industry Corporation.

Olga A. Volynskaya
Russian Foreign Trade Academy, Russian Federation, o.a.volynskaya@gmail.com.
Article

Keeping Up with the Neighbours?

Reviewing National Space Laws to Account for New Technology – The Australian and Canadian Experience

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 4 2017
Authors Steven Freeland and Ram S. Jakhu
Author's information

Steven Freeland
Prof. Steven Freeland, Western Sydney University, Australia, s.freeland@westernsydney.edu.au.

Ram S. Jakhu
Prof. Ram S. Jakhu, McGill University, Canada, ram.jakhu@mcgill.ca.

Carlos Gabriel Argüelles Arredondo
Instituto de Estudios Internacionales, Universidad del Mar, Mexico, Facultad de Economía y Relaciones Internacionales, Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Mexico, Email: carlosarguellesarr@hotmail.com.
Article

Access_open Report of the 58th Colloquium on the Law of Outer Space

Jerusalem, Israel, 2015

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 8 2015
Authors P.J. Blount and Rafael Moro-Aguilar

P.J. Blount

Rafael Moro-Aguilar
Article

Access_open Space Law and the Media

Science Fiction Movies on the Moon

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 3 2015
Authors Rafael Moro-Aguilar

Rafael Moro-Aguilar
Article

Humanitarian Law Implemented

Space Communication in the Service of International Humanitarian Law

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 2 2015
Authors Mahulena Hofmann and Loren François Florey
Author's information

Mahulena Hofmann
University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg

Loren François Florey
University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg
Article

Avoiding Legal Black Holes

International Humanitarian Law Applied to Conflicts in Outer Space

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 2 2015
Authors Cassandra Steer
Author's information

Cassandra Steer
McGill Institute of Air and Space Law, Canada

Yuri Takaya-Umehara
Any views in this article pertain to the first author only. Kobe University, Japan, yuritakaya_japan@hotmail.com.

Seiji Matsuda
IHI Aerospace Co, Ltd., Japan, matsuda-s@iac.ihi.co.jp.

Takayoshi Fuji
Japan Space Systems, Japan, fuji-takayoshi@jspacesystems.or.jp.

Mitsuteru Kaneoka
CSP Japan, Inc., Japan, kaneoka@csp.co.jp.

Nataliia R. Malysheva
Deputy Director, International Space Law Center, Kyiv, Ukraine, nrm52@mail.ru

Olga S. Stelmakh
Senior Legal Adviser, Parliament of Ukraine, Ukraine, os@c-n-l.eu

Xiaodan Wu
Law School, Central University of Finance and Economics, Beijing, China: unimixiaodanwu@gmail.com.

Dr. Paul Stephen Dempsey
Tomlinson Professor of Law, and Director, Institute of Air & Space Law, McGill University, Montreal, Canada, paul.dempsey@mcgill.ca.

Mr. Francois Cahuzac
CNES, France, francois.cahuzac@cnes.fr.

Mr. Stephane Louvel
CNES, France, stephane.louvel@cnes.fr.

Diego Zannoni
University of Padua, Italy, diegodz83@hotmail.it.

Philippe Clerc
Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES)

Prof. dr. Mark. J Sundahl

Marco Ferrazzani
European Space Agency, ESA Legal Counsel and Head of Legal Department, marco.ferrazzani@esa.int

Rafael Harillo Gomez-Pastrana
Lawyer and Space Consultant, STARDUST CONSULTING

Diego Zannoni
University of Padua, Italy
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