Search result: 10 articles

x
The search results will be filtered on:
Journal Hungarian Yearbook of International Law and European Law x
Article

The Elusive Quest for Digital Exhaustion in the US and the EU

The CJEU’s Tom Kabinet Ruling a Milestone or Millstone for Legal Evolution?

Journal Hungarian Yearbook of International Law and European Law, Issue 1 2020
Keywords digital exhaustion, Tom Kabinet, UsedSoft, ReDigi, copyright law
Authors Shubha Ghosh and Péter Mezei
AbstractAuthor's information

    The CJEU published its much-awaited preliminary ruling in Case C-263/18 - Nederlands Uitgeversverbond and Groep Algemene Uitgevers (the Tom Kabinet case) in December 2019. Our paper aims to introduce the Tom Kabinet ruling and discuss its direct and indirect consequences in copyright law. The Tom Kabinet ruling has seriously limited (in fact, outruled) the resale of lawfully acquired e-books. It left various questions unanswered, and thus missed the opportunity to provide for clarity and consistency in digital copyright law. Our analysis addresses how the CJEU deferred from its own logic developed in the UsedSoft decision on the resale of lawfully acquired computer programs, and how the CJEU’s conservative approach ultimately missed the opportunity to reach a compromise ruling. The paper further introduces the US approach that has a strong distinction between selling and making with respect to the research of exhaustion. We aim to trace how this distinction rests on the statutory basis for exhaustion (in copyright) and common law basis (in patent and trademark law) and compare these findings with the CJEU’s recent interpretation of exhaustion. Our focus will be on the Supreme Court’s decisions in Kirstaeng and Bowman and lower court decisions that examine technological solutions to facilitate resale. We examine how the US approach adopts a rigid approach that might inhibit technological development in digital markets, an approach with parallels in the Tom Kabinet ruling. In conclusion, we assess whether there is convergence between the two sides of the Atlantic or whether there is a path of innovative legal development that reconciles the various precedents.


Shubha Ghosh
Shubha Ghosh: Crandall Melvin professor of law, Syracuse University, US.

Péter Mezei
Péter Mezei: associate professor of law, University of Szeged; adjunct professor (dosentti), University of Turku, Finland.
Article

Snapshot of the EU Soft Law Research Landscape

Main Issues and Challenges

Journal Hungarian Yearbook of International Law and European Law, Issue 1 2019
Keywords soft law, normativity, bindingness, directive-like recommendations, hybridity
Authors Petra Lea Láncos
AbstractAuthor's information

    Inspired by research into international soft law norms, the last two decades have seen an intensified investigation of the non-binding measures of the EU. With the proliferation of such norms at EU level, attempts at a taxonomy of EU soft law have been undertaken. The present paper tries to map the current status of EU soft law research, highlighting possible directions for future research.


Petra Lea Láncos
Researcher, Deutsches Forschungsinstitut für öffentliche Verwaltung, Speyer; associate professor, Pázmány Péter Catholic University, Budapest.
Article

Legal Challenges of the Retention of Worker Status as Reflected in Recent Case-Law of the CJEU

Journal Hungarian Yearbook of International Law and European Law, Issue 1 2019
Keywords free movement of workers, EU citizens, right to move and reside freely, retention of EU worker status, equal treatment, welfare benefits
Authors Laura Gyeney
AbstractAuthor's information

    In recent years, a growing number of cases related to the retention of worker status have emerged in CJEU jurisprudence with reference to welfare benefits, requiring a much deeper analysis of the field treated earlier as peripheral. Such an analysis seems especially justified in light of the current political and legal discourse concerning the issue of free movement, focusing on the question of equal treatment in the field of welfare assistance for mobile citizens. The purpose of this study is to present and put into context the relevant case-law of recent years by analyzing the judgments of the CJEU in two cases that are benchmarks in this field: the Tarola and Saint Prix cases. Both cases highlight the key role that economically active status continues to play in integration law. These judgments also shed light on the challenges arising from the difficulties in distinguishing between the economically active and inactive EU citizen statuses. This issue emerged as an increasingly grave problem in the field of law of free movement, posing a serious dilemma for law enforcement.


Laura Gyeney
Associate professor, Pázmány Péter Catholic University, Budapest.
Article

Key Factors of the Development and Renewal of the Social Market Economy in the EU

Journal Hungarian Yearbook of International Law and European Law, Issue 1 2019
Keywords Europe 2020 strategy, social market economy, eco-social market economy, social welfare systems, EU structural funds
Authors István Kőrösi
AbstractAuthor's information

    The purpose of this study is to present the principles, strategy and operation of the social market economy, based on legal, political and economic considerations. The first social market economy, West Germany – followed by Austria, the Netherlands, as well as other countries in Northern and Western Europe –, mustered a positive overall performance from the post-World War II years to the early 1970s. Since then, however, we have been witnessing the erosion, distortion and decline of efficiency of the social market economy. There are four main issues to be addressed: (i) What are the main theoretical and conceptual, ‘eternal’ elements of the social market economy? (ii) What economic policy was built on this theoretical foundation and why did the system work well in Western Europe after World War II? (iii) What factors eroded this system? (iv) Can social market economy be renewed in the second decade of the 21st century and, if it can, what are the preconditions of it? In my analysis, I highlight some key areas: EU policies, Lisbon Agenda and Europe 2020 strategy, growth, financial disequilibria and competitiveness, innovation and employment, the relation of state and market.


István Kőrösi
Associate professor, Pázmány Péter Catholic University, Budapest; senior research fellow, World Economic Institute of ERRC of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

Henriett Rab
Associate professor, University of Debrecen. Supported by the ÚNKP-17-4-III New National Excellence Program of the Ministry of Human Capacities.

Csaba Varga
Professor Emeritus at the Pázmány Péter Catholic University Institute for Legal Philosophy & Research Professor Emeritus at the Institute for Legal Studies of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

Zsuzsanna Csapó
PhD, senior lecturer, National University of Public Service, Faculty of International and European Studies, Department of International Law.

Dinah Shelton
Manatt/Ahn Professor of International Law, George Washington University Law School; former President of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.

Catherine Barnard
Catherine Barnard, MA (Cantab), L.LM. (EUI), Ph.D. (Cantab), is a Professor in European Union and Employment Law at the University of Cambridge and a fellow of Trinity College. She specialises in EU law, employment law and discrimination law. She is co-director of the Centre for European Legal Studies at Cambridge, and the author of EU Employment Law (4th edn) OUP, Oxford, 2012 and The Substantive Law of the EU: The Four Freedoms (4th edn.), OUP, Oxford, 2013.

Balázs Fekete
Lecturer in law, Pázmány Péter Catholic University Faculty of Law and Political Sciences/Research fellow, Centre for Social Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
Showing all 10 results
You can search full text for articles by entering your search term in the search field. If you click the search button the search results will be shown on a fresh page where the search results can be narrowed down by category or year.