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Discussion

Access_open Hybrid Constitutionalism, Fundamental Rights and the State

A Response to Gunther Teubner

Journal Netherlands Journal of Legal Philosophy, Issue 3 2011
Keywords societal constitutionalism, Gunther Teubner, system theory, fundamental rights
Authors Gert Verschraegen
AbstractAuthor's information

    This contribution explores how much state is necessary to make societal constitutionalism work. I first ask why the idea of a global societal constitutionalism ‘beyond the state-and-politics’ might be viewed as a significant and controversial, but nonetheless justified innovation. In the second part I discuss what Teubner calls ‘the inclusionary effects of fundamental rights’. I argue that Teubner underplays the mediating role of the state in guaranteeing inclusion or access, and in a way presupposes well-functioning states in the background. In areas of limited statehood there is a problem of enforcing fundamental rights law. It is an open question whether, and under which conditions, constitutional norms within particular global social spheres can provide enough counter-weight when state constitutional norms are lacking.


Gert Verschraegen
Gert Verschraegen is Assistant Professor of Theoretical Sociology at the University of Antwerp, Belgium.
Article

Access_open Transnational Fundamental Rights: Horizontal Effect?

Journal Netherlands Journal of Legal Philosophy, Issue 3 2011
Keywords fundamental rights, societal constitutionalism, inclusionary and exclusionary effects, anonymous matrix
Authors Gunther Teubner
AbstractAuthor's information

    Violations of human rights by transnational corporations and by other ‘private’ global actors raise problems that signal the limits of the traditional doctrine of ‘horizontal effects’. To overcome them, constitutional law doctrine needs to be complemented by perspectives from legal theory and sociology of law. This allows new answers to the following questions: What is the validity basis of human rights in transnational ‘private’ regimes – extraterritorial effect, colère public or external pressures on autonomous law making in global regimes? Do they result in protective duties of the states or in direct human rights obligations of private transnational actors? What does it mean to generalise state-directed human rights and to respecify them for different social spheres? Are societal human rights limited to ‘negative’ rights or is institutional imagination capable of developing ‘positive’ rights – rights of inclusion and participation in various social fields? Are societal human rights directed exclusively against corporate actors or can they be extended to counteract structural violence of anonymous social processes? Can such broadened perspectives of human rights be re-translated into the practice of public interest litigation?


Gunther Teubner
Gunther Teubner is Professor of Private Law and Legal Sociology and Principal Investigator of the Excellence Cluster ‘The Formation of Normative Orders’ at the Goethe-University, Frankfurt/Main. He is also Professor at the International University College, Torino, Italy.

Dr. Martha Mejía-Kaiser
Co-Chair, Manfred Lachs Space Law Moot Court Committee, IISL

Diane Howard
McGill University, Montreal

Prof. Irmgard Marboe
University of Vienna

Jonathan F. Galloway
Lake Forest College

Philippe Clerc
Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES)

Peter Bursens
Peter Bursens is hoogleraar aan het Departement Politieke Wetenschappen van de Universiteit Antwerpen. Hij is tevens Jean Monnet Chair. Hij doceert over Europese integratie en multilevel politieke systemen en verricht binnen het ACIM (Antwerp Centre for Institutions and Multilevel Politics) onderzoek naar legitimiteit, europeanisering en het roterend Voorzitterschap van de Raad van Ministers van de EU.

Steven Van Hecke
Steven Van Hecke is postdoctoraal onderzoeker van het Fonds voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek, verbonden aan het ACIM (Antwerp Centre for Institutions and Multilevel Politics) van de Universiteit Antwerpen. Zijn onderzoeksinteresses gaan uit naar Europese politiek en meer in het bijzonder Europese politieke partijen, het Europees Parlement en het roterend Voorzitterschap van de Raad van Ministers.
Symposium

België en Europa: wat na het Voorzitterschap?

Journal Res Publica, Issue 3 2011
Authors Steven Van Hecke, Steven Vanackere and Axel Buyse
Author's information

Steven Van Hecke
Steven Van Hecke is postdoctoraal onderzoeker van het Fonds voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek, verbonden aan het ACIM (Antwerp Centre for Institutions and Multilevel Politics) van de Universiteit Antwerpen. Zijn onderzoeksinteresses gaan uit naar Europese politiek en meer in het bijzonder Europese politieke partijen, het Europees Parlement en het roterend Voorzitterschap van de Raad van Ministers.

Steven Vanackere
Steven Vanackere is Vice-Eerste Minister en Minister van Buitenlandse Zaken en Institutionele Hervormingen in de regering-Leterme II. In de regering-Van Rompuy was hij Vice-Eerste Minister en Minister van Ambtenarenzaken, Overheidsbedrijven en Institutionele Hervormingen. Daarvoor was hij Vlaams Minister van Welzijn, Volksgezondheid en Gezin, Vlaams parlementslid en Schepen van de stad Brussel.

Axel Buyse
Axel Buyse is de Algemeen Vertegenwoordiger van de Vlaamse regering binnen de Permanente Vertegenwoordiging van België bij de EU. Voorheen was hij onder meer Vertegenwoordiger van de Vlaamse regering in Den Haag. Gedurende bijna 20 jaar werkte hij als buitenlandredacteur en -journalist voor De Standaard.

Marco Ferrazzani
European Space Agency, ESA Legal Counsel and Head of Legal Department, marco.ferrazzani@esa.int

Frans G. von der Dunk
University of Nebraska, College of Law, Space and Telecommunications Law Program, Fvonderdunk2@unl.edu

Prof. Dr. Lesley Jane Smith
Leuphana University of Luneburg/ Weber-Steinhaus & Smith, Bremen, Germany,, ljsmith@barkhof.uni-bremen.de

Lydia Boureghda
Attorney at Law, lydiaboureghda@hotmail.com
Article

Access_open When regulators mean business

Regulation in the shadow of environmental Armageddon

Journal Netherlands Journal of Legal Philosophy, Issue 1 2011
Keywords ecological catastrophe, regulatory legitimacy, regulatory effectiveness, geo-engineering
Authors Han Somsen
AbstractAuthor's information

    This article considers the question how knowledge of an impending ecological catastrophe is likely to impact on regulatory legitimacy and regulatory effectiveness. If the ultimate aim to safeguard meaningful human life on earth is in acute danger, this is likely to translate into zero tolerance towards non-compliance with environmental rules designed to avert catastrophe. This, in turn, will persuade regulators to employ normative technologies that do not engage with the moral reason of regulatees at all, but leave no option but to comply. In addition, regulators may turn to panoptic surveillance techniques that allow no breaches of rules to remain undetected. Finally, it is argued that if and to the extent that impending ecological catastrophe marks the end of maintaining the status quo as a plausible policy goal, regulators will be more sympathetic towards potentially apocalyptic technologies that carry greater promise for future gain than otherwise would be the case.


Han Somsen
Han Somsen is Professor of Regulation & Technology at the Tilburg Institute for Law, Technology and Society, and Dean of Research of Tilburg Law School.
Article

Access_open Burgerlijk procesrecht en ideologie

Journal Netherlands Journal of Legal Philosophy, Issue 1 2011
Keywords civil procedure, ideology, principles of procedural law
Authors Remme Verkerk
AbstractAuthor's information

    This contribution offers a partial explanation of the differences between procedural systems. In most jurisdictions, civil procedural regulations constitute a carefully designed system. Generally, a number of underlying principles, guidelines, theories and objectives can be identified that clarify and justify more specific rules of procedure. It will be argued that the main differences between legal systems flow from different political and theoretical views of those who determine and shape the form of the legal process. This contribution identifies the ideological influences on the rules of procedure in a number of influential jurisdictions.


Remme Verkerk
Remme Verkerk was Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Law of Maastricht University. Presently he practices law at Houthoff Buruma.

Daniel D. Bradlow
SARCHI Professor of International Development Law and African Economic Relations, University of Pretoria; Professor of Law, American University Washington College of Law; and Chair, Roster of Experts, Independent Review Mechanism, African Development Bank. The views expressed in this article are his personal views, and should not be attributed to any organisation with which he is affiliated.

Megan S. Chapman
Independent Consultant; B.A. University of Chicago; J.D. American University Washington College of Law. The authors wish to thank Anoush Begoyan, Andria Naude Fourie, Werner Kiene, Ellen Hey, David Hunter, Henrik Linders, Per Eldar Sovik, and our anonymous reviewers for comments on various sections and drafts.

Jonas Ebbesson
Professor of environmental law at Stockholm University, and Chairperson of the Aarhus Convention Compliance Committee. The views in this article are those of the author personally and are not intended to represent those of the Aarhus Convention Compliance Committee.

Jeroen Temperman
Assistant Professor of Public International Law, Erasmus University Rotterdam; Erasmus Fellow; and Editor-in-Chief of Religion & Human Rights: An International Journal.
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