Search result: 9 articles

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Year 2012 x
Article

Gender Equality Laws in the Post Socialist States of Central and Eastern Europe

Mainstream Fixture or Fizzer?

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 4 2012
Keywords gender equality laws, enforcement mechanisms, rule of law, post-socialist states, European Union
Authors Christine Forster and Vedna Jivan
AbstractAuthor's information

    In Central and Eastern European countries, the enactment of gender equality laws (GELs), defined as stand-alone national legislation that provide an overarching legislative response to gender discrimination as distinct from the traditional approach of incorporating gender equality provisions into existing legislation or constitutions, has been a marked regional trend since the collapse of the Soviet Union. However, rather than being driven by domestic movements for change, GELs seem primarily to have emerged due to pressure from development agencies, potential trading partners and donor organisations which predicate their assistance and business on the establishment of the ‘rule of law’ and of particular relevance in the region the desire to join the European Union (EU), which requires potential members to introduce gender equality legislation as part of the communtaire aquis. Despite the widespread enactment of GELs in the region, research suggests that the implementation of GELs has been slow, inefficient and in some cases non-existent. Reasons posited for this include a lack of judicial familiarity with new concepts contained in the legislation, the use of legislation taken from models in existing member states, lack of information disseminated about the new laws to relevant parties, weak political support and capacity weakness in states that are resource stretched. This article considers a further reason – the weakness of the enforcement and implementation mechanisms in the laws themselves and argues that despite the placement of expansive positive duties on a range of public and private actors in many of the GELs, the implementation and enforcement mechanisms of the fifteen GELs considered are weak. Consequently, despite their remarkable scope the duties created under the GELs are largely symbolic and will continue to be so unless, such legislation is amended to include mechanisms to enable the realization of those duties in practice.


Christine Forster
Christine Forster is a senior lecturer at the Faculty of Law of the University of New South Wales, Australia.

Vedna Jivan
Vedna Jivan is Senior Lecturer, UTS Faculty of Law, Australia.

Susan Myres JD
Susan Myres is the principal at Myres and Associates, PLLC located in Houston, Texas; www.myresfamilylaw.com, smyres@myresfamilylaw.com. She is a member of the Board of Managers of the International Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, USA Chapter. She is secretary of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers.

Christopher Flynn MD
Menninger Clinic, Houston, TX, USA, cflynn@menninger.edu.

    In dit artikel wordt aandacht besteed aan duo-moederschap in Nederland vanuit een ontwikkelingspsychologisch/pedagogisch en een juridisch perspectief. Allereerst wordt aandacht besteed aan de huidige juridische situatie en de ontwikkelingen die zich recent daarin hebben voorgedaan. Uit deze bespreking rijst een aantal vragen met betrekking tot de relatie tussen de duo-moeders, het kind en de (on)bekende donor, die vervolgens vanuit ontwikkelingspsychologisch perspectief worden besproken. In het laatste deel van het artikel wordt aandacht besteed aan de voorgestelde wetgeving met betrekking tot de positie van het kind in een gezin met twee moeders, waarbij aan de hand van de ontwikkelingspsychologische bevindingen wordt gekeken naar de kwaliteit van het voorstel.
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    This article focuses upon dual motherhood in the Netherlands from a psychological development/educational and legal perspective. Firstly, attention is paid to the current legal situation and the developments which have recently occurred in this regard. From this, a number of questions arise concerning the relationship between dual mothers, the child and the (un)known donor, which will be discussed from a psychological development perspective. The last part of the article focuses upon the proposed legislation with regard to position of the child in a family with two mothers, examining the quality of the proposal on the basis of the findings concerning psychological development.


Machteld Vonk
Machteld Vonk studied law between 1998 and 2002 at the University of Amsterdam. Following this, she began her PhD at the Molengraaff Institute for Private Law of Utrecht University, under the supervision of Prof. K. Boele-Woelki. Her research looked at the legal relationship between children and non-biological parents from a comparative perspective. In December 2007, she defended her PhD dissertation ‘Children and their parents’ (Intersentia; 2007). From January 2008 until July 2012, she was employed at the Molengraaff Institute as a lecturer/researcher on family law and comparative law. Since 1st July 2012, she has worked in the department of child law of Leiden University as a lecturer/researcher on child law.

Dr. Henny Bos
Henny Bos works as a lecturer at the University of Amsterdam (the department of child development and education and teacher training). Her research concerns gay and lesbian parenthood. She has established a Dutch longitudinal study on this research area, and also participates in an American longitudinal study concerning this subject. From February until the end of June 2012, she was a visiting scholar at the Williams Institute (University of California in Los Angeles).
Article

Why the Inflation in Legislation on Women’s Bodies?

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 2-3 2012
Keywords legislation and control of women’s bodies, legislative drafting and the female autonomy, social and political theories and control of women’s bodies
Authors Venessa McLean
AbstractAuthor's information

    This article seeks to explore how historical patriarchal theories have crept into the world’s legal systems to date and has led to inflation in legislation upon women’s bodies. The article highlights how legislation has been used as a tool to deny women autonomy over their bodies by placing unnecessary controls upon women’s bodies by legislative, social and political systems and concludes by an examination of the discipline legislative drafting and how an active approach through drafting activism on the part of legislative drafters and policy makers may combat the inflation in legislation upon women’s bodies.


Venessa McLean
The author currently works at The Office of the Chief Parliamentary Counsel in Jamaica as a Legislative Officer. She is also Visiting Lecturer on the Special Narcotic Investigation Course Carribbean Regional Drug Law Enforcement Centre, Jamaica and Visiting Lecturer University of London External Degree Programme.
Article

Immigration, Religion and Human Rights

State Policy Challenges in Balancing Public and Private Interests

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 1 2012
Keywords globalization, religious symbols, reasonable accommodations, comparative law, immigration, burqa, human rights
Authors Eric Tardif
AbstractAuthor's information

    Three regions of the world – Western Europe, North America, and Australia – are probably the most popular options when families of emerging countries decide to emigrate in order to better their economic future. As the flow of immigrants establishing themselves in the receiving societies allows for these countries to get culturally richer, it creates, on the other hand, legal tensions as to the extent religious practice is to be accommodated by the governments of secular societies so as to facilitate the insertion of the newcomers into the workplace, social networks, and education system. In order to eliminate or diminish the effect of legal provisions that cause an indirect harm to religious minorities, several countries have taken steps aimed at “reasonably accommodating” them. This paper looks at these efforts made by receiving States, taking into account both the legislative aspect and the interpretation of the statutes and constitutional provisions by national as well as international tribunals; it also gives a critical appreciation of the results that have been obtained in the societies that have implemented those shifts in their legal system.


Eric Tardif
LL.L. (Ottawa); LL.M., LL.D. (National Autonomous University of Mexico - UNAM). The author is currently a Lecturer at the Faculty of Law of the National Autonomous University of Mexico, in the subjects of International and Comparative Law. This document was initially prepared for presentation at the VIIIth World Congress of the International Association of Constitutional Law, held in Mexico City, 6-10 December, 2010; an earlier version of this article was published in the International Journal of Public Law and Policy in 2011.
Article

Access_open Public and Private Regulation

Mapping the Labyrinth

Journal The Dovenschmidt Quarterly, Issue 1 2012
Keywords private regulation, regulatory impact assessment, standard-setting, voluntary certification, sustainabbility reporting, effectiveness indicators, governance indicators
Authors Fabrizio Cafaggi and Andrea Renda
AbstractAuthor's information

    Private governance is currently being evoked as a viable solution to many public policy goals. However, in some circumstances it has shown to produce more harm than good, and even disastrous consequences like in the case of the financial crisis that is raging in most advanced economies. Although the current track record of private regulatory schemes is mixed, policy guidance documents around the world still require that policymakers award priority to self- and co-regulation, with little or no additional guidance being given to policymakers to devise when, and under what circumstances, these solutions can prove viable from a public policy perspective. With an array of examples from several policy fields, this paper approaches regulation as a public-private collaborative form and attempts to identify possible policy tools to be applied by public policymakers to efficiently and effectively approach private governance as a solution, rather than a problem. We propose a six-step theoretical framework and argue that IA techniques should: (i) define an integrated framework including both the possibility that private regulation can be used as an alternative or as a complement to public legislation; (ii) Involve private parties in public IAs in order to define the best strategy or strategies that would ensure achievement of the regulatory objectives; and (iii) Contemplate the deployment of indicators related to governance and activities of the regulators and their ability to coordinate and solve disputes with other regulators.


Fabrizio Cafaggi
European University Institute, Fiesole Università di Trento (F. Cafaggi).

Andrea Renda
LUISS Guido Carli, Rome; Centre for European Policy Studies, Brussels; European University Institute, Fiesole (A. Renda).

Kristin Henrard
Professor of Minority Protection at the Erasmus University Rotterdam.
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