Search result: 38 articles

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Year 2015 x
Article

Sir William Dale Annual Memorial Lecture

Is Legislation Literature?

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 3 2015
Authors Sir Geoffrey Bowman
Author's information

Sir Geoffrey Bowman
Sir Geoffrey was the First Parliamentary Counsel 2002-2006. He is a Bencher of Lincoln’s Inn, has an honorary LLD degree of the University of London, and is a Senior Associate Fellow of the IALS.

    Over the last decade, Nigeria has witnessed several high-intensity conflicts. It became a country under preliminary investigation by the International Criminal Court (ICC) following allegations of serious crimes. In 2013, the boko haram insurgency was classified as a “non-international armed conflict.” Commentators appear divided over the capacity and willingness of domestic institutions to manage crimes arising from or connected with conflicts in Nigeria. Those who argue for unwillingness often point to the struggle to domesticate the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (Rome Statute) as one of the clearest indication that there is not sufficient interest. This article interrogates the question of seeming impunity for serious crimes in Nigeria and makes a case for domesticating the Rome Statute through an amendment to the Crimes against Humanity, War Crimes, Genocide and Related Offences Bill, 2012 pending before the National Assembly.


Stanley Ibe
LL.B. (Lagos State University, Nigeria); LL.M. (Maastricht University, The Netherlands); Postgraduate Diploma in International Protection of Human Rights (Abo Akademi, Finland). Ibe is an associate legal officer for Africa at the Open Society Justice Initiative. He writes in a private capacity.
Article

Access_open Cutting Corners or Enhancing Efficiency?

Simplified Procedures and the Israeli Quest to Speed up Justice

Journal Erasmus Law Review, Issue 4 2015
Keywords Israel, austerity, civil procedure, simplified procedures, small claims
Authors Ehud Brosh
AbstractAuthor's information

    Israel was spared the worst of the world financial crisis of 2008-2009. However, austerity concerns are by no means invisible in the developments in the field of civil procedure. These concerns correlate heavily with the long-standing Israeli preoccupation with ‘speeding up’ justice. An array of simplified procedural tracks, aimed at addressing the perceived inadequacy of ‘standard’ procedure, have been developed in Israel over the years. The importance of simplified procedures in the Israeli system cannot be overestimated. Their development illustrates the dialectical tension between the values of ‘efficiency’ and ‘quality’ in the administration of justice. During periods of austerity, the scales are easily (or easier) tipped in favour of efficiency and general or particular simplification of procedure. In times of prosperity, on the other hand, concerns over ‘quality’, access to justice, and truth discovery predominate, and attempts at promoting efficiency and/or simplification at their expense tend to be bogged down. Such attempts also tend to lose their extrinsic legitimacy and are widely viewed as ‘cutting corners’. This is evident in the recent Israeli experience with civil procedure reform.


Ehud Brosh
Ehud Brosh, LL.M., is a research student at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
Article

Access_open The Norm of Integrity in Corporate Governance Codes: Could It Be Made Enforceable?

Journal The Dovenschmidt Quarterly, Issue 2 2015
Keywords corporate governance, integrity, legal strategies, Goldman Sachs
Authors B.T.M. Steins Bisschop
AbstractAuthor's information

    The faring of Goldman Sachs during the financial crisis of 2008 is discussed against the background of legal instruments that were employed to avoid its failure. This discussion leads to the conclusion that in this case, the limits of classical legal instruments were reached. To further good corporate governance, the legal relevance of the term ‘integrity’ is explored. It is concluded that the legal term of integrity is used universally in corporate governance codes, but is not operational and therefore not enforceable. An attempt is made to redefine this general principle into a more operational term. This is tested in the case of Goldman Sachs’ executive Jon Winkelried. It is assumed that he has violated the standard of integrity but also that there were no enforceable legal means to sanction his behaviour. The conclusion is that the more operational interpretation of the term integrity could, in this case, have resulted in an enforceable legal instrument to sanction behaviour that is contrary to the norm of integrity. This operational term of integrity could aid in the debate on furthering good corporate governance through enforceable legal strategies.


B.T.M. Steins Bisschop
Prof. Dr. Bas T.M. Steins Bisschop holds a chair Corporate Law and Governance at the Faculty of Law of Maastricht University and a chair Corporate Law at Nyenrode Business University. He is partner of a boutique law firm in The Hague, The Netherlands.
Article

Access_open The 2015 Proposal for an EU Directive on the Societas Unius Personae (SUP)

Another Attempt to Square the Circle?

Journal The Dovenschmidt Quarterly, Issue 2 2015
Keywords EU law harmonisation, single member private companies, Proposed SUP Directive, European ‘trade mark’
Authors Stephan Rammeloo
AbstractAuthor's information

    Stimulating business throughout the Single Market, not in the least for Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs), is one of the key priorities of the EU’s ten-year growth strategy, ‘Europe 2020’. One of the strategies to achieve this goal is the recently developed legal concept of a ‘European trademark’ for single member private limited liability companies duly established under the laws of any EU Member State and complying with preconditions required by a draft Proposal for a Directive on the Societas Unius Personae (SUP). The 2015 Compromising text, having replaced the initial 2014 Draft for a Directive requires to be analysed in view of its ‘scope’ (functional and geographical reach). Furthermore, attention is given to matters of formation and ‘long distance’ registration, share capital, internal organization and functioning of company organs, the functioning of SUP’s as stand alone companies or SUP’s embedded in company group or chain structures. Critical observations inter alia focus on relinquished provisions on the SUP’s seat as well as the powers of SUP organs and on ‘national law’ creeping in the Proposed Directive more and more at the cost of legal certainty and legal coherence between EU law instruments relevant to private limited liability companies.


Stephan Rammeloo
Associate Professor EU Company Law, Private International Law and Comparative Law, Maastricht University.

Aniko Raisz
Associate professor, International Law Department, Faculty of Law and Political Sciences, University of Miskolc.

Eszter Lilla Seres
Student, Faculty of Law and Political Sciences, University of Miskolc.
Article

Report of the Symposium

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 11 2015
Authors Carol A. Anderson and Mclee Kerolle
Author's information

Carol A. Anderson
At the Symposium, the Rapporteurs were both candidates for the Advanced LLM in Air and Space Law offered by Leiden University’s International Institute of Air and Space Law (IIASL).

Mclee Kerolle
At the Symposium, the Rapporteurs were both candidates for the Advanced LLM in Air and Space Law offered by Leiden University’s International Institute of Air and Space Law (IIASL).

Kumar Abhijeet
Assistant Professor of Law, National Law School of India University, Bangalore. Doctoral Candidate Institute of Air and Space Law, University of Cologne, Germany.

Paul B. Larsen
The author taught air and space law for more than 40 years respectively at Southen Methodist University and at Georgetown University. He is co-author of Larsen, Sweeney and Gilick, Aviation Law, Cases, Laws and Related Sources, second edition (Martinus Nijhof, 2012) and of Lyall and Larsen, Space Law A Treatise (Ashgate 2009)

Sadaf Amrin Fathima
Student of Master’s in Space and Telecommunication Law, Center of Air and Space Law (CASL), NALSAR University of Law, India.
Article

Access_open Report of the 58th Colloquium on the Law of Outer Space

Jerusalem, Israel, 2015

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 8 2015
Authors P.J. Blount and Rafael Moro-Aguilar

P.J. Blount

Rafael Moro-Aguilar
Article

Mining Outer Space

Overcoming Legal Barriers to a Well-Promising Future

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 7 2015
Authors Maria Manoli
Author's information

Maria Manoli
McGill University, Institute of Air and Space Law, Montreal, Canada
Article

Internet from the Sky

Legal Challenges

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 7 2015
Authors Dimitrios Stratigentas and Mclee Kerolle
Author's information

Dimitrios Stratigentas
Dimitrios Stratigentas, International Institute of Air and Space Law, Leiden University,Greece

Mclee Kerolle
International Institute of Air and Space Law, Leiden University, United States
Article

Policy Considerations for New Human Space Exploration Strategies

The Space Generation Perspective

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 7 2015
Authors Chantelle Dubois, Lazlo Bacsardi, Ali Nasseri e.a.
Author's information

Chantelle Dubois
Space Generation Advisory Council, Canada

Lazlo Bacsardi
Hungary

Ali Nasseri
Canada

Michael Deiml
Germany

Alana Bartolini
Canada

Kate Howells
Canada

Jessica Todd
Australia

Kumar Abhijeet
Australia
Article

Legal Motherhood and Parental Responsibility

A Comparative Study on the Tensions between Scientific Knowledge, Social Reality and Personal Identity

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 2 2015
Keywords motherhood, child’s right to identity, baby-box, secret birth, confidential birth
Authors Prof. dr. Christine Budzikiewicz and Dr. Machteld Vonk
AbstractAuthor's information

    For the past 15 to 20 years there has been intense discussion in many European countries how mothers in a crisis situation can be prevented from abandoning or even killing their new born babies. Baby-boxes have been installed in a number of countries and/or possibilities for anonymous birth have been discussed or introduced. The Committee on the Rights of the Child expressed concern over these developments and stated that both developments infringe on the child’s right to know its origins. Both Germany and the Netherlands have taken steps to protect new mothers and their babies in crisis situations by introducing a form of secrecy surrounding the mother’s identity. In Germany this has taken the form of a recently introduced law that keeps the birth and the identity of the mother confidential, in the Netherlands this has taken the form of a protocol drawn up by professionals which aims to keep the birth and the mother’s identity secret. This article will compare and critically discuss these developments in Germany and the Netherlands.


Prof. dr. Christine Budzikiewicz
Prof. dr. Christine Budzikiewicz is professor of law at the Institute of Comparative Law of Marburg University in Germany, <www.uni-marburg.de/fb01/lehrstuehle/zivilrecht/budzikiewicz>.

Dr. Machteld Vonk
Dr. Machteld Vonk is assistant professor of child and family law at the Child Law Department of Leiden University Law School in The Netherlands, <http://law.leiden.edu/organisation/private-law/child-law/staff/mjvonk.html>.
Article

Access_open The Casuistry of International Criminal Law: Exploring A New Field of Research

Journal Netherlands Journal of Legal Philosophy, Issue 2 2015
Keywords international criminal law, judicial reasoning, casuistry, genocide
Authors Marjolein Cupido
AbstractAuthor's information

    International criminal courts have made an important contribution to the development of international criminal law. Through case law, the courts have fine-tuned and modernized outdated concepts of international crimes and liability theories. In studying this practice, scholars have so far focused on the judicial interpretation of statutory and customary rules, thereby paying little attention to the rules’ application in individual cases. In this article, I reveal the limitations of this approach and illustrate how insights from casuistry can advance international criminal law discourse. In particular, I use the example of genocide to show that casuistic case law analyses can help scholars clarify the meaning of the law and appraise the application of substantive legal concepts in individual cases. Based on these observations, I argue that scholars should complement their current research with studies into the casuistry of international criminal law.


Marjolein Cupido
Marjolein Cupido is Assistant Professor at the Department of Criminal Law at VU University Amsterdam and fellow of the Center for International Criminal Justice.

Kumar Abhijeet
Doctoral Candidate, Institute of Air and Space Law, University of Cologne, Germany
Article

How Simple Terms Mislead Us

The Pitfalls of Thinking about Outer Space as a Commons

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 5 2015
Authors Henry R. Hertzfeld, Brian Weeden and Christopher D. Johnson
Author's information

Henry R. Hertzfeld
Research Professor, Space Policy Institute, George Washington University, Washington, DC

Brian Weeden
Technical Advisor, Secure World Foundation, Washington, DC

Christopher D. Johnson
Project Manager, Secure World Foundation, Washington, DC
Article

Small But on the Radar

The Regulatory Evolution of Small Satellites in the Netherlands

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 5 2015
Authors Neta Palkovitz and Tanja Masson-Zwaan
Author's information

Neta Palkovitz
PhD candidate, International Institute of Air and Space Law, Leiden University, The Netherlands, ISIS – Innovative Solutions In Space B.V., The Netherlands

Tanja Masson-Zwaan
International Institute of Air and Space Law, Leiden University, The Netherlands

Shouping Li
Professor of international law, Law school of Beijing Institute of Technology, Director of Institute of Space Law of Beijing Institute of Technology
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