Search result: 16 articles

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Year 2010 x
Article

Access_open Constitutionalism and the Incompleteness of Democracy: An Iterative Relationship

Journal Netherlands Journal of Legal Philosophy, Issue 3 2010
Keywords constitutionalism, globalization, democracy, modernity, postnational
Authors Neil Walker
AbstractAuthor's information

    The complexity of the relationship between democracy and modern constitutionalism is revealed by treating democracy as an incomplete ideal. This refers both to the empirical incompleteness of democracy as unable to supply its own terms of application – the internal dimension – and to the normative incompleteness of democracy as guide to good government – the external dimension. Constitutionalism is a necessary response to democratic incompleteness – seeking to realize (the internal dimension) and to supplement and qualify democracy (the external dimension). How democratic incompleteness manifests itself, and how constitutionalism responds to incompleteness evolves and alters, revealing the relationship between constitutionalism and democracy as iterative. The paper concentrates on the iteration emerging from the current globalizing wave. The fact that states are no longer the exclusive sites of democratic authority compounds democratic incompleteness and complicates how constitutionalism responds. Nevertheless, the key role of constitutionalism in addressing the double incompleteness of democracy persists under globalization. This continuity reflects how the deep moral order of political modernity, in particular the emphasis on individualism, equality, collective agency and progress, remains constant while its institutional architecture, including the forms of its commitment to democracy, evolves. Constitutionalism, itself both a basic orientation and a set of design principles for that architecture, remains a necessary support for and supplement to democracy. Yet post-national constitutionalism, even more than its state-centred predecessor, remains contingent upon non-democratic considerations, so reinforcing constitutionalism’s normative and sociological vulnerability. This conclusion challenges two opposing understandings of the constitutionalism of the global age – that which indicts global constitutionalism because of its weakened democratic credentials and that which assumes that these weakened democratic credentials pose no problem for post-national constitutionalism, which may instead thrive through a heightened emphasis on non-democratic values.


Neil Walker
Neil Walker is Regius Professor of Public Law and the Law of Nature and Nations at the University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom.

P. Clerc

S. Freeland

S.A. Kaiser


Dr. Shawn Boyne
Associate Professor of Law, Indiana University School of Law, Indianapolis
Practice

When the Package Holiday is Not Realized

A Piece of EU Consumer Law under Review

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 3-4 2010
Keywords package holiday, consumer law, contract law
Authors Dr. Josep M. Bech Serrat
AbstractAuthor's information

    When a package travel contract is not realized, the organizer assumes the obligation to inform the consumer, to provide a refund and to provide alternative services. All these measures form part of the core of the EU’s legislative acquis and are mainly governed by Directive 90/314/EEC of 13 June 1990 on package travel, package holidays and package tours. The Directive employs a fragmented approach and is currently under review. This area also remains outside the new comprehensive approach introduced by the Proposal for a Directive of the European Parliament and the Council of 8 October 2008 on consumer rights, and it would appear that this harmonization ‘deficit’ will be covered by means of ‘vertical action’. The aims of this paper are to contrast the existing regulations in this field with the general rules of consumer contract law, to identify the inconsistencies involved and to present some proposals regarding performance rules.


Dr. Josep M. Bech Serrat
Dr. Josep M. Bech Serrat is Lecturer in Civil Law at Tourism School, University of Girona.
Article

The Right to Food

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 3-4 2010
Keywords food crisis, right to food
Authors Ying Chen
AbstractAuthor's information

    With the development of society, new agricultural technologies have been widely introduced and effectively applied to agricultural cultivation. Agricultural productive capacity has greatly improved and the world’s food producers are capable of providing all the people on this planet with sufficient food to satisfy everyday dietary needs for a healthy life. Ironically, food insecurity continues to be a critical issue in the contemporary world. More than 923 million people suffer from chronic hunger, malnutrition or related diseases, and this number grows with continually rising food prices. This article responds to the current food insecurity by addressing a new issue: is there any legal basis for both the international community and national governments to protect vulnerable people from hunger and malnutrition?


Ying Chen
S.J.D. Candidate, LL.M., Indiana University School of Law Indianapolis.
Article

Good Governance

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 1-2 2010
Keywords international cooperation, state administration, substate-level administration, steering non-governmental bodies, principles of Human-Rights-and-Rule-of-Law, democracy structures, procedures and manpower of administration
Authors Prof. Dr. Ulrich Karpen
AbstractAuthor's information

    “Good Governance” is a term used worldwide to measure, analyse and compare, mainly quantitatively and qualitatively, but not exclusively, public governments, for the purpose of qualifying them for international developmental aid, for improving government and administration domestically, etc.
    In Section A the use of the key term is explained more thoroughly; Section B lists goals and effects of governance from the international, supranational (European) and national perspective; Section C contains guidelines for governance as vested in constitution and law and Section D describes the main instruments and tools to work on better governance.


Prof. Dr. Ulrich Karpen
Prof. Dr. Ulrich Karpen, Faculty of Law, University of Hamburg.
Article

Establishing Protection Mechanisms for Bureaucrats

The Case of the Independent Oversight Board of Civil Service of Kosovo

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 1-2 2010
Keywords Kosovo Civil Service, Civil service, Oversight Board, law, reform
Authors Dren Doli, Fisnik Korenica and Artan Rogova
AbstractAuthor's information

    This article discusses the position and powers of Kosovo’s Civil Service Oversight Board, mainly from a legal perspective. The article describes the reforms undertaken upon the Board and the civil service in Kosovo, while illustrating the central pillars of concern in regard to both the international presence and domestic institutions in Kosovo. The article then explains the three reforms and reviews each of the main legal changes the Board and the civil system have experienced, respectively. The last section of the article comprises an institutional review of the powers and the position of the current framework on the Civil Service Oversight Board, while allowing a part of the article to question its independence and pluralism. The article culminates with policy suggestions that would make the work of the Board, and the entire civil service, more independent and accountable to its mission.


Dren Doli
Dren Doli is a Senior Research Fellow at the Group for Legal and Political Studies, and a Senior Lecturer on Law Principles at Universum University College, having served earlier as a Senior Legal Executive for Integration to the Kosovo Prime Minister.

Fisnik Korenica
Fisnik Korenica is a Lecturer on the Theory of State and Law at the University of Prishtina, and a Senior Research Fellow at the Group for Legal and Political Studies.

Artan Rogova
Artan Rogova is a Senior Research Fellow at the Group for Legal and Political Studies, as a Lecturer on Economics of European Integration at Universum University College.
Article

Act of Parliament: The Role of Parliament in the Legislative Process

A Commonwealth Perspective

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 1-2 2010
Keywords parliament, legislation, pre-legislative scrutiny, supremacy of parliament, delegated legislation, Uganda, legislative process
Authors Denis Kibirige Kawooya
AbstractAuthor's information

    Whereas making law is one of the principal functions of Parliament, Parliament plays a very limited role in the legislative process. In Uganda, like in many commonwealth jurisdictions due to the role the Constitution has given to Parliament, the legislature should take a more active role in the legislative process. The paper examines the legislative authority of Parliament, the concept of Parliamentary supremacy, pre-legislative scrutiny and whether Parliament should be involved in the scrutiny of delegated legislation.


Denis Kibirige Kawooya
Denis Kibirige Kawooya is a Senior State Attorney in the Ministry of Justice and Constitutional Affairs, Uganda, a member of the Commonwealth Association of Legislative Counsel, Uganda Law Society, East African Law Society and an Advocate of the High Court of Uganda.
Article

Legislative Drafting Tools for Stabilization Provisions and Economic Balancing Provisions

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 1-2 2010
Keywords legislative drafting, stabilization, economic balancing provisions
Authors Linnet Mafukidze
AbstractAuthor's information

    The article outlines the problems with stabilization provisions in national oil or gas legislation with regard to the difficulty of governments to implement legislation to develop its economic, social and environmental regimes. It also seeks to provide a potential guideline for legislative drafters in order to address the problems wrought by stabilization provisions, in national oil or gas legislation, through the use of economic balancing provisions. The article further gives tools for legislative drafters to use when drafting economic balancing provisions.


Linnet Mafukidze
Linnet Mafukidze is a Senior State Counsel at the Attorney General’s Chambers, Botswana.
Article

You Can Lead an Astronaut to Water...: Prospects for Legal Use and Water Rights on the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies

Nandasiri Jasentuliyana Keynote Lecture on Space Law & 2nd Young Scholars Session

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 1 2010
Authors J. Easterson

J. Easterson

Ann-Sophie Vandenberghe
Ann-Sophie Vandenberghe is Assistant Professor of Law and Economics, Rotterdam Institute of Law and Economics, Erasmus School of Law.

Gerhard Wagner
Dr. Gerhard Wagner LL.M. is Professor of Fundamentals of Private Law at Erasmus University, Rotterdam, as well as, Professor of German and European Private Law and Civil Procedure at the University of Bonn.

Lilla Farkas
Lilla Farkas is a member of the Budapest Bar Association, holds an LLM from King's College, London and is a PhD candidate at Lóránd Eötvös University's Faculty of Law in Budapest, Hungary. She is collaborating with the Budapest-based Chance for Children Foundation and the Brussels-based Migration Policy Group. She serves as president of the Hungarian Equal Treatment Authority's Advisory Board and as a race (Roma) ground coordinator for the European Network of Independent Experts in the Non-Discrimination Field.

Tetty Havinga
Dr. ir. Tetty Havinga, Associate Professor of Sociology of Law, Institute for the Sociology of Law, Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands. E-mail: <T.Havinga@jur.ru.nl>.
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