Search result: 28 articles

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Year 2012 x
Article

Structuring the Judiciary to Conduct Constitutional Review in the Netherlands

A Comparative and European Perspective

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 4 2012
Keywords centralized/decentralized constitutional review, Netherlands constitutional law, comparative law
Authors Gerhard van der Schyff
AbstractAuthor's information

    Whether a legal system decides to centralize or decentralize constitutional review by the judiciary is dependent on various factors. This article critically considers a host of these factors, ranging from the separation of powers to the desire to bring about far-reaching constitutional change and the possible impact of membership of the European Union, in studying whether in the Netherlands constitutional review should be centralized or decentralized upon its possible introduction. The conclusion is reached that although decentralization can be opted for under the current circumstances, a persuasive case for centralization can also be made and might even become stronger and inevitable depending on the course of future constitutional reform.


Gerhard van der Schyff
Gerhard van der Schyff is Senior Lecturer in Constitutional Law at Tilburg Law School, The Netherlands.

Jacqueline Gray
PhD candidate, UCERF, Utrecht Universiteit.
Article

Access_open ‘Down Freedom’s Main Line’

Journal Netherlands Journal of Legal Philosophy, Issue 3 2012
Keywords democracy, radical freedom, free market economy, consumerism, collective action
Authors Steven L. Winter
AbstractAuthor's information

    Two waves of democratization define the post-Cold War era of globalization. The first one saw democracies emerge in post-communist countries and post-Apartheid South Africa. The current wave began with the uprisings in the Middle East. The first focused on the formal institutions of the market and the liberal state, the second is participatory and rooted in collective action. The individualistic conception of freedom and democracy that underlies the first wave is false and fetishistic. The second wave shows democracy’s moral appeal is the commitment to equal participation in determining the terms and conditions of social life. Freedom, thus, requires collective action under conditions of equality, mutual recognition, and respect.


Steven L. Winter
Steven L. Winter is Walter S. Gibbs Professor of Constitutional Law at Wayne State University Law School, Detroit, Michigan.

    In dit artikel wordt aandacht besteed aan duo-moederschap in Nederland vanuit een ontwikkelingspsychologisch/pedagogisch en een juridisch perspectief. Allereerst wordt aandacht besteed aan de huidige juridische situatie en de ontwikkelingen die zich recent daarin hebben voorgedaan. Uit deze bespreking rijst een aantal vragen met betrekking tot de relatie tussen de duo-moeders, het kind en de (on)bekende donor, die vervolgens vanuit ontwikkelingspsychologisch perspectief worden besproken. In het laatste deel van het artikel wordt aandacht besteed aan de voorgestelde wetgeving met betrekking tot de positie van het kind in een gezin met twee moeders, waarbij aan de hand van de ontwikkelingspsychologische bevindingen wordt gekeken naar de kwaliteit van het voorstel.
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    This article focuses upon dual motherhood in the Netherlands from a psychological development/educational and legal perspective. Firstly, attention is paid to the current legal situation and the developments which have recently occurred in this regard. From this, a number of questions arise concerning the relationship between dual mothers, the child and the (un)known donor, which will be discussed from a psychological development perspective. The last part of the article focuses upon the proposed legislation with regard to position of the child in a family with two mothers, examining the quality of the proposal on the basis of the findings concerning psychological development.


Machteld Vonk
Machteld Vonk studied law between 1998 and 2002 at the University of Amsterdam. Following this, she began her PhD at the Molengraaff Institute for Private Law of Utrecht University, under the supervision of Prof. K. Boele-Woelki. Her research looked at the legal relationship between children and non-biological parents from a comparative perspective. In December 2007, she defended her PhD dissertation ‘Children and their parents’ (Intersentia; 2007). From January 2008 until July 2012, she was employed at the Molengraaff Institute as a lecturer/researcher on family law and comparative law. Since 1st July 2012, she has worked in the department of child law of Leiden University as a lecturer/researcher on child law.

Dr. Henny Bos
Henny Bos works as a lecturer at the University of Amsterdam (the department of child development and education and teacher training). Her research concerns gay and lesbian parenthood. She has established a Dutch longitudinal study on this research area, and also participates in an American longitudinal study concerning this subject. From February until the end of June 2012, she was a visiting scholar at the Williams Institute (University of California in Los Angeles).
Article

Access_open Globalization as a Factor in General Jurisprudence

Journal Netherlands Journal of Legal Philosophy, Issue 2 2012
Keywords general jurisprudence, globalization, global legal pluralism, legal positivism, analytical jurisprudence
Authors Sidney Richards
AbstractAuthor's information

    Globalization is commonly cited as an important factor in theorising legal phenomena in the contemporary world. Although many legal disciplines have sought to adapt their theories to globalization, progress has been comparatively modest within contemporary analytical jurisprudence. This paper aims to offer a survey of recent scholarship on legal theory and globalization and suggests various ways in which these writings are relevant to the project of jurisprudence. This paper argues, more specifically, that the dominant interpretation of globalization frames it as a particular form of legal pluralism. The resulting concept – global legal pluralism – comes in two broad varieties, depending on whether it emphasizes normative or institutional pluralism. This paper goes on to argue that these concepts coincide with two central themes of jurisprudence, namely its concern with normativity and institutionality. Finally, this paper reflects on the feasibility of constructing a ‘general’ and ‘descriptive’ jurisprudence in light of globalization.


Sidney Richards
Sidney Richards is Doctoral candidate in Law at Pembroke College at the University of Cambridge.
Article

Challenges Faced by Legislative Drafters in Samoa and Other USP Member Countries

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 2-3 2012
Keywords legislative drafting challenges in Pacific Islands
Authors Mary Victoria Petelō Fa’asau
AbstractAuthor's information

    Legislative drafting is a skill slowly developing in the Pacific today. This abstract identifies and records an update on the challenges to legislative drafting in Pacific island countries. Due to lack of information on legislative drafting in the Pacific, research was undertaken with the assistance of Parliamentary Counsel and other Pacific drafters. I also attended the second biennial meeting of the Pacific Drafters’ Technical Forum in October 2009 where more current challenges were discussed. My own experiences as a legislative drafter are also reflected in this abstract.
    The outcomes of the abstract will show that whereas legislative drafting as a specialised skill is recognised by Pacific governments and interests have grown in pursuing legislative drafting as a career, the challenges faced by Pacific legislative drafters are commonly more diverse and complex. In addition to analysing some of these challenges, this paper offers some recommendations to combating them.


Mary Victoria Petelō Fa’asau
Senior Legislative Drafter, Legislative Drafting Division, Office of the Attorney-General, Samoa; 2011/2012 Greg Urwin Award recipient, Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat; Pacific Legislative Drafters’ Technical Forum; Full member of the Commonwealth Association of Legislative Counsel.
Article

Instructions to Draft Legislation

A Study on Legislative Drafting Process in Rwanda

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 2-3 2012
Keywords drafting instructions, Rwanda, quality of legislation
Authors Ruth Ikiriza
Abstract

    Drafting instructions are always difficult to discuss and evaluate because very often they depend on local traditions. Nevertheless, despite local traditions in drafting instructions their complete absence must be seen as a problem. This article tackles the issue of drafting instructions and their importance in the development of good drafts. And by good drafts the author means good quality drafts which will lead to good quality legislation. The article uses Rwanda as a case study and employs Thornton’s five stages of the drafting process as its basic methodology.


Ruth Ikiriza
Article

Scrutiny of Legislation in Uganda: A Case for Reform

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 2-3 2012
Keywords legislative scrutiny, emerging trends
Authors Isabel Omal
AbstractAuthor's information

    This article seeks to explain the significance of carrying out extensive legislative scrutiny in any jurisdiction, with emphasis being placed on the Ugandan experience as far as legislative scrutiny is done. As Parliaments all over the world continue to make laws that govern their citizens, it is only right that before any law is enacted, there must be adequate mechanism to ensure quality in the law in terms of substance and effect of the legislative proposal which ultimately impacts on good governance. Best practices and emerging trends in legislative scrutiny is drawn from the United Kingdom and Australia, which have put in place elaborate procedures and mechanism to ensure that all their legislative proposals are thoroughly scrutinized before they passed into law: and that even after the law has been enacted, it can be evaluated to see the effect of the law. Pre-legislative scrutiny and post-legislative scrutiny are thus important tools to ensure quality in legislation.


Isabel Omal
The author is a Legislative Lawyer working at the Law Commission in Uganda; she is also a fellow of the Ford Foundation-IFP scholarship and a member of Commonwealth Association of Legislative Counsel (CALC).
Article

Why the Inflation in Legislation on Women’s Bodies?

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 2-3 2012
Keywords legislation and control of women’s bodies, legislative drafting and the female autonomy, social and political theories and control of women’s bodies
Authors Venessa McLean
AbstractAuthor's information

    This article seeks to explore how historical patriarchal theories have crept into the world’s legal systems to date and has led to inflation in legislation upon women’s bodies. The article highlights how legislation has been used as a tool to deny women autonomy over their bodies by placing unnecessary controls upon women’s bodies by legislative, social and political systems and concludes by an examination of the discipline legislative drafting and how an active approach through drafting activism on the part of legislative drafters and policy makers may combat the inflation in legislation upon women’s bodies.


Venessa McLean
The author currently works at The Office of the Chief Parliamentary Counsel in Jamaica as a Legislative Officer. She is also Visiting Lecturer on the Special Narcotic Investigation Course Carribbean Regional Drug Law Enforcement Centre, Jamaica and Visiting Lecturer University of London External Degree Programme.

Dr. Helen Xanthaki
Senior Lecturer and Academic Director, Centre for Legislative Studies, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London, Lawyer (Athens Bar).
Article

Consultation: A Contribution to Efficiency of Drafting Process in Malaysia

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 2-3 2012
Keywords consultation, stakeholders, efficiency of drafting process, elements of efficiency, policy development
Authors Noor Azlina Hashim
AbstractAuthor's information

    Consultation in legislative drafting process is important and widely acknowledged. So far, many countries in the world have taken steps to foster consultation during the early stage of the drafting process. In Malaysia, the importance of opinion from the public or stakeholders in the output of the drafting process was recently evident when several bills presented before the Parliament were criticized because of the failure to take into consideration views and opinions from the public. In some cases, bills were postponed for policy review and refinement. This article examines and discusses consultation practices during the drafting process and analyses and considers the influence of consultation on the efficiency of the drafting process in Malaysia. The influence of consultation practice in relation to the drafting process were shown from a survey conducted on the drafters in the Drafting Division of the Attorney General’s Chambers of Malaysia.


Noor Azlina Hashim
The Attorney General’s Chambers of Malaysia.
Article

The Challenges of Rwandan Drafters in the Drafting Process for Good Quality Legislation

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 2-3 2012
Keywords quality of legislation, Rwanda, drafting process, drafting instructions, language and drafting, precision, clarity
Authors Alain Songa Gashabizi
Abstract

    Rwanda is a country in search a stable legal system, which includes the drafting of quality legislation. Following the events of the 1994 genocide the lack of experienced drafters and the civil law method of decentralized drafting the Rwandan legislation tends to be of bad quality mainly because of the bad quality drafts provided by the various, often unidentifiable sources of drafting. This article spells out the specific problems that the Rwandan drafter faces and offers solutions by means of a case study. The article concludes by making some specific recommendations.


Alain Songa Gashabizi

Olga Volynskaya
International Law Counsel, Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), Russia, aoerjia88@mail.ru.

Mr. Francois Cahuzac
CNES, France, francois.cahuzac@cnes.fr.

Mr. Stephane Louvel
CNES, France, stephane.louvel@cnes.fr.
Article

Teaching Legislative Drafting

The Necessity for Clinical Legal Education

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 1 2012
Keywords clinical legal education, legislative drafting, literature review
Authors Tonye Clinton Jaja
AbstractAuthor's information

    This article makes a case for the application of clinical legal education methods in the teaching of legislative drafting. This need arises to fill the acknowledged gap namely: “the failure of legal education to provide adequate training on the legislative process, statutory interpretation and legislative drafting” considering that there are very few colleges and universities that offer legislative drafting courses. In turn this is a part of a much wider on-going problem in contemporary legal education, namely: “...clinical legal education has not been adopted by many law departments within UK universities”. Using the legislative drafting law clinic at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, University of London as a case study, this paper advocates reasons and justification(s) for the application of clinical legal education methods to facilitate the teaching of legislative drafting skills.


Tonye Clinton Jaja
PhD student, IALS, University of London. The views expressed in this article are my personal opinion and not those of the Legislative Drafting Clinic or the IALS. I accept sole responsibility for the views and errors expressed herein. The author can be contacted by e-mail: tonyeclintonjaja@yahoo.com.
Article

Immigration, Religion and Human Rights

State Policy Challenges in Balancing Public and Private Interests

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 1 2012
Keywords globalization, religious symbols, reasonable accommodations, comparative law, immigration, burqa, human rights
Authors Eric Tardif
AbstractAuthor's information

    Three regions of the world – Western Europe, North America, and Australia – are probably the most popular options when families of emerging countries decide to emigrate in order to better their economic future. As the flow of immigrants establishing themselves in the receiving societies allows for these countries to get culturally richer, it creates, on the other hand, legal tensions as to the extent religious practice is to be accommodated by the governments of secular societies so as to facilitate the insertion of the newcomers into the workplace, social networks, and education system. In order to eliminate or diminish the effect of legal provisions that cause an indirect harm to religious minorities, several countries have taken steps aimed at “reasonably accommodating” them. This paper looks at these efforts made by receiving States, taking into account both the legislative aspect and the interpretation of the statutes and constitutional provisions by national as well as international tribunals; it also gives a critical appreciation of the results that have been obtained in the societies that have implemented those shifts in their legal system.


Eric Tardif
LL.L. (Ottawa); LL.M., LL.D. (National Autonomous University of Mexico - UNAM). The author is currently a Lecturer at the Faculty of Law of the National Autonomous University of Mexico, in the subjects of International and Comparative Law. This document was initially prepared for presentation at the VIIIth World Congress of the International Association of Constitutional Law, held in Mexico City, 6-10 December, 2010; an earlier version of this article was published in the International Journal of Public Law and Policy in 2011.
Article

The Response of National Law to International Conventions and Community Instruments – the Dutch Example

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 1 2012
Keywords Legislative approaches, Private International Law codification, Book 10 of the Dutch Civil Code, Implementation of international instruments, Incorporation by reference
Authors Dorothea van Iterson
AbstractAuthor's information

    This paper, presented at a colloquium at Barcelona University in 2010, outlines the history of the codification of Private International Law (PIL) in the Netherlands, which was completed in 2011 by the introduction of Book 10 of the Dutch Civil Code (conflict of laws). It describes the policy guidelines followed in giving effect to international instruments, i.e. conventions and European legislation. Basically all types of international PIL rules are further regulated at the national level. Moreover, the national PIL codification contains a number of provisions which were borrowed from or inspired by international instruments.


Dorothea van Iterson
Former Counsellor of Legislation, Ministry of Justice of the Netherlands.
Article

Trade in Oil and Export Restrictions

Taking the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries to the WTO Court

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 1 2012
Keywords WTO, dispute settlement, US, OPEC, oil
Authors Bashar H. Malkawi
AbstractAuthor's information

    The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), as seen by observers, resembles a greedy international cartel that preys on the public in defiance of market competition. High oil prices are considered as a principal cause of the US economic woes. Some US congressmen pinpointed OPEC’s alleged inconsistency with the World Trade Organization (WTO) rules and called upon the US administration to open dispute settlement proceedings against OPEC. This article discusses the legal issues arising from a US action at the WTO level against OPEC countries. The first sections of the article comprise an institutional review of the WTO and OPEC. The article addresses the interplay between the WTO and OPEC. It then illustrates the central provisions of the WTO that can be used for arguments and counter-arguments concerning such a WTO action. It culminates with a set of concluding thoughts.


Bashar H. Malkawi
Associate Professor of Commercial Law, University of Sharjah, UAE. He received his LL.B from Yarmouk University in 1999, LL.M from University of Arizona College of Law in 2001, S.J.D from American University, Washington College of Law in 2005. The author would especially like to thank the two outside reviewers for their direction, feedback and invaluable insight. He also thanks the law journal editors and staff writers for their hard work in polishing the article.

Álvaro Fabricio dos Santos
Advocacy General of the Union (AGU), Brazilian Association for Aeronautic and Space Law (SBDA), São José dos Campos, SP, Brazil, alvaro.santos@agu.gov.br.
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