Search result: 2 articles

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Year 2011 x
Article

Stedelijke context en steun voor de PVV

Interetnische nabijheid, economische kansen en cultureel klimaat in 50 Nederlandse steden

Journal Res Publica, Issue 2 2011
Keywords anti-immigrant voting, interethnic contact, ethnic competition, urban cultural atmosphere, bohemian index, gay-scene index
Authors Jeroen van der Waal, Willem de Koster and Peter Achterberg
AbstractAuthor's information

    Some studies find that interethnic propinquity leads to ethnic tolerance, while others conclude that it underlies ethnic conflict. Using data on 50 Dutch cities in 2006 and 2010, this article assesses whether the consequences of interethnic propinquity for votes for Wilders’s PVV – the Dutch anti-immigrant party par excellence – are conditional on the economic and cultural urban contexts in which these contacts take place. In line with the ‘conflict hypothesis’ it is found that a higher level of interethnic propinquity leads to more support for the PVV in cities with a high level of unemployment and an intolerant cultural climate (as measured by the bohemian index and the gay-scene index), whereas the relationship is reverse in cities with low unemployment levels and a tolerant cultural climate (corroborating the ‘contact hypothesis’).


Jeroen van der Waal
Jeroen van der Waal is als socioloog verbonden aan de Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam. Daar verricht hij onderzoek naar 1) de gevolgen van economische mondialisering voor sociale ongelijkheid in geavanceerde economieën, en 2) de gevolgen van culturele veranderingen voor waardenpatronen en stemgedrag in westerse samenlevingen.

Willem de Koster
Willem de Koster is als cultuursocioloog verbonden aan het Centre for Rotterdam Cultural Sociology (CROCUS) van de Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam, waar hij in december 2010 promoveerde op het proefschrift ‘Nowhere I Could Talk Like That’: Togetherness and Identity on Online Forums. Hij publiceerde eerder over verschillende vormen van tolerantie en de culturele conflicten die daarmee gepaard gaan, virtuele gemeenschapsvorming door rechts-extremisten, online participatie door orthodox-protestantse homoseksuelen, keuzestress, maatschappelijk omstreden cartoons, de opkomst van de strafstaat, de publieke rol van religie en verzorgingsstaatschauvinisme.

Peter Achterberg
Peter Achterberg is als cultuursocioloog verbonden aan het Centre for Rotterdam Cultural Sociology (CROCUS) van de Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam. Hij publiceerde onder andere over veranderingen in de politieke cultuur, de legitimiteit van de verzorgingsstaat, culturele globalisering, en de acceptatie van nieuwe technologieën.
Article

Methods and Materials in Constitutional Law

Some Thoughts on Access to Government Information as a Problem for Constitutional Theory and Socio-Legal Studies

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 1 2011
Keywords Citizenship, democracy, government information, representative government, secrecy
Authors Barry Sullivan
AbstractAuthor's information

    To be subject to law, Hobbes argued, is to be deprived of liberty, as we understand it. In this respect, democratic governments are no different from others. Hobbes’s insight has not caused us to abandon our commitments to democracy, but it still challenges us to think hard about the nature of representative government, the nature of citizenship in a democratic society, and the conditions necessary for fulfilling the promise of democratic citizenship. Two recent trends are evident. Some citizens have embraced a more active sense of citizenship, which necessarily entails a more insistent need for information, while governments have insisted on the need for greater concentration of governmental power and a higher degree of secrecy. Much is to be learned from the approaches that various national and transnational regimes have taken with respect to this problem. This essay will consider the problem of access to government information from a comparative perspective and as a problem for constitutional theory and socio-legal studies.


Barry Sullivan
Cooney & Conway Chair in Advocacy and Professor of Law, Loyola University Chicago School of Law.
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