Search result: 11 articles

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Year 2010 x
Article

Karlsruhe v. Lisbon

An Overture to a Constitutional Dialogue from an Estonian Perspective

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 3-4 2010
Keywords constitutional dialogue, Karlsruhe decision, supranationalism
Authors Tanel Kerikmae and Katrin Nyman-Metcalf
Abstract

    The article uses the 2009 decision of the German Constitutional Court on the Lisbon Treaty as a basis for an analysis of the relationship between EU law and Member State law, especially Member State constitutions. The authors argue that an uncritical openness of Member States to supremacy of EU law and the interpretations made of it by the European Court of Justice is not necessary but rather an analytical attitude towards the development of EU with active legal argumentation to protect the rule of law – a deliberative supranationalism. A constitutional dialogue between Member States and the EU is the best protection and promoter of rule of law. The constitutional discussions in Estonia are used as an illustration of the balancing of national constitutional principles and supremacy or EU law.


Tanel Kerikmae

Katrin Nyman-Metcalf
Practice

Bicameralism or Unicameralism

A Case of the United Kingdom and Uganda

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 3-4 2010
Keywords unicameralism, bicameralism, legislative system of Uganda, legislative system of the UK
Authors Esther Majambere
AbstractAuthor's information

    This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of a unicameral legislative system and that of a bicameral legislative system. A unicameral legislature has one chamber whereas a bicameral legislature has two chambers as this article shows in detail.In any democratic state, Parliament is the only organ given power to make laws. Most Constitutions define legislation as the central function of parliament. This is supported by its very name ‘the Legislature’. The law making processes in a unicameral legislature are more less the same as those in a bicameral legislature as this article discusses. The only difference is that in a bicameral system the law has to be approved by both chambers. The article therefore explores whether the second chamber is necessary.Bicameralism seems to work best in countries that are larger or socially and ethnically diverse. It helps to resolve regional conflict. In some countries with a bicameral legislative system, the upper house is used as a way of reserving representation for certain societal groups and or to replace a further check on the power of the Lower House. The Parliament of UK is a bicameral legislature with the House of Lords (upper house) and the House of Commons (lower house). The House of Lords includes two different types of members- the Lord Spiritual (the senior bishops of the Church of England) and the Lords Temporal (members of the peerage upper ranks of the British nobility) elected by the population at large, but are appointed by the sovereign on the advice of the Prime Minister. The House of Lords also performed a judicial role through the Law Lords prior to the opening of the Supreme Court. In theory, supreme legislative power is vested in the Queen-in-Parliament; in practice real power is vested in the House of Commons, as will be discussed in this article. Therefore how many chamber a parliament should have is a controversial question in constitutional law.


Esther Majambere
Esther Majambere is a Senior Legal Officer at the Uganda Law Reform Commission in Kampala, Uganda.
Article

What Critiques Have Been Made of the Socratic Method in Legal Education?

The Socratic Method in Legal Education: Uses, Abuses and Beyond

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 3-4 2010
Keywords Socratic method, legal education, learning theory, critical thinking, feminist pedagogy
Authors Christie A. Linskens Christie
AbstractAuthor's information

    Legal education is known for its use of the Socratic method. It appears, however, that the Socratic method may not be just for law students any more: American educators are now considering the method in the teaching of non-law school students. One perceived benefit of teaching by the Socratic method is that a student will learn by critical thinking rather than rote memorization. A major criticism of the method, however, is that a student may suffer low self-esteem from the perception that the method engages in ‘bullying’. The articles discussed in this literature review address the method in learning theory, the method in law school, criticisms of the method and proposals to use the method for non-law students. This article will analyze the Socratic method, the pros and cons of the method and its application outside of the law school.


Christie A. Linskens Christie
Christie A. Linskens Christie is a PhD Student, Urban Education at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Adjunct Professor at Marquette University Law School and Staff Attorney, Legal Aid Society of Milwaukee, Inc.
Article

The ECJ Ruling in Cartesio and Its Consequences on the Right of Establishment and Corporate Mobility in the European Union

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 3-4 2010
Keywords Cartesio, right of establishment, Corporate mobility
Authors Prof. dr.sc. Siniša Petrović and Tomislav Jakšić
AbstractAuthor's information

    Before Cartesio, the case law of the European Court of Justice on freedom of establishment mainly considered company immigration situations, i.e. legal entities moving into another Member State. Cartesio is the first major ruling on company emigration since the 1988 decision in Daily Mail. Consequently, much was expected from Cartesio, notably that it would confirm a company’s right to directly invoke its freedom of establishment in emigration scenarios. However, this was not the case. Although Cartesio introduced some new concepts into the freedom of establishment case law like the concept of company conversion, the freedom of establishment actually took a step backward. This effectively resulted in almost complete disregard of the freedom of establishment in emigration situations - unlike in immigration situations. This partial denial of freedom of establishment, one of the fundamental freedoms of Community law, would seem urge the continuation of work on the new 14th Company Law Directive. In light of the current ECJ case law, only a legislative approach would seem suitable to guarantee non-discrimination in the ongoing regulatory competition between Member States which apply the registered seat theory and those which apply the administrative (real) seat theory.


Prof. dr.sc. Siniša Petrović
Prof. dr. sc. Siniša Petrović is a full professor at the Faculty of Law of the University of Zagreb.

Tomislav Jakšić
Tomislav Jakšić is a Junior Researcher at the Faculty of Law of the University of Zagreb.
Article

The Right to Food

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 3-4 2010
Keywords food crisis, right to food
Authors Ying Chen
AbstractAuthor's information

    With the development of society, new agricultural technologies have been widely introduced and effectively applied to agricultural cultivation. Agricultural productive capacity has greatly improved and the world’s food producers are capable of providing all the people on this planet with sufficient food to satisfy everyday dietary needs for a healthy life. Ironically, food insecurity continues to be a critical issue in the contemporary world. More than 923 million people suffer from chronic hunger, malnutrition or related diseases, and this number grows with continually rising food prices. This article responds to the current food insecurity by addressing a new issue: is there any legal basis for both the international community and national governments to protect vulnerable people from hunger and malnutrition?


Ying Chen
S.J.D. Candidate, LL.M., Indiana University School of Law Indianapolis.
Article

Establishing Protection Mechanisms for Bureaucrats

The Case of the Independent Oversight Board of Civil Service of Kosovo

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 1-2 2010
Keywords Kosovo Civil Service, Civil service, Oversight Board, law, reform
Authors Dren Doli, Fisnik Korenica and Artan Rogova
AbstractAuthor's information

    This article discusses the position and powers of Kosovo’s Civil Service Oversight Board, mainly from a legal perspective. The article describes the reforms undertaken upon the Board and the civil service in Kosovo, while illustrating the central pillars of concern in regard to both the international presence and domestic institutions in Kosovo. The article then explains the three reforms and reviews each of the main legal changes the Board and the civil system have experienced, respectively. The last section of the article comprises an institutional review of the powers and the position of the current framework on the Civil Service Oversight Board, while allowing a part of the article to question its independence and pluralism. The article culminates with policy suggestions that would make the work of the Board, and the entire civil service, more independent and accountable to its mission.


Dren Doli
Dren Doli is a Senior Research Fellow at the Group for Legal and Political Studies, and a Senior Lecturer on Law Principles at Universum University College, having served earlier as a Senior Legal Executive for Integration to the Kosovo Prime Minister.

Fisnik Korenica
Fisnik Korenica is a Lecturer on the Theory of State and Law at the University of Prishtina, and a Senior Research Fellow at the Group for Legal and Political Studies.

Artan Rogova
Artan Rogova is a Senior Research Fellow at the Group for Legal and Political Studies, as a Lecturer on Economics of European Integration at Universum University College.
Article

Beyond the Looking Glass: The Application of Public Choice Theory to U.S. Commercial Communication Satellite Export Controls

Nandasiri Jasentuliyana Keynote Lecture on Space Law & 2nd Young Scholars Session

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 1 2010
Authors M. Mineiro

M. Mineiro

Willem H. van Boom
Professor of Law at the Erasmus School of Law, Erasmus University Rotterdam.

Anthony Ogus
Professor of Fundamentals of Private Law at Erasmus University Rotterdam; Emeritus Professor of Law at the University of Manchester.

Nick Huls
Professor of Socio-Legal Studies, Erasmus School of Law and Leiden Law School.

Elena Fagotto
Rotterdam Institute of Law and Economics, Erasmus University Rotterdam; Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, Harvard Kennedy School. E-mail: fagotto@frg.eur.nl. The author wishes to thank Alessandra Arcuri, Michael Faure, participants in the European Society for Risk Analysis Conference in London (June 2010) and an anonymous referee for valuable comments. I am also deeply indebted to Archon Fung at Harvard Kennedy School.

Bernd van der Meulen
B.M.J. van der Meulen is Professor of Law and Governance at Wageningen University, the Netherlands <http://www.law.wur.nl/uk>; Chairman of the Dutch Food Law Association <http://www.nvlr.nl>; Director of the European Institute for Food Law <http://www.food-law.nl>; member of the Board of Directors of the European Food Law Association <http://www.efla-aeda.org>; and member of the Editorial Board of the European Food and Feed Law Review <http://www.lexxion.eu/effl>. This contribution elaborates on previous publications, such as: Bernd van der Meulen and Menno van der Velde, European Food Law Handbook (2008), available at: <http://www.wageningenacademic.com/foodlaw>; Irene Scholten-Verheijen, Bernd van der Meulen and Theo Appelhof, Landkaart levensmiddelenrecht (2009); and Bernd van der Meulen, Harry Bremmers, Leon Geyer, Nidhi Gupta and Hans Bouwmeester, Nano Food Regulation: Towards an Adaptive Regulatory Infrastructure for Nanotechnology Applications in the Food Sector (forthcoming). Many thanks to Prof. Margaret Rosso Grossman, Anna Szajkowska and Irene Scholten-Verheijen for their valuable comments and suggestions. Comments are welcome at <Bernd.vanderMeulen@wur.nl>.
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