Search result: 8 articles

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Year 2009 x

Yue Fu
Research associate, Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Japan.

Giuseppe Martinico
Lecturer in Law at the University of Pisa; PhD, Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa. I would like to thank Emanuele Pollio for his comments and Andrea Serafino and Alberto Montagner for their help in preparing a preliminary version of this work.

Giuseppe Martinico

Oreste Pollicino

Vincenzo Sciarabba
Paragraphs B and D have been written by Giuseppe Martinico (STALS Senior Assistant Editor, Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna); paragraphs C and F by Oreste Pollicino (Associate Professor in Comparative Public Law, Bocconi University, Milan); paragraphs A and E by Vincenzo Sciarabba (Post-doc Researcher in Comparative Public Law, University of Pavia). For the idea of the “untouchable core” see, N. Lavranos, Revisiting Article 307 EC: The Untouchable Core of Fundamental European Constitutional Law Values, in F. Fontanelli, G. Martinico & P. Carrozza, (Eds.), Shaping Rule of Law Through Dialogue: International and Supranational Experiences (forthcoming).
Hoofdartikel

Access_open Responsibility Incorporated

Journal Netherlands Journal of Legal Philosophy, Issue 2 2009
Keywords corporate agency, corporate responsibility, collective responsibility
Authors prof. Philip Pettit
AbstractAuthor's information

    Incorporated groups include businesses, universities, churches and the like. Organized to act as single centers of agency, they also routinely satisfy the three conditions that make an agent fit to be held responsible: they face significant choices, can recognize the relative value of different options, and are able to choose in sensitivity to such values. But is it redundant to hold a corporate agent responsible for something, when certain members are also held responsible for the individual parts they play? No it is not, for it is often possible for a corporate entity to be fully fit to be held responsible, when this is not true of the individual members; they may be able to make excuses that are not available at the corporate level. Does the case made for corporate responsibility extend to unincorporated collectivities like nations or religions? Not strictly but it does explain why it may be sensible to treat those collectivities as if they had corporate responsibility in certain domains.


prof. Philip Pettit
Philip Pettit is the Laurence S. Rockefeller University Professor of Politics and Human Values at Princeton University.
Article

Access_open ‘The Soviet Union did not have a legal system’

An interview with Jeremy Waldron on the methodology debate, historic injustice and the citation of foreign law

Journal Netherlands Journal of Legal Philosophy, Issue 1 2009
Keywords normative positivism, historic injustice, restitution of property rights, citation of foreign law, methodology debate
Authors Kees Quist and Wouter Veraart
AbstractAuthor's information

    This interview with Jeremy Waldron covers three topics. Firstly, we dealt with the methodology debate, that is, the discussion about how to proceed in analyzing the nature of law. Does the question ‘What is law?’ require a descriptive analysis of the concept of law or, rather, a normative exercise in political philosophy? Secondly, we spoke about the role of law in response to historic injustice, especially in relation to the restitution of property rights. On this topic Waldron vindicates the ‘supersession-thesis’, the idea that, due to changed circumstances and the passage of time, historic injustices become superseded. The third section of the interview is devoted to Waldron’s perspective on the citation of foreign law by national judges.


Kees Quist
Kees Quist is junior lecturer and PhD fellow at Utrecht Law School.

Wouter Veraart
Wouter Veraart is professor of Legal Philosophy at the VU University Amsterdam.
Case Law

Access_open Maritime Delimitation in the Black Sea (Romania v. Ukraine)

Case concerning Maritime Delimitation in the Black Sea (Romania v. Ukraine), Merits, Judgment, 3 February 2009

Journal Hague Justice Journal, Issue 1 2009
Authors Alex Oude Elferink
Author's information

Alex Oude Elferink
Senior Research Associate, Netherlands Institute for the Law of the Sea, Utrecht University.

Siri Gloppen
Professor of Comparative Politics, University of Bergen and Head of the Courts in Transition research programme at the Chr. Michelsen Institute, Bergen, Norway. The author would like to thank Ole Frithjof Norheim, Bruce M. Wilson and the anonymous referees for constructive comments.

Abiola O. Makinwa
Abiola Makinwa is a doctoral candidate at the Department of Private International and Comparative Law, Faculty of Law, Erasmus University Rotterdam. The author would like to thank Professor Nicholas Dorn for his comments on the first draft of this paper. The usual disclaimer applies.
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