Search result: 21 articles

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Year 2012 x
Article

What Virtues and Formalities Can Do for Corporate Social Responsibility and the Rule of Law in China?

仁 礼 誠 人, 人 必 治 法, 法 修 其 德, 德 治 其 國

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 4 2012
Keywords Chinese rule of law, Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), sustainability, Confucianism, formative free speech
Authors Jin Kong
AbstractAuthor's information

    This article explores sustainability problems in China and foreign interests on the ‘rule of law’ problems there. The article undertakes an organic process improvement method (Define, Measure, Analyze, Control – ‘DMAC’) in hope to improve the west’s expectations of China and China’s own becoming of a rule of law nation. Corruption and environmental problems are of particular interest; China’s legal and political reform histories serve as our starting point; synergies between Confucian mercantile philosophy and modern corporate social responsibility principles are the undertones. The article will first Define the scope of China’s environmental, social, and economic problems; it will Measure the effects of these problems by observing the ontological and metaphysical uniqueness of the Chinese notion of ‘rule of law’ from a historical perspective; the Analysis will involve identifying synergies between Confucianism and Corporate Social Responsibility (hereinafter ‘CSR’); from these observations, this article will submit to Controling steps. Consequently, this article recognizes the need for ‘humanity’ and ‘formality’, in the Chinese sense, to aid one’s becoming of a law-biding person in China. The Chinese people will Control the laws that matter to them; those laws will evolve to cure the virtues of the people they are to govern.


Jin Kong
Jin Kong is a JD Candidate at the Robert H. McKinney School of Law. Jin also writes on the topic of sustainability at his blog, The Green Elephant (dot) US – <www.thegreenelephant.us>. The Chinese subtitle is loosely translated as follows: ‘If there is humanity and formality to aid one’s becoming a law-abiding person in China, they wil control the laws that matter to them; those laws will surely cure the virtues of its people and it is from those virtues a nation can govern.’
Article

Occurrence of Disruptive Behaviour in Dutch Civil Procedures

An Empirical Study

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 4 2012
Keywords civil procedure, case management, procedural justice, procedural sanctions, procedural rules
Authors Martin Gramatikov and Stéphanie van Gulijk
AbstractAuthor's information

    In 2002, the civil procedure in the Netherlands was reformed. A fairly simple system of positive and negative stimuli was set up in order to ensure that the civil process develops in an efficient and timely manner. In this article, we explore the prevalence of process-disturbing behaviour as well as the response of the judges to such behaviour. Ninety eight civil cases were observed. We also conducted interviews with judges, lawyers and parties involved in these cases. The main finding is that in almost all cases there is at least one process-disturbing behaviour. On average there are 3.4 instances of such behaviour per case. Most often the disturbing behaviour is part of the categories communication problems. As it concerns the reaction of the judges, we see patterns of various strategies. Judges are not immediately responding actively to disturbing behaviour. However, when a certain threshold has been reached, the judges tend to take active steps and apply the tools they have. Most often, judges use different sorts of communication interventions. Procedural instruments for counteracting disturbing behaviour are used vey rarely. Our interpretation is that judges in the Netherlands are concerned about process efficiency but are also aware of the procedural justice and particularly interpersonal justice aspects of the process. We recommend that initial and ongoing legal education and training pays more attention on the communication and interpersonal skills and abilities involved in dispute resolution.


Martin Gramatikov
Martin Grammatikov is senior researcher at Tilburg University, Private Law department, and Head of Measurement and Evaluation at the Hague Institute for the Internationalisation of Law.

Stéphanie van Gulijk
Stéphanie van Gulijk is senior researcher and lecturer at Tilburg University, Private Law department, and Legal counsel at Poelmann van den Broek Laywers. Both authors cooperated in the research project that is central in this paper: M. Barendrecht, S. van Gulijk, M. Gramatikov, P. Sluijter, De goede procesorde in beeld. Over gedrag van procespartijen en de regiefunctie van de rechter, in Research Memoranda Raad voor de rechtspraak, nummer 1-2011, jaargang 7.
Article

Gender Equality Laws in the Post Socialist States of Central and Eastern Europe

Mainstream Fixture or Fizzer?

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 4 2012
Keywords gender equality laws, enforcement mechanisms, rule of law, post-socialist states, European Union
Authors Christine Forster and Vedna Jivan
AbstractAuthor's information

    In Central and Eastern European countries, the enactment of gender equality laws (GELs), defined as stand-alone national legislation that provide an overarching legislative response to gender discrimination as distinct from the traditional approach of incorporating gender equality provisions into existing legislation or constitutions, has been a marked regional trend since the collapse of the Soviet Union. However, rather than being driven by domestic movements for change, GELs seem primarily to have emerged due to pressure from development agencies, potential trading partners and donor organisations which predicate their assistance and business on the establishment of the ‘rule of law’ and of particular relevance in the region the desire to join the European Union (EU), which requires potential members to introduce gender equality legislation as part of the communtaire aquis. Despite the widespread enactment of GELs in the region, research suggests that the implementation of GELs has been slow, inefficient and in some cases non-existent. Reasons posited for this include a lack of judicial familiarity with new concepts contained in the legislation, the use of legislation taken from models in existing member states, lack of information disseminated about the new laws to relevant parties, weak political support and capacity weakness in states that are resource stretched. This article considers a further reason – the weakness of the enforcement and implementation mechanisms in the laws themselves and argues that despite the placement of expansive positive duties on a range of public and private actors in many of the GELs, the implementation and enforcement mechanisms of the fifteen GELs considered are weak. Consequently, despite their remarkable scope the duties created under the GELs are largely symbolic and will continue to be so unless, such legislation is amended to include mechanisms to enable the realization of those duties in practice.


Christine Forster
Christine Forster is a senior lecturer at the Faculty of Law of the University of New South Wales, Australia.

Vedna Jivan
Vedna Jivan is Senior Lecturer, UTS Faculty of Law, Australia.
Discussion

Access_open ‘We Are Also Here.’ Whose Revolution Will Democracy Be?

Journal Netherlands Journal of Legal Philosophy, Issue 3 2012
Keywords democracy, public sphere, civil society, Arab Spring, feminism
Authors Judith Vega
AbstractAuthor's information

    Steven Winter’s argument is premised on a sharp contrast of individualist and social revolutions. I elaborate my doubts about his argument on three accounts, involving feminist perspectives at various points. First, I take issue with Winter’s portrayal of liberal theory, redirecting the focus of his concern to economic libertarianism rather than liberalism, and arguing a more hospitable attitude to the Kantian pith in the theory of democracy. Secondly, I discuss his conceptualization of democracy, adding the conceptual distinction of civil society and public sphere. Thirdly, I question his normative notion of socially situated selves as having an intrinsic relation to social freedom. I moreover consult cultural history on the gendered symbolics of market and democracy to further problematize Winter’s take on either’s meaning for social freedom.


Judith Vega
Judith Vega is Lecturer in Social and Political Philosophy at the University of Groningen, the Netherlands.
Discussion

Access_open ‘Nothing Spells Freedom Like a Hooters Meal’

Journal Netherlands Journal of Legal Philosophy, Issue 3 2012
Keywords Enlightenment universalism, self-governance, freedom, moral point of view, political participation
Authors Ronald Tinnevelt
AbstractAuthor's information

    Winter’s criticism of the conventional account of freedom and democracy is best understood against the background of the history of Enlightenment critique. Winter claims that our current misunderstanding of freedom and self-governance is the result of the strict dichotomy between subject and object. This paper critically reconstructs Winter’s notion of freedom and self-governance which does not adequately address (a) the details of his anti-collectivist claim, and (b) the necessary conditions for the possibility of a moral point of view. This makes it difficult to determine how Winter can distinguish between freedom and lack of freedom, and to assess the limited or radical nature of his critique of Enlightenment universalism.


Ronald Tinnevelt
Ronald Tinnevelt is Associate Professor Philosophy of Law at Radboud University, Nijmegen.
Discussion

Access_open Political Freedom after Economic Freefall and Democratic Revolt

Journal Netherlands Journal of Legal Philosophy, Issue 3 2012
Keywords globalisation, civic tradition, Enlightenment, free-market economy, autonomy
Authors Tinneke Beeckman
AbstractAuthor's information

    Can globalisation lead to more democracy? And if so, what concept of freedom lies at the basis of this development? The ideal of liberal freedom, supposedly exercised by the autonomous, rational individual is no longer tenable. Finding a new way of interpreting self-rule beyond self-interested choice has become a crucial aspect of regenerating democratic spirit. This paper formulates three comments on Winter’s paper. The first comment concerns the resemblance between the attitudes of consumers and voters. A second comment reflects on the positive heritage of the Enlightenment. A third comment focuses on the recent Tahrir Square protests and reflects on the republican civic tradition.


Tinneke Beeckman
Tinneke Beeckman is postdoctoral researcher at the Fund for Scientific Research, Flanders, University of Brussels.

    In this reply, Steven L. Winter adresses his critics.


Steven L. Winter

Susan Myres JD
Susan Myres is the principal at Myres and Associates, PLLC located in Houston, Texas; www.myresfamilylaw.com, smyres@myresfamilylaw.com. She is a member of the Board of Managers of the International Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, USA Chapter. She is secretary of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers.

Christopher Flynn MD
Menninger Clinic, Houston, TX, USA, cflynn@menninger.edu.

    In dit artikel wordt aandacht besteed aan duo-moederschap in Nederland vanuit een ontwikkelingspsychologisch/pedagogisch en een juridisch perspectief. Allereerst wordt aandacht besteed aan de huidige juridische situatie en de ontwikkelingen die zich recent daarin hebben voorgedaan. Uit deze bespreking rijst een aantal vragen met betrekking tot de relatie tussen de duo-moeders, het kind en de (on)bekende donor, die vervolgens vanuit ontwikkelingspsychologisch perspectief worden besproken. In het laatste deel van het artikel wordt aandacht besteed aan de voorgestelde wetgeving met betrekking tot de positie van het kind in een gezin met twee moeders, waarbij aan de hand van de ontwikkelingspsychologische bevindingen wordt gekeken naar de kwaliteit van het voorstel.
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    This article focuses upon dual motherhood in the Netherlands from a psychological development/educational and legal perspective. Firstly, attention is paid to the current legal situation and the developments which have recently occurred in this regard. From this, a number of questions arise concerning the relationship between dual mothers, the child and the (un)known donor, which will be discussed from a psychological development perspective. The last part of the article focuses upon the proposed legislation with regard to position of the child in a family with two mothers, examining the quality of the proposal on the basis of the findings concerning psychological development.


Machteld Vonk
Machteld Vonk studied law between 1998 and 2002 at the University of Amsterdam. Following this, she began her PhD at the Molengraaff Institute for Private Law of Utrecht University, under the supervision of Prof. K. Boele-Woelki. Her research looked at the legal relationship between children and non-biological parents from a comparative perspective. In December 2007, she defended her PhD dissertation ‘Children and their parents’ (Intersentia; 2007). From January 2008 until July 2012, she was employed at the Molengraaff Institute as a lecturer/researcher on family law and comparative law. Since 1st July 2012, she has worked in the department of child law of Leiden University as a lecturer/researcher on child law.

Dr. Henny Bos
Henny Bos works as a lecturer at the University of Amsterdam (the department of child development and education and teacher training). Her research concerns gay and lesbian parenthood. She has established a Dutch longitudinal study on this research area, and also participates in an American longitudinal study concerning this subject. From February until the end of June 2012, she was a visiting scholar at the Williams Institute (University of California in Los Angeles).

    Deze studie beoogt empirische inzichten te verschaffen in de socio-juridische context van Vlaamse echtscheidingsovereenkomsten. Meer specifiek: er is empirisch onderzoek verricht naar de determinanten van echtscheidingsakkoorden (ex ante context), alsook naar de effecten die deze regelingen sorteren (ex post context). Door toepassing van de sociaalwetenschappelijke methodologie binnen het familierecht voorziet deze empirische analyse in brede kwantitatieve gegevens die als basis kunnen dienen voor toekomstige beleidsmatige beslissingen. Daarnaast kunnen de empirische bevindingen bijdragen tot de optimalisatie van de redactie van echtscheidingsovereenkomsten.
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    This research aims to provide empirical insights into the socio-legal context of mutual consent divorce agreements. More specifically, this empirical-legal study investigates the determinants of divorce arrangements (i.e. the ex ante context)  as well as the effects of these arrangements (i.e. the ex post context). By using statistical techniques of the social sciences (i.e. regression analysis), this empirical analysis provides in broad quantitative data that serve as a basis for future policy decisions. This article concludes that this empirical findings contribute to the optimization of divorce agreement drafting.


Dr. Ruben Hemelsoen
Ruben Hemelsoen has a doctorate in law, and master’s degrees in law and psychology. He is currently head of student affairs at University College Ghent. Alongside this, the author works as a voluntary researcher at the civil law department of the Faculty of Law of Ghent University.
Article

Why the Inflation in Legislation on Women’s Bodies?

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 2-3 2012
Keywords legislation and control of women’s bodies, legislative drafting and the female autonomy, social and political theories and control of women’s bodies
Authors Venessa McLean
AbstractAuthor's information

    This article seeks to explore how historical patriarchal theories have crept into the world’s legal systems to date and has led to inflation in legislation upon women’s bodies. The article highlights how legislation has been used as a tool to deny women autonomy over their bodies by placing unnecessary controls upon women’s bodies by legislative, social and political systems and concludes by an examination of the discipline legislative drafting and how an active approach through drafting activism on the part of legislative drafters and policy makers may combat the inflation in legislation upon women’s bodies.


Venessa McLean
The author currently works at The Office of the Chief Parliamentary Counsel in Jamaica as a Legislative Officer. She is also Visiting Lecturer on the Special Narcotic Investigation Course Carribbean Regional Drug Law Enforcement Centre, Jamaica and Visiting Lecturer University of London External Degree Programme.
Article

De selectie van verkiesbare kandidaten

Een analyse van de Belgische Kamerverkiezingen 1999-2010

Journal Res Publica, Issue 3 2012
Keywords candidate selection, representation, Belgium
Authors Gert-Jan Put and Bart Maddens
AbstractAuthor's information

    In a closed or semi-open PR-system, the designation of the MPs is primarily determined by their position on the list. In this paper, we attempt to find out on the basis of which criteria a party selects the candidates who are most likely to be elected, due to their high and/or visible position on the list. We do so by comparing these realistic candidates with the candidates on unrealistic positions on the list. A multi-level logistic regression analysis of the Flemish candidates in four subsequent federal elections in Belgium shows that the selectorates have a marked preference for incumbents and for mayors. Aldermen also stand a better chance of being elected, but only if they are from a larger communality. Women are strongly underrepresented amongst the realistic candidates, but this is only due to the fact that there are relatively few women mayors and incumbents.


Gert-Jan Put
Gert-Jan Put is als aspirant van het FWO verbonden aan het Centrum voor Politicologie van de KULeuven. Hij bereidt een proefschrift voor over de geografische strategie van partijen bij verkiezingen.

Bart Maddens
Bart Maddens is hoogleraar aan het Centrum voor Politicologie van de KULeuven. Hij doet onderzoek over partij- en campagnefinanciering en politieke partijen in multilevelsystemen.
Article

Vertegenwoordiging van oude en nieuwe breuklijnen in de Lage Landen

Journal Res Publica, Issue 3 2012
Keywords group representation, members of parliament, Low Countries, class, gender, ethnicity
Authors Karen Celis and Bram Wauters
AbstractAuthor's information

    This article investigates whether group-based politics is still relevant in Belgian and Dutch politics. Based on the PARTIREP MP Survey it more precisely studies the extent to which Belgian and Dutch parliamentarians in comparison to other European countries attach importance to the representation of ‘old’ cleavage groups (class and religious groups) or new groups (age groups, women and ethnic minorities), and which strategies are considered most appropriate. Group representation of old and new groups is found to be of great importance in both countries. Class is not dead and age groups are also highly represented. In contrast, religious groups and ethnic minorities receive far less attention in the Low Countries. Notwithstanding these similarities, there is also cross-country variation regarding the level of importance (greater in the Netherlands), the represented groups and the strategies for representation.


Karen Celis
Karen Celis is als onderzoeksprofessor verbonden aan de Vakgroep Politieke Wetenschappen van de Vrije Universiteit Brussel. Zij verricht onderzoek naar de politieke representatie van groepen (vrouwen, etnische minderheden, LBGT, leeftijdsgroepen en sociale klassen).

Bram Wauters
Bram Wauters is docent aan de Faculteit Handelswetenschappen en Bestuurskunde van de Hogeschool Gent en gastdocent aan de Faculteit Politieke en Sociale Wetenschappen van de Universiteit Gent. Zijn onderzoek gaat over politieke vertegenwoordiging, electorale systemen en politieke partijen.
Article

Immigration, Religion and Human Rights

State Policy Challenges in Balancing Public and Private Interests

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 1 2012
Keywords globalization, religious symbols, reasonable accommodations, comparative law, immigration, burqa, human rights
Authors Eric Tardif
AbstractAuthor's information

    Three regions of the world – Western Europe, North America, and Australia – are probably the most popular options when families of emerging countries decide to emigrate in order to better their economic future. As the flow of immigrants establishing themselves in the receiving societies allows for these countries to get culturally richer, it creates, on the other hand, legal tensions as to the extent religious practice is to be accommodated by the governments of secular societies so as to facilitate the insertion of the newcomers into the workplace, social networks, and education system. In order to eliminate or diminish the effect of legal provisions that cause an indirect harm to religious minorities, several countries have taken steps aimed at “reasonably accommodating” them. This paper looks at these efforts made by receiving States, taking into account both the legislative aspect and the interpretation of the statutes and constitutional provisions by national as well as international tribunals; it also gives a critical appreciation of the results that have been obtained in the societies that have implemented those shifts in their legal system.


Eric Tardif
LL.L. (Ottawa); LL.M., LL.D. (National Autonomous University of Mexico - UNAM). The author is currently a Lecturer at the Faculty of Law of the National Autonomous University of Mexico, in the subjects of International and Comparative Law. This document was initially prepared for presentation at the VIIIth World Congress of the International Association of Constitutional Law, held in Mexico City, 6-10 December, 2010; an earlier version of this article was published in the International Journal of Public Law and Policy in 2011.
Article

Is gender bias een mythe?

Op zoek naar verklaringen voor de beperkte aanwezigheid van vrouwelijke politici in het Vlaamse televisienieuws

Journal Res Publica, Issue 2 2012
Keywords gender, mediated politics, news coverage, journalism, television news, Flanders
Authors Debby Vos
AbstractAuthor's information

    This study analyses the news coverage of female politicians in Flanders (Belgium). We investigate whether the deficiency of media attention for female politicians is due to structural factors or whether the news media themselves create a gender bias. For this purpose, we examine eleven possible explanations for the gender bias. On one hand the characteristics of the politicians, such as their function, can influence their news exposure and on the other hand the features of the news media, such as the broadcasting station, can be of importance. Overall, our evidence suggests that mainly the function determines the news exposure of female politicians and not their gender. Nevertheless, female politicians still get less speaking time, even when controlling for all other variables. We can conclude that a real gender bias exists in the Flemish television news: journalists and editors give significantly less attention to female politicians compared to their male colleagues.


Debby Vos
Debby Vos is als doctoraal onderzoeker verbonden aan de onderzoeksgroep Media, Middenveld en Politiek (M2P) binnen de Universiteit Antwerpen. Zij doet onderzoek naar de media-aandacht die politici krijgen en de determinanten daarvan.
Article

Access_open Public and Private Regulation

Mapping the Labyrinth

Journal The Dovenschmidt Quarterly, Issue 1 2012
Keywords private regulation, regulatory impact assessment, standard-setting, voluntary certification, sustainabbility reporting, effectiveness indicators, governance indicators
Authors Fabrizio Cafaggi and Andrea Renda
AbstractAuthor's information

    Private governance is currently being evoked as a viable solution to many public policy goals. However, in some circumstances it has shown to produce more harm than good, and even disastrous consequences like in the case of the financial crisis that is raging in most advanced economies. Although the current track record of private regulatory schemes is mixed, policy guidance documents around the world still require that policymakers award priority to self- and co-regulation, with little or no additional guidance being given to policymakers to devise when, and under what circumstances, these solutions can prove viable from a public policy perspective. With an array of examples from several policy fields, this paper approaches regulation as a public-private collaborative form and attempts to identify possible policy tools to be applied by public policymakers to efficiently and effectively approach private governance as a solution, rather than a problem. We propose a six-step theoretical framework and argue that IA techniques should: (i) define an integrated framework including both the possibility that private regulation can be used as an alternative or as a complement to public legislation; (ii) Involve private parties in public IAs in order to define the best strategy or strategies that would ensure achievement of the regulatory objectives; and (iii) Contemplate the deployment of indicators related to governance and activities of the regulators and their ability to coordinate and solve disputes with other regulators.


Fabrizio Cafaggi
European University Institute, Fiesole Università di Trento (F. Cafaggi).

Andrea Renda
LUISS Guido Carli, Rome; Centre for European Policy Studies, Brussels; European University Institute, Fiesole (A. Renda).

Kristin Henrard
Professor of Minority Protection at the Erasmus University Rotterdam.
Article

Waar en wanneer spreken mannen en vrouwen over politiek?

De sekseverschillen in politieke discussie in hun sociale en politieke context

Journal Res Publica, Issue 1 2012
Keywords deliberative democracy, political talk, gender differences, Belgium
Authors Didier Caluwaerts
AbstractAuthor's information

    Deliberative democrats claim that political deliberation among citizens increases the legitimacy of and support for democratic decision-making. The question is, however, whether deliberative democracy can realize its added value in the real world of politics where political discussion is characterized by persisting inequalities. This paper tries to contextualize the gender gap in political talk by taking into account the social (i.e., discussion networks) and political context (i.e., campaign effects) in which political debate takes place. Based on previous research we argue that women prefer to discuss politics in relatively like-minded, cohesive networks, while men prefer more confrontational networks. Moreover, we expect the gender gap to depend on the electoral context, in that the gender gap disappears in later campaign phases. These two arguments were tested and confirmed using data gathered in the Partirep Regional Election Survey in 2009.


Didier Caluwaerts
Didier Caluwaerts is postdoctoraal onderzoeker in de Vakgroep Politieke Wetenschappen van de VUB. Zijn onderzoek gaat over deliberatieve democratie in diep verdeelde samenlevingen.
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