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Article

In Search of the Current Legal Status of the Registration of Space Objects

The Current Status of the Rule of Law with Regard to Space Activities

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 4 2010
Authors S. Aoki

S. Aoki

    Contemporary literature on the use of force has been saturated with arguments and counter arguments relating to the extant regime of the use of force as it should relate to non-state actors. The discussions have however proceeded on the assumption that the problem of the unregulated use of force by non-state entities is limited to group of persons – unorganised non-state actors – pursuing legitimate or non-legitimate agenda. The arguments seems to overlook the existence of a group of States (organised non-state actors) – international organisations – which pose even greater threat to the Charter paradigm of the use of force than unorganised non-state actors. This article discusses the Charter regime on the use of force with particular attention to organised non-state actors and the challenges they posed to the prohibition of the use of force.


Amos O. Enabulele
Amos O. Enabulele LL.M, BL is Lecturer at the Department of Jurisprudence & International Law, Faculty of Law, University of Benin, Nigeria and a Ph.D. candidate at Brunel University, West London.
Practice

Bicameralism or Unicameralism

A Case of the United Kingdom and Uganda

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 3-4 2010
Keywords unicameralism, bicameralism, legislative system of Uganda, legislative system of the UK
Authors Esther Majambere
AbstractAuthor's information

    This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of a unicameral legislative system and that of a bicameral legislative system. A unicameral legislature has one chamber whereas a bicameral legislature has two chambers as this article shows in detail.In any democratic state, Parliament is the only organ given power to make laws. Most Constitutions define legislation as the central function of parliament. This is supported by its very name ‘the Legislature’. The law making processes in a unicameral legislature are more less the same as those in a bicameral legislature as this article discusses. The only difference is that in a bicameral system the law has to be approved by both chambers. The article therefore explores whether the second chamber is necessary.Bicameralism seems to work best in countries that are larger or socially and ethnically diverse. It helps to resolve regional conflict. In some countries with a bicameral legislative system, the upper house is used as a way of reserving representation for certain societal groups and or to replace a further check on the power of the Lower House. The Parliament of UK is a bicameral legislature with the House of Lords (upper house) and the House of Commons (lower house). The House of Lords includes two different types of members- the Lord Spiritual (the senior bishops of the Church of England) and the Lords Temporal (members of the peerage upper ranks of the British nobility) elected by the population at large, but are appointed by the sovereign on the advice of the Prime Minister. The House of Lords also performed a judicial role through the Law Lords prior to the opening of the Supreme Court. In theory, supreme legislative power is vested in the Queen-in-Parliament; in practice real power is vested in the House of Commons, as will be discussed in this article. Therefore how many chamber a parliament should have is a controversial question in constitutional law.


Esther Majambere
Esther Majambere is a Senior Legal Officer at the Uganda Law Reform Commission in Kampala, Uganda.
Practice

Legislatures in Modern States: The Role of Legislature in Ensuring Good Governance Is Inadequate

A Case Study of the United Kingdom and Sierra Leone

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 3-4 2010
Keywords legislature, good governance, comparative analysis
Authors Kadija Kabba
AbstractAuthor's information

    This essay is about examining the role of legislature in ensuring good governance and how adequate or otherwise they are in ensuring good governance. To examine and establish the facts, a comparative analysis is made between the United Kingdom and Sierra Leone Legislatures.This article first and foremost tried to establish that, indeed legislatures all over the world have an important role in ensuring good governance, which is the bed-rock and an essential ingredient in any government intending to thrive in governance, achieve its goals of success and a well-ordered and sustainable society.This piece of work chose transparency and accountability, two vital components that make up the concept of good governance as criteria in making the comparative analysis between two independent countries with legislatures as an arm of the Government.In comparing and analyzing the two jurisdictions, it was further established that there are certain factors that may limit or enhance the achievement of good governance by these legislatures. Nevertheless, the irrefutable fact this article tried to illustrate is that Good Governance needs an effective Parliament.


Kadija Kabba
Kadija Kabba is a Legal Officer and Legislative Drafter at the Central Bank of Sierra Leone. She holds an LL.M from the Universitty of London, A MPhil from the University of Tromsee, Norway, a LL.B and BA Degrees from the University of Sierra Leone. She is also a qualified barrister and Socilitor of the High Court of Sierra Leone.
Article

The ECJ Ruling in Cartesio and Its Consequences on the Right of Establishment and Corporate Mobility in the European Union

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 3-4 2010
Keywords Cartesio, right of establishment, Corporate mobility
Authors Prof. dr.sc. Siniša Petrović and Tomislav Jakšić
AbstractAuthor's information

    Before Cartesio, the case law of the European Court of Justice on freedom of establishment mainly considered company immigration situations, i.e. legal entities moving into another Member State. Cartesio is the first major ruling on company emigration since the 1988 decision in Daily Mail. Consequently, much was expected from Cartesio, notably that it would confirm a company’s right to directly invoke its freedom of establishment in emigration scenarios. However, this was not the case. Although Cartesio introduced some new concepts into the freedom of establishment case law like the concept of company conversion, the freedom of establishment actually took a step backward. This effectively resulted in almost complete disregard of the freedom of establishment in emigration situations - unlike in immigration situations. This partial denial of freedom of establishment, one of the fundamental freedoms of Community law, would seem urge the continuation of work on the new 14th Company Law Directive. In light of the current ECJ case law, only a legislative approach would seem suitable to guarantee non-discrimination in the ongoing regulatory competition between Member States which apply the registered seat theory and those which apply the administrative (real) seat theory.


Prof. dr.sc. Siniša Petrović
Prof. dr. sc. Siniša Petrović is a full professor at the Faculty of Law of the University of Zagreb.

Tomislav Jakšić
Tomislav Jakšić is a Junior Researcher at the Faculty of Law of the University of Zagreb.

Dr. Helen Xanthaki
Article

Act of Parliament: The Role of Parliament in the Legislative Process

A Commonwealth Perspective

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 1-2 2010
Keywords parliament, legislation, pre-legislative scrutiny, supremacy of parliament, delegated legislation, Uganda, legislative process
Authors Denis Kibirige Kawooya
AbstractAuthor's information

    Whereas making law is one of the principal functions of Parliament, Parliament plays a very limited role in the legislative process. In Uganda, like in many commonwealth jurisdictions due to the role the Constitution has given to Parliament, the legislature should take a more active role in the legislative process. The paper examines the legislative authority of Parliament, the concept of Parliamentary supremacy, pre-legislative scrutiny and whether Parliament should be involved in the scrutiny of delegated legislation.


Denis Kibirige Kawooya
Denis Kibirige Kawooya is a Senior State Attorney in the Ministry of Justice and Constitutional Affairs, Uganda, a member of the Commonwealth Association of Legislative Counsel, Uganda Law Society, East African Law Society and an Advocate of the High Court of Uganda.
Article

Legislative Drafting Tools for Stabilization Provisions and Economic Balancing Provisions

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 1-2 2010
Keywords legislative drafting, stabilization, economic balancing provisions
Authors Linnet Mafukidze
AbstractAuthor's information

    The article outlines the problems with stabilization provisions in national oil or gas legislation with regard to the difficulty of governments to implement legislation to develop its economic, social and environmental regimes. It also seeks to provide a potential guideline for legislative drafters in order to address the problems wrought by stabilization provisions, in national oil or gas legislation, through the use of economic balancing provisions. The article further gives tools for legislative drafters to use when drafting economic balancing provisions.


Linnet Mafukidze
Linnet Mafukidze is a Senior State Counsel at the Attorney General’s Chambers, Botswana.
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