Search result: 17 articles

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Year 2015 x

Sumara M. Thompson-King
General Counsel, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

Ágnes Bujdos
PhD candidate at the University of Debrecen Géza Marton Doctoral School of Legal Studies.

Zsófia Eszter Kémeri
PhD student, University of Debrecen, Géza Marton Doctoral School of Legal Studies.

Gábor Kardos
Professor, ELTE Faculty of Law, International Law Department.

Francesco Seatzu
Professor of International and EU Law, University of Cagliari, Italy.

Paolo Vargiu
Lecturer, University of Leicester, United Kingdom.
Article

The Role of Non-Governmental Organizations in Advancing International Criminal Justice

Journal African Journal of International Criminal Justice, Issue 1 2015
Keywords Non-governmental organizations, NGOs and international criminal justice, civil society and human rights, non-state actors in international law
Authors Charles Chernor Jalloh
AbstractAuthor's information

    This article examines the role of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in advancing international criminal justice. I argue that NGOs have had considerable impact by contributing, among other things, to the global struggle against impunity through advocacy for the creation of more robust institutional mechanisms to prosecute those who perpetrate such crimes. This ranges from supporting the processes that led to the creation of several ad hoc international tribunals for Yugoslavia, Rwanda and Sierra Leone, all the way through to their support for the establishment of an independent permanent international penal court based in The Hague. The crux of my claim is that a historically sensitive approach to evaluating the role of NGOs in international governance shows that these entities are not only willing, but also capable of enhancing the protection of human rights and international criminal justice especially but not exclusively in less developed regions of the world.


Charles Chernor Jalloh
Associate Professor, Florida International University, College of Law, Miami, USA. Email: jallohc@gmail.com.
Article

International Code of Conduct for Outer Space Activities

Analysis from an Institutional Perspective

Journal International Institute of Space Law, Issue 7 2015
Authors Anastasia Voronina
Author's information

Anastasia Voronina
University of Nebraska-Lincoln, U.S.A.

Olga S. Stelmakh
Parliament of Ukraine / DRSH Group Int., Ukraine

Maureen Williams
University of Buenos Aires / Conicet, Chair, ILA Space Law Committee

María-del-Carmen Muñoz-Rodríguez
Associate Professor of Public International Law and European Union Law, University of Jaén, Spain

Guoyu Wang
Ph.D. assistant professor, deputy dean of institute of space law of BIT, visiting scholar of National Center for Romote Sensing, Air, and Space Law Mississippi University School of Law (2011-2012), Senior Acadamy Fellow, Chatham House (2014-)

Yangzi Tao
Master in International Law, Beijing Institute of Technology Law School

    Those who talk can be heard. Those who are allowed to talk may be listened to. This study is an attempt to give legal voice to those who cannot talk or are usually not listened to: children. This study is about the attention given to their interests, the best interests of the child. When these interests are immersed in a minority context, children may be overlooked for different reasons, including discriminatory attitudes or prejudice regarding their families. Law and its interpretation must be changed in order to include the difference. This study discusses the best interests of the child principle with special attention to its legal relevance in cases where lesbians, gays, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) are, or want to be, parents. The authoritative source for the interpretation of the principle is the United Nations (UN) Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC). The analysis focuses on the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) and its case law. The study aims to explore the Court’s approach to the best interest of the child and identify whether the principle is being consistently applied in cases involving LGBT families, given the fact that sexual orientation and gender identity are still sensitive issues in Europe. This is done by comparing these cases to cases lodged by applicants who were not identified as an LGBT person. The margin of appreciation doctrine and the lack of European consensus on sexual minorities’ rights are confronted with the urgent paramount consideration that has to be given to children’s best interests. The analysis explores whether there is room for detecting a possible Court’s biased approach towards the concept of the best interests of the child. This study challenges the Court’s decisions in the sense that the focus should not only be at the LGBT parents’ rights to private and family life, but also at the interests of their daughters and sons. This is an attempt to call upon the ECtHR and all states not only to actively fight discrimination against LGBT persons, but, ultimately, to stop interpreting the concept of the best interests of the child in an arguably biased way, and to consider the principle’s legal value in any decision, regardless of their parents’ sexual orientation, gender identity or any other distinction.


Mr. Gabriel Alves de Faria
Gabriel Alves de Faria is a Brazilian lawyer, LGBTI activist and human rights specialist who holds a Law degree from the Federal University of Espirito Santo and a European Master’s Degree in Human Rights and Democratisation (E. MA/EIUC - Utrecht University). Among other legal and social experiences in the human rights field, Gabriel has worked as a researcher in comparative sexual orientation Law at Leiden University and most recently as a Fellow and consultant lawyer at the LGBTI Rapporteurship of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights in Washington, DC. His latest project is a documentary on the situation of LGBTI persons in Southeast Asia.

Nathan A, Johnson
University of Nebraska, College of Law, United States

Steven Freeland
Western Sydney University, Australia

Ram S. Jakhu
Institute of Air and Space Law, McGill University, Canada

Dimitri Linden
University of Leuven, Belgium

Yangzi Tao
Beijing Institute of Technology, China

Guoyu Wang
Beijing Institute of Technology, China

Simona Spassova
Simona Spassova (main author), Faculty of Law, Economics and Finance, University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg

Andreas Loukakis
Andreas Loukakis (coauthor), Faculty of Law, Economics and Finance, University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg
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