Search result: 33 articles

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Year 2011 x
Discussion

Access_open Hybrid Constitutionalism, Fundamental Rights and the State

A Response to Gunther Teubner

Journal Netherlands Journal of Legal Philosophy, Issue 3 2011
Keywords societal constitutionalism, Gunther Teubner, system theory, fundamental rights
Authors Gert Verschraegen
AbstractAuthor's information

    This contribution explores how much state is necessary to make societal constitutionalism work. I first ask why the idea of a global societal constitutionalism ‘beyond the state-and-politics’ might be viewed as a significant and controversial, but nonetheless justified innovation. In the second part I discuss what Teubner calls ‘the inclusionary effects of fundamental rights’. I argue that Teubner underplays the mediating role of the state in guaranteeing inclusion or access, and in a way presupposes well-functioning states in the background. In areas of limited statehood there is a problem of enforcing fundamental rights law. It is an open question whether, and under which conditions, constitutional norms within particular global social spheres can provide enough counter-weight when state constitutional norms are lacking.


Gert Verschraegen
Gert Verschraegen is Assistant Professor of Theoretical Sociology at the University of Antwerp, Belgium.

Diane Howard
McGill University, Montreal

Prof. Irmgard Marboe
University of Vienna

Jonathan F. Galloway
Lake Forest College

Olavo Bittencourt
University of Sao Paulo, Brazil

Dr. Yun Zhao
Faculty of Law, The University of Hong Kong, zhaoy@hku.hk
Article

De verrassend effectieve interne coördinatie van het Belgisch Voorzitterschap van 2010

Algemene analyse en toepassing op de casus Milieubeleid

Journal Res Publica, Issue 3 2011
Keywords Belgium, EU environmental policy, rotating Presidency of the Council, Treaty of Lisbon
Authors Ferdi De Ville, David Criekemans and Tom Delreux
AbstractAuthor's information

    The article analyses the internal coordination between the federal government, the Regions and the Communities in Belgium before and during the 2010 Belgian Presidency of the Council of Ministers. It starts from the observation that the absence of a federal government with full powers, the global financial-economic crisis as well as Belgium’s complex multi-level structure have, counterintuitively, not led to an ineffective internal coordination process. Based on interviews with people who were closely involved in the Belgian Presidency team, the article explains the effectiveness of the internal coordination by arguing that, on the one hand, the detailed and inclusive coordination before the Presidency semester has generated a culture of responsibility and joint ownership among the officials and diplomats and, on the other hand, the Belgian Presidency limited its role to being a facilitator of the European decision-making process in function of the rolling agenda of the Commission and the implementation of the Lisbon Treaty. Empirically illustrating these arguments with insights from the internal coordination in the environmental domain, this article demonstrates that an effective internal coordination, even in a difficult political context, can contribute to a successful Presidency.


Ferdi De Ville
Ferdi De Ville is wetenschappelijk medewerker aan het Steunpunt Buitenlands Beleid en aan het Centrum voor EU-Studies van de Vakgroep Politieke Wetenschappen van de Universiteit Gent. Zijn onderzoek richt zich op Europees Handelsbeleid en de verhouding ervan tot het interne marktbeleid van de EU in het bijzonder.

David Criekemans
David Criekemans is senior onderzoeker Europese en Mondiale Verhoudingen aan het Steunpunt Buitenlands Beleid en gastprofessor Belgisch en Vergelijkend Buitenlands Beleid aan het Departement Politieke Wetenschappen van de Universiteit Antwerpen. Hij doceert tevens aan het International Centre for Geopolitical Studies (ICGS) in Genève (Zwitserland). Zijn onderzoek richt zich op de buitenlandse betrekkingen van regio’s en kleine staten in vergelijkend perspectief, geopolitieke analyse (zowel theoretisch als toegepast) en de geopolitiek van energie (zowel conventioneel als hernieuwbaar). Hij is editor van Regional Sub-State Diplomacy Today (Martinus Nijhoff, 2010).

Tom Delreux
Tom Delreux is docent politieke wetenschappen aan het Institut de sciences politiques Louvain-Europe (ISPOLE) van de Université Catholique de Louvain. Zijn onderzoek richt zich in de eerste plaats op Europees milieubeleid en de EU als internationale actor. Hij is onder andere auteur van het recent verschenen The EU as International Environmental Negotiator (Ashgate, 2011).

Frans G. von der Dunk
University of Nebraska, College of Law, Space and Telecommunications Law Program, Fvonderdunk2@unl.edu

Dr. Ranjana Kaul
Partner, Dua Associates,(Law Offices), New Delhi, India

Nie Jingjing
Civil Aviation University of China, China, jjnie@cauc.edu.cn
Article

Access_open When regulators mean business

Regulation in the shadow of environmental Armageddon

Journal Netherlands Journal of Legal Philosophy, Issue 1 2011
Keywords ecological catastrophe, regulatory legitimacy, regulatory effectiveness, geo-engineering
Authors Han Somsen
AbstractAuthor's information

    This article considers the question how knowledge of an impending ecological catastrophe is likely to impact on regulatory legitimacy and regulatory effectiveness. If the ultimate aim to safeguard meaningful human life on earth is in acute danger, this is likely to translate into zero tolerance towards non-compliance with environmental rules designed to avert catastrophe. This, in turn, will persuade regulators to employ normative technologies that do not engage with the moral reason of regulatees at all, but leave no option but to comply. In addition, regulators may turn to panoptic surveillance techniques that allow no breaches of rules to remain undetected. Finally, it is argued that if and to the extent that impending ecological catastrophe marks the end of maintaining the status quo as a plausible policy goal, regulators will be more sympathetic towards potentially apocalyptic technologies that carry greater promise for future gain than otherwise would be the case.


Han Somsen
Han Somsen is Professor of Regulation & Technology at the Tilburg Institute for Law, Technology and Society, and Dean of Research of Tilburg Law School.

Daniel D. Bradlow
SARCHI Professor of International Development Law and African Economic Relations, University of Pretoria; Professor of Law, American University Washington College of Law; and Chair, Roster of Experts, Independent Review Mechanism, African Development Bank. The views expressed in this article are his personal views, and should not be attributed to any organisation with which he is affiliated.

Megan S. Chapman
Independent Consultant; B.A. University of Chicago; J.D. American University Washington College of Law. The authors wish to thank Anoush Begoyan, Andria Naude Fourie, Werner Kiene, Ellen Hey, David Hunter, Henrik Linders, Per Eldar Sovik, and our anonymous reviewers for comments on various sections and drafts.

Jeroen Temperman
Assistant Professor of Public International Law, Erasmus University Rotterdam; Erasmus Fellow; and Editor-in-Chief of Religion & Human Rights: An International Journal.

Olusoji Nester John
Space Application Laboratory (South-West), National Space Research and Development Agency,Nigeria, Ile-Ife, Nigeria

Eguaroje Ezekierl
Space Application Laboratory (South-West), National Space Research and Development Agency,Nigeria, Ile-Ife, Nigeria

Dr. S.O. Mohammed
National Space Research and Development Agency, Abuja, Nigeria, Garki, Abuja, Nigeria

Ali Akbar Golroo
Aerospace Research Institute, I. R. of IRAN, ali@ari.ac.ir

Professor Mohsen Bahrami
Futures Studies Research Institute, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, Iran

Declan J. O'Donnell Esq., Pres.
United Societies In Space, Inc. & The International Space Development Authority Corporation, isdac.usis@gmail.com, djopc@qwestoffice.net

J.J. Hurtak Ph.D
The Academy For Future Science, jjh@affs.org

Guoyu Wang
Beijing Institute of Technology, School of law, China, kevineskimo@gmail.com. The National Center for Remote sensing Air, and Space Law, University of Mississippi

P.J. Blount
National Center for Remote Sensing, Air, and Space Law, University of Mississippi School of Law, United States, pjblount@olemiss.edu
Article

From Uneasy Compromises to Democratic Partnership

The Prospects of Central European Constitutionalism

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 1 2011
Keywords Central Europe, parliamentarism, freedom of religion, Roma people, discrimination
Authors Gábor Attila Tóth
AbstractAuthor's information

    The Central European constitutional democracies were created by the political and constitutional transition of 1989. However, twenty years later, in the light of antidemocratic, authoritarian and intolerant tendencies, it is far from clear whether the negotiated revolution is a story of success or failure. This paper first outlines the constitutional background of revolutionary transition. It shows that the achieved structures and rules do not prevent political communities from realizing the full promise of democracy. Second, this analysis attempts to explore how the century-old historical circumstances, the social environment, and the commonly failed practice of constitutional institutions interact. This section focuses on the constitutional features of presidential aspirations, the privileges of churches and certain ethnic tensions. Finally, the paper argues that the chances of success of liberal democracies depend significantly on extraconstitutional factors. It seems that Hungary is in a more depressing and dangerous period of its history than for example Poland.


Gábor Attila Tóth
Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Debrecen, former senior adviser, Constitutional Court of Hungary. The author welcomes comments via email: tga818@law.unideb.hu.
Article

Investor Protection v. State Regulatory Discretion

Definitions of Expropriation and Shrinking Regulatory Competence

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 1 2011
Keywords regulatory freeze, expropriation, investor protection, economic governance, environmental protection
Authors Ioannis Glinavos
AbstractAuthor's information

    The purpose of this paper is to offer support to the idea that the contemporary international legal framework offers opportunities to investors to challenge and control government action via what has been described as a ‘regulatory freeze’. This regulatory freeze is the consequence of government reluctance to legislate/regulate in areas where claims of expropriation may be brought. The paper presents evidence from investment-treaty dispute resolution mechanisms, national and supranational judicial processes from both sides of the Atlantic. The paper concludes by suggesting that the potential for expanded definitions of expropriation is having a greater impact than actual case outcomes, as states seek to preempt any adverse developments by shying away from regulations that may provide fertile grounds for challenge. This effect is significant, as it is contrary to expectations of greater state involvement in economic management bred by the financial crisis.


Ioannis Glinavos
Dr. Ioannis Glinavos is Lecturer in Law at the University of Reading, School of Law, i.glinavos@reading.ac.uk.
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