Search result: 158 articles

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Roger Dujardin
Vice Président de l'Union Internationale des Huissiers de Justice et des Officiers Judiciaires (UIHJ) - huissier de justice à Anvers (Belgique).

Catherine Kessedjian
Professeur, Université Panthéon-Assas, Paris II.

Jean-Bernard Auby
Professeur de Droit Public à Sciences Po Paris, Directeur de la Chaire “Mutations de l'Action Publique et du Droit Public.”

Lord Steyn
A Lord of Appeal in Ordinary from 1995 - 2005; now a member of Essex Court Chambers, 24 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2.

John A. E. Vervaele
Professor of economic and financial criminal law, Utrecht Law School and Professor of European criminal law, Europa College Bruges. The basic research for this article was carried out during an Adjunct Professorship at the American Law School of the American University in Washington DC (May-July 2003). The research has been updated up until 1 November 2006. This version is a shortened and updated version of J. A. E. Vervaele, The Anti-Terrorist Legislation in the US: Inter Arma Silent Leges? 13 European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice 201 (2005).

Jan Lokin
Professor of Roman Law, Faculty of Law, University of Groningen.

Guy Canivet
Premier président de la Cour de cassation française.

Esin Örücü
Professorial Research Fellow and Professor Emerita of Comparative Law, University of Glasgow and Professor Emerita of Comparative Law, Erasmus Universiteit, Rotterdam.

Deirdre Curtin
Professor of International and European Governance, University of Utrecht, The Netherlands. This text constitutes a reworked version of a keynote lecture given at the World Congress of Comparative Law in Utrecht on 17 July 2006.
Editorial

Editorial

Journal European Journal of Law Reform, Issue 1 2006
Authors Katharina Boele-Woelki
Author's information

Katharina Boele-Woelki
Professor of Comparative Law, Private International Law and Family Law at the University of Utrecht.

Andrea Schulz
First Secretary at the Permanent Bureau of the Hague Conference on Private International Law. Since the beginning of 2002, the author has been in charge of the negotiations which led to the Convention on Choice of Court Agreements. This article is an updated reprint of an earlier publication by the same author, The Hague Convention of 30 June 2005 on Choice of Court Agreements, VII Yearbook of Private International Law 1 (2005).

Niek Zaman
Professor of Law, University of Utrecht.

Gábor Hamza
Professor of Law at the Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest. This article is based on his inaugural lecture delivered on 6 October 2004 at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

Levent Gonenc
Ankara University, Faculty of Law; leventgonenc@yahoo.com.

Selin Esen
Ankara University, Faculty of Political Sciences; selin.essen@politics.ankara.edu.tr.

Ole Lando
Professor of Law, Copenhagen Business School; Chairman of the Commission on European Contract Law.

Saulė Voluckytė
LL.B., (Concordia International University Estonia), M.A.E.S., (Europa Institut, University of Basel). Formerly Chief Legal Officer, European Law Department under the Government of Lithuania. Lecturer, Mykolas Romeris University, Vilnius. The author would like to thank the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - Juriscope in France and its team - Prof. Jacques David, Dr. Daniela Borcan and Dr. Zhuang Han. This study was undertaken at the request of French Ministry of Justice made through the research centre.

Igor Volner
Legal Counsel, Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics, Oslo, Norway. LL.B. University of Zagreb (Croatia), LL.M. University of Oslo (Norway). This article is based on my LL.M. thesis prepared at the Scandinavian Institute of Maritime Law, Oslo. The author would like to express his gratitude to Prof. Erik Røsæg, University of Oslo, for his guidance and support. Many thanks also to: Prof. Siniša Petrović, Linda Haavik, Karl-Johan Gombrii, Prof. Frank Emmert, Dr. Jasenko Marin, Prof. Vesna Tomljenović and Liv Bente Tiedemann for their helpful comments

Christiana Dr. iur. Fountoulakis
Assistant Professor in Private Law University of Basel

    This article is based on a definition of political and civil servant leadership as a behavioral steering style towards the realization of organizational goals. By means of a grounded theory methodology we get some insights in the characteristics and the interaction between both leadership styles in Flemish cities. This two-faced leadership is depicted by means of a tandem metaphor. First, we identify the relevant dimensions to describe the leadership tandem. It becomes apparent that political leadership styles differ greatly both in time and in scope. Civil servant leadership is generally characterized by a weak but presumably growing impact. This combination results in considerable leadership tensions, which is reinforced by several contingency factors: i.e. the influence of the dominant alderman model, the financial situation, the number of staff, the tendency to professionalize, the dominant political and civil servant culture and the structure of central government (e.g. on a Flemish, Belgian and European level).


Nathalie Vallet
Docent aan het Departement Management van de Universiteit Antwerpen en aan de Master in Publiek Management van de Universiteit Antwerpen Management School (UAMS).

Filip De Rynck
Hoogleraar aan het Departement Handelswetenschappen en Bestuurskunde van de Hogeschool Gent en docent aan de Master in Publiek Management van de Universiteit Antwerpen Management School (UAMS).

    According to our analysis of the campaign expenses declared by the Flemish candidates for the 2003 federal and the 2004 regional elections candidates of the three traditional parties spend, on average, about 70 à 80% of what they are allowed to. The impact of the spending limit is much smaller for the other parties, the candidates of which spend only about 50% of what they are allowed to. Incumbents and candidates who are also mayor in a municipality tend to spend more. The background characteristics of the candidates have almost no effect on the expenditures. There is only a small effect of gender, in the sense that women candidates spend less. On average, one third of the individual campaign expenditures is financed by the individual candidates, and two thirds by the party. However, in the liberal party the contribution of the party is substantially lower (35 à 40% on average), while it is higher (80% on average) in the socialist party as well as for female candidates


Bart Maddens
Hoofddocent aan het Centrum voor Politicologie, K.U.Leuven.

Karolien Weekers
Wetenschappelijk medewerker aan het Centrum voor Politicologie, K.U.Leuven.

Jo Noppe
Doctor in de sociale wetenschappen, K.U.Leuven.
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